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This case study project is on the Upper Pajaro River, which crosses a 9,000-acre natural floodplain in the Central Coast. A portion of the riparian corridor within the floodplain is highly degraded due to intensive agricultural land use that has diminished its wildlife value and severed habitat connectivity. If restored, the corridor would connect 2 million acres of core habitat in adjacent uplands and link exceptionally rich natural communities in three climatically diverse coastal mountain ranges. This project developed a suite of climate-smart restoration practices in the Central Coast Ecoregion and pilot those practices on the Upper Pajaro River as a case study. Project goals are to: 1) Establish native riparian...
Students, teachers, and community members are key to implementing climate-smart restoration. Involving the community, through students, teachers, and families, has been a successful model for the past 15 years of Point Blue’s Students and Teachers Restoring A Watershed Program (STRAW).The following curriculum was designed and implemented with the help of 34 teachers from San Benito, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz counties. The four-lesson program involves three classroom sessions and one restoration day where students are actually doing the professional habitat restoration, working side-by-side with the staff from the STRAW Program.We welcome you to use our curriculum and materials as a model to do climate-smart restoration...
We assessed climate change vulnerability of 156 rare plant species of California. Our work canbe divided into three complementary parts. First (1), we assigned a climate change vulnerability score to each of 156 rare plant species. The vulnerability scores are based on life history attributes and distribution model results, as specified by the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) of NatureServe. The resulting CCVI scores were extremely vulnerable (n = 2), highly vulnerable (n = 40), moderately vulnerable (n = 57), presumed stable (n = 32), increase likely (n = 16), and insuficient evidence (n = 9). The most vulnerable species in our subset were Piperia yadonii, Mimulus purpureus, Calliandra eriophylla, Limosella...
Thanks to the generous support of the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative,Point Blue Conservation Science, The Nature Conservancy, and the Elkhorn Slough CoastalTraining Program were able to develop a suite of climate-smart restoration practices in theCentral Coast Ecoregion, pilot those practices on the Upper Pajaro River, and shareknowledge gained and developed with the local community as well as with the broaderrestoration community in California.This report provides high level results of our work with links to the products developed.
This project designed a monitoring program and protocol to detect the effects of climate change on tidal marsh bird population abundance and distribution. It is a companion to “Tidal Marsh Bird Population and Habitat Assessment for San Francisco Bay under Future Climate Change Conditions” and will build on its products, enabling evaluation of the long-term viability of four tidal-marsh bird species threatened by impacts of climate change: Clapper Rail, Black Rail, Common Yellowthroat, and Song Sparrow (three endemic subspecies: San Pablo, Suisun, and Alameda). Information is available through the California Avian Data Center. See also: http://data.prbo.org/apps/sfbslr/index.php?page=lcc-page
California’s Central Valley supports over 20 endemic, special-status species associated with vernal pools and seasonal wetlands, yet loss of 90% of the original extent of these habitats has resulted in highly-fragmented, remnant pools of varying habitat quality. Managers need science support to inform conservation priorities and possible enhancement of remaining pools, particularly since projected increases in temperature and decreases in precipitation may dry ponds to an extent that reduces or precludes their habitat value. Ongoing changes in climate will, in turn, cause changes in hydrologic regime, with a decreased hydroperiod expected to detrimentally affect reproductive occupancy of special status species such...
Data layers of current and projected suitable habitat for five species: big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), California gnatcatcher, Ceanothus greggii, Ceanothus verrucosus, and Tecate cypress in the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA. Data set includes scenarios with and without projected urban growth over a 50 year period, and with and without projected climate change over a 50 year period. The potential distribution of the big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis) was modeled using a MaxEnt species distribution model using recent and future climate data with presence records from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Species distributions were modeled only for the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA as...
Data layers of current and projected suitable habitat for five species: big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), California gnatcatcher, Ceanothus greggii, Ceanothus verrucosus, and Tecate cypress in the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA. Data set includes scenarios with and without projected urban growth over a 50 year period, and with and without projected climate change over a 50 year period. The potential distribution of Ceanothus greggii was modeled using a MaxEnt species distribution model using recent and future climate data with presence records from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Species distributions were modeled only for the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA as this is where management...
The papers in this special issue feature state-of-the-art approaches to understanding the physical processes related to sediment transport and geomorphology of complex coastal–estuarine systems. Here we focus on the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, extending from the lower San Joaquin–Sacramento Delta, through the Bay, and along the adjacent outer Pacific Coast. San Francisco Bay is an urbanized estuary that is impacted by numerous anthropogenic activities common to many large estuaries, including a mining legacy, channel dredging, aggregate mining, reservoirs, freshwater diversion, watershed modifications, urban run-off, ship traffic, exotic species introductions, land reclamation, and wetland restoration. The...
The Climate Science Alliance - South Coast is a partnership formed to develop and support a network of conservation leaders, scientists, and natural resource managers focused on sharing ecosystem-based resiliency approaches to safeguard our communities and natural resources from climate change risks.In the spirit of collaboration, the California Department of Fish & Wildlife, the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, the San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative, the California Wildlife Foundation, and the Robert and Patricia Switzer Foundation are working together to support the San Diego Climate Science Alliance. The partners are committed to building a foundation for landscape level, long term collaborative...
