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Ducks Unlimited, Inc Introduction In addition to working with the USGS Western Ecological Research Center team led by Joe Fleskes on defining the feasibility and strategies for tracking a variety of key avian habitats in the Central Valley. Ducks Unlimited focused on mapping Central Valley rice habitats that provide large bioenergetic inputs to overwintering waterfowl and shorebirds in the region. The first year of the project characterized rice fields and their winter- flooded state in the Sacramento Valley. This report summarizes our findings and reviews our future plans to quantify foraging habitats in the Central Valley .
The CA LCC and CA Department of Water Resources partnered to host a TEK training for natural resource managers and scientists. The aim was to foster ability to partner with tribes and understand traditional knowledge of the environment.
Distribution (present and historical) maps for all 133 native freshwater fish species in California. Maps include observation made during field surveys by various state and federal agencies. The data are compiled from multiple sources and experts and is stored and exported as rangemaps and summary maps. Sources include databases from CA Fish and Wildlife, NatureServe, CalTrout, and FERC relicensing.The data includes polygons describing these range types:Extant Range - Expert OpinionObservedHistoric Range - Expert OpinionTranslocated - Expert OpinionTranslocated - ObservedData is available as KMZ and SHP formats. To access spatial data for a species, search for it by name, click the “Spatial Data” tab, and then click...
In this CA LCC-funded Climate-Smart Conservation Planning effort, EcoAdapt’s climate adaptation scientists worked with National Forest conservation managers to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop climate-smart adaptation strategies and actions, and generate implementation plans for key habitats of Southern California, with a specific focus on four National Forests (Angeles, San Bernardino, Cleveland, Los Padres). This effort provides information and example case studies for USFS planning and management (e.g., Forest Plan Revisions, Climate Change Performance Scorecard) among other natural resource management and conservation efforts to prepare for climate change impacts in Southern California.
In this CA LCC-funded Climate-Smart Conservation Planning effort, EcoAdapt’s climate adaptation scientists worked with National Forest conservation managers to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop climate-smart adaptation strategies and actions, and generate implementation plans for key habitats of Southern California, with a specific focus on four National Forests (Angeles, San Bernardino, Cleveland, Los Padres). This effort provides information and example case studies for USFS planning and management (e.g., Forest Plan Revisions, Climate Change Performance Scorecard) among other natural resource management and conservation efforts to prepare for climate change impacts in Southern California.
The California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense; hereafter, CTS) is classified as a federally threatened species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2004). Consequently, much research has been done to provide information for its management and conservation. However, previous research has primarily focused on the use of upland, terrestrial environments by CTS (Trenham and Shaffer 2005), the demography of populations (Trenham et al. 2001), and the effects of hybridization between CTS and the introduced, barred tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum mavortium; Johnson et al. 2013). Information on the characteristics of wetlands (e.g., hydrologic regime) that support reproduction and metamorphosis by CTS is limited....
This project integrates fire risk models, species distribution models (SDMs) and population models with scenarios of future climate and land cover to project how the effects of climate-induced changes to species distributions and land use change will impact threatened species in fire-prone ecosystems. This project also identifies and prioritizes potential management responses to climate change (e.g. assisted colonization, fire management, land protection, dispersal corridors). Anticipated products include: 1) maps (digital and hard copy) of habitat suitability under current and future climate change, current and future projected urban growth and combinations of climate change and future projected urban growth, under...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, Academics & scientific researchers, CA, CA-Southern, California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, All tags...
This project used species distribution modeling, population genetics, and geospatial analysis of historical vs. modern vertebrate populations to identify climate change refugia and population connectivity across the Sierra Nevada. It is hypothesized that climate change refugia will increase persistence and stability of populations and, as a result, maintain higher genetic diversity. This work helps managers assess the need to include connectivity and refugia in climate change adaptation strategies. Results help Sierra Nevada land managers allocate limited resources, aid future scenario assessment at landscape scales, and develop a performance measure for assessing resilience.
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2013, CA, California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, Conservation Design, All tags...
The vulnerability of species at risk from climate change is recognized as an important issue in California as well as globally. Assessing vulnerability requires information on the long-term viability of populations and understanding the influences on that viability, due to environmental drivers as well as impacts of management action. We developed population-dynamic models to assess and better understand the long-term population viability of four key, tidal marsh-dependent species, under a variety of environmental conditions, including climate change impacts. In the San Francisco Estuary, each species is represented by one or more subspecies that is entirely or mainly confined to the tidal marsh habitat in the region:...