Data layers of current and projected suitable habitat for five species: big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), California gnatcatcher, Ceanothus greggii, Ceanothus verrucosus, and Tecate cypress in the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA. Data set includes scenarios with and without projected urban growth over a 50 year period, and with and without projected climate change over a 50 year period.
We evaluated the biogeomorphic processes of a large (309 ha) tidal salt marsh and examined factors that influence its ability to keep pace with relative sea-level rise (SLR). Detailed elevation data from 1995 and 2008 were compared with digital elevation models (DEMs) to assess marsh surface elevation change during this time. Overall, 37 % (113 ha) of the marsh increased in elevation at a rate that exceeded SLR, whereas 63 % (196 ha) of the area did not keep pace with SLR. Of the total area, 55 % (169 ha) subsided during the study period, but subsidence varied spatially across the marsh surface. To determine which biogeomorphic and spatial factors contributed to measured elevation change, we collected soil cores...
Understanding factors influencing survival of Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) is essential to species conservation, because drivers of mortality can vary over multiple spatial and temporal scales. Although recent studies have evaluated the effects of climate, habitat quality, or resource management (e.g., hatchery operations) on salmonid recruitment and survival, a failure to look at multiple factors simultaneously leaves open questions about the relative importance of different factors. We analyzed the relationship between ten factors and survival (1980–2007) of four populations of salmonids with distinct life histories from two adjacent watersheds (Salmon and Scott rivers) in the Klamath River basin, California....
Understanding recent biogeographic responses to climate change is fundamental for improving our predictions of likely future responses and guiding conservation planning at both local and global scales. Studies of observed biogeographic responses to 20th century climate change have principally examined effects related to ubiquitous increases in temperature – collectively termed a warming fingerprint. Although the importance of changes in other aspects of climate – particularly precipitation and water availability – is widely acknowledged from a theoretical standpoint and supported by paleontological evidence, we lack a practical understanding of how these changes interact with temperature to drive biogeographic responses....
Environmental Change Network: Current and Future Zonation PrioritizationZonation is a spatial conservation planning software tool that can take into account multiple species to create a hierarchical prioritization of the landscape. This is in contrast to other spatial conservation planning tools which may require predefined conservation targets or areas. Here, we used 199 California landbirds along with Zonation’s “core-area” algorithm to prioritize the California landscape. Species were weighted according to the California Bird Species of Special Concern criteria and probability of occurrence was discounted by distribution model and climate model uncertainty surfaces.The dataset provides priority areas for “current”...
Maps included are the following for the entire Bay Delta and Suisun, North Bay, Central Bay, and South Bay: 2010 elevations from LiDAR 2030: Sed Low/SLR low, Sed Low/SLR high, Sed high/ SLR low, Sed high/ SLR high 2050: Sed Low/SLR low, Sed Low/SLR high, Sed high/ SLR low, Sed high/ SLR high 2110: Sed Low/SLR low, Sed Low/SLR high, Sed high/ SLR low, Sed high/ SLR high Also included are histograms showing area covered by marsh habitat types for the four sea-level rise/sediment scenarios, for the Bay Delta and subregions.
Purpose:The purpose of this Walker Basin Meadows Condition Report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Walker Working Group chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, the working group will use information presented here to plan subsequent restoration efforts once the first group of meadows is restored.Introduction:Meadows of the Walker River basin are an extremely valuable component of the landscape. Meadows provide diverse habitat, including habitat critical to endangered species. They reduce peak flows during storms and soak up spring runoff, recharging groundwater supplies. Meadows filter sediment, provide forage, and are important cultural and recreational...
2 matrices of existing climate change tools, the applicability of relevant tools for use in Southern California coastal wetlands, with information to help understand, choose, and use them, with guidance and sample outputs to help users incorporate them into their work. Will include updated information on the newest models. Two types of models: flood inundation and marsh accretion and habitat response. Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, other resource managers throughout Southern California, CA LCC and Partners.
Vulnerabilities of 27 resources were evaluated during the Vulnerability Assessment Workshop (held March 5-7, 2013); resources included 8 ecosystems (alpine/subalpine, yellow pine/mixed conifer, red fir, wet meadows and fens, oak woodlands, chaparral, sagebrush, and aquatic), 15 species (fisher, marten, bighorn sheep, wood rat, willow flycatcher, mountain quail, sage grouse, Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, mountain yellow-legged frog, red fir, blue oak, black oak, whitebark pine, bristlecone pine, and aspen), and 4 ecosystem services (timber and wood products, carbon, fire, and recreation). The vulnerability assessment results are comprised of evaluations and comments from a participant breakout group during the...
This website offers results from the project “Impacts of climate change on ecology and habitats of waterbirds”, which evaluates projected impacts of climate, urbanization, and water management scenarios on ecology and habitats of waterfowl and other waterbirds in the Central Valley of California.The Central Valley (CVCA) of California contains some of the most important habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds, and other waterbirds in North America. Most waterbird habitats in the CVCA which include wetlands, flooded rice fields, and other agricultural lands, rely on managed surface water supplies stored in reservoirs and delivered via a complex, interconnected system to a wide array of competing water users. Downscaled...