An online decision support tool for managers, planners, conservation practitioners and scientists.The models generating these maps are the first to take into account the ability of marshes to accrete, or keep up with, rising sea levels, in the San Francisco Bay Estuary.PRBO has generated a series of scenarios to provide a range of projections to address the uncertainty in future rates of sea-level rise and suspended sediment availability.Our maps cover the entire Estuary allowing for analyses at multiple spatial scales.This tool displays maps created at a high spatial resolution using the best available elevation data. The website will be continually updated as new data becomes availableThe tool is the first to...
Each of full climate models (excluding vegetation and elevation variables for which there were no future projections) were subsequently projected onto predicted future climate layers from the IPCC 4th Assessment Report A1B climate change scenario for the decades 2050-2060 and 2080-2090. These predictions represent conservative efforts, however, as the predictions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations may be reached much sooner, as current emissions already exceed the trajectories of the highest scenarios. Thus, projections of genetic variation on the 2080-2090 climate scenarios are likely relevant for purposes of our study. From the predictions of genetic variation under current and future climate, we generated a change...
Distribution maps of ensemble averages and standard deviations for each species modeled future bioclimatic envelope. These maps demonstrate the diversity of projections from the array of modeled studied by the project. Consists of 200 layers: 100 species (50 bird, 50 plant) 2 stats (avg, std) value is 0..1 suitability.
We developed and delivered a training curriculum for two courses in species distribution modelingthat included sample data, multimedia, and module lesson plans. Target audiences will be planners, managers, and technical analysts (GIS Specialists). Final course content and curriculum are availablethrough partner websites and the California Climate Commons.
Sediment and levee data were generated and added to the SLR tool. We decided to measure sediment because there was no viable data. The estimated data used in the tool is the best there is, and there was field data collected to validate it. Available in the Stralberg paper in a table, and zip of shapefiles also attached here.
Coastal areas are high-risk zones subject to the impacts of global climate change, with significant increases in the frequencies of extreme weather and storm events, and sea-level rise forecast by 2100. These physical processes are expected to alter estuaries, resulting in loss of intertidal wetlands and their component wildlife species. In particular, impacts to salt marshes and their wildlife will vary both temporally and spatially and may be irreversible and severe. Synergistic effects caused by combining stressors with anthropogenic land-use patterns could create areas of significant biodiversity loss and extinction, especially in urbanized estuaries that are already heavily degraded. In this paper, we discuss...
An online decision support tool for managers, planners, conservation practitioners and scientists.The models generating these maps are the first to take into account the ability of marshes to accrete, or keep up with, rising sea levels, in the San Francisco Bay Estuary.PRBO has generated a series of scenarios to provide a range of projections to address the uncertainty in future rates of sea-level rise and suspended sediment availability.Our maps cover the entire Estuary allowing for analyses at multiple spatial scales.This tool displays maps created at a high spatial resolution using the best available elevation data. The website will be continually updated as new data becomes availableThe tool is the first to...
This vulnerability assessment is an initial science-based effort to identify how and why focal resources (ecosystems, species populations, and ecosystem services) across the Sierra Nevada region are likely to be affected by future climate conditions. This assessment centers on the Sierra Nevada region of California, from foothills to crests, including ten national forests and two national parks. Twenty‚Äźseven focal resources including eight ecosystems, populations of fifteen species, and four ecosystem services were identified as important by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) as part of their forest plan revision process or by Sierra Nevada stakeholders and are considered in this assessment. Vulnerabilities of these...
This set of elevation models was developed to understand current (2010) conditions of San Francisco salt marshes and for input into sea-level rise prediction models. These elevation models were built by interpolating surveyed elevation points. The elevation surveys were conducted with a Leica RX1230 Real-Time Kinematic GPS which is capable of < 2 cm vertical accuracy.
We conducted detailed resurveys of a montane mammal, Urocitellus beldingi, to examine the effects of climate change on persistence along the trailing edge of its range. Of 74 California sites where U. beldingi were historically recorded (1902–1966), 42 per cent were extirpated, with no evidence for colonization of previously unoccupied sites. Increases in both precipitation and temperature predicted site extirpations, potentially owing to snowcover loss. Surprisingly, human land-use change buffered climate change impacts, leading to increased persistence and abundance. Excluding human-modified sites, U. beldingi has shown an upslope range retraction of 255 m. Generalized additive models of past distribution were...
Change in the percentage of watershed area with critical habitat from 2010 to a future time period These maps display the change in the proportion of watershed area that contains critical habitat from 2010 to a future time period for three IPCC-SRES scenarios – A1B, A2 and B1. Future time periods displayed include 2040, 2070 and 2100. Watershed boundaries are from the 8-digit Watershed Boundary Dataset (http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/huc.html). Critical habitat is defined as critical priority conservation areas mapped in the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s focus area map (http://www.carangeland.org/focusarea.html). Priority conservation areas were defined by The Nature Conservancy as privately-owned rangelands...