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Crucial stream/river corridors for aquatic species in Wyoming at a scale of 1:100,000. Data is current as of 2007; please check with the Wymoing Game and Fish Department for any potential updates to this dataset: https://wgfd.wyo.gov/Wildlife-in-Wyoming/Geospatial-Data/Habitat-GIS-Information
Flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), and roundtail chub (Gila robusta), hereafter target species, are native to the Colorado River basin and have undergone declines in both abundance and distribution throughout their ranges. Due to these declines, state and federal agencies have entered into a range-wide conservation agreement and strategy to ensure the persistence of these species in their native ranges (Utah Division of Wildlife Resources 2006) Weitzel (2002) reports that these three species were historically abundant in the Green River watershed of southwestern Wyoming. However, populations have declined in Wyoming (Weitzel 2002) and throughout the...
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Habitat Quality Index (HQI) Procedures Manual is a step-by-step guide to the HQI method, which is used to evaluate trout habitat in Rocky Mountain streams. Purpose of the manual is to provide guidance and standards for conducting HQI evaluations. Subjects discussed included preliminary planning, station selection and layout, equipment, data sources, habitat measurements and HQI calculations. The manual promotes familiarity with the HQI by explaining how and what to measure, as well as proper techniuqes and any useful shortcuts. Text instruction are augmented by photos and line drawings. Several examples and case studies illustrate HQI evaluation procedures.
Moose in the Jackson herd make an elevational migration in the southern portion of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This small herd of approximately 500 animals winters primarily in the Buffalo Valley just east of Jackson Lake. During migration, animals travel an average one-way distance of 33 miles, with some animals migrating as far as 67 miles. In the spring, most moose migrate north into the Teton Wilderness or the southern extent of Yellowstone National Park. Summer ranges consist of a mix of conifers and riparian habitats along the upper watersheds that flow into the Snake River. Nearly all moose in this herd are migratory, with the herd sharing a common winter range then branching out in the spring to summer...
Bat conservation is a relatively new phenomenon in Wyoming. Before 1994, bats were not legally protected in the state. In 1994, the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission approved a nongame wildlife regulation protecting several wildlife species, including bats. In 1998, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) joined efforts with other western states to develop the Species Conservation Assessment and Conservation Strategy for the Townsend’s Big-eared Bat (Pierson and others 1999). The resulting document has served as the foundation and the guiding force behind bat conservation efforts in Wyoming. The development of the Western Bat Working Group soon followed this unprecedented proactive conservation initiative....
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The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) first developed a stream classification system in 1961. The inaugural system was intended to identify and rank the most important coldwater recreational fisheries to the State. Over time the system was also used to assess the relative potential impacts of proposed development projects to streams. The system also was adapted as one component in a land use management program to assess the relative value of properties being considered for acquisition by WGFD. The stream ranking protocol was periodically modified over the years. In its present form, streams are ranked using a combination of scores for productivity, accessibility and esthetics. In recent years, fisheries...
The Platte Valley Herd Corridor was designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2018 (fig. 30). The Platte Valley herd contains approximately 11,000 mule deer. The corridor is based on two wintering populations, including a south segment from Saratoga, Wyoming, to the Colorado State line, and a north segment from Saratoga to the Dana Ridge area north of I-80. Winter ranges in the Platte Valley are more dispersed than winter ranges in other parts of the state, so deer migrate in many different directions. Many deer in the southern segment follow the Platte River south to summer ranges in Colorado. Most deer migrations in the north radiate south and east from winter ranges along I-80. The WGFD collared 45...
The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs along the east side of Highway 789. From there, deer migrate north and west to summer ranges on Atlantic Rim, the Sand Hills, and the head of Savery Creek. The southern segment occupies a larger sagebrush winter range on both sides of Highway 789, some of which extends into Colorado. These animals migrate north and west to summer ranges...
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Carney Ranch Company (formerly Carney Land Company and Carney Ranch) have expressed clear interest in protecting their properties and holdings in the Upper Green River Valley from development through the sale of conservation easements on 3,765 acres. An additional 1,200 acres of land owned by Carney Land Company are already under conservation easements held by the Green River Valley Land Trust. The overall, primary objective is to protect and preserve the outstanding wildlife and open space values that currently exist in this portion of the Upper Green River Valley in perpetuity.
These sagebrush treatment protocols are designed to ensure future habitat treatments conform to the provisions of Executive Order 2011-5, to conserve sage-grouse and prevent population declines in core habitat areas.
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Project Synopsis: improved grazing management over the past decade in the lower Coal Creek drainage has resulted in gradual positive trends in riparian habitat conditions. This project will address degraded habitat conditions not directly related to grazing management and build additional trust and cooperation. The Thomas Fork Habitat Management Plan developed cooperatively by WGFD and BLM in 1979 “to preserve, manage, and enhance BCT habitat” identified sediment contribution from the Coal Creek road as an important issue. In 2010, WGFD hired a consultant to develop conceptual plans to address the large amounts of sediment contributed into the stream at eleven (11) key sites along a two (2) mile stretch of Coal...
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Currently, little is known about the native fish assemblages present in the Green River drainage of southwestern Wyoming. Of particular interest are the bluehead sucker (BHS), flannelmouth sucker (FMS), and the roundtail chub (RTC). Bluehead sucker, FMS, and RTC have declined in Wyoming and throughout their native ranges. The Natural Heritage Program assigns BHS the global ranking of G4 suggesting its existence to be abundant and globally secure, although it may be quite rare in parts of its range and is thus the element of long-term concern (Fertig and Beauvais 1999). The Natural Heritage Program assigns FMS the global ranking of G3/G4 suggesting its existence to be uncertain. It is uncommon but seems...
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2002 to 14 April 2003 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in Appendix I or in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department Regional Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was distributed; this Plan...
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Project Synopsis: habitat conditions for both livestock and wildlife are less than desired due, in part, to past management practices on the ranch and inability to better control current cattle grazing location and timing. Plans are to provide water (successful water well drilled in 2011) and fencing for grazing management, habitat improvements on mule deer winter range including invasive plant species (juniper and cheatgrass) control, and riparian improvements in Wood Draw to remove invasive juniper and control noxious weeds including musk thistle and leafy spurge.
Wyoming's State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) From: http://wgfd.wyo.gov/web2011/wildlife-1000407.aspx
Categories: Publication
The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs along the east side of Highway 789. From there, deer migrate north and west to summer ranges on Atlantic Rim, the Sand Hills, and the head of Savery Creek. The southern segment occupies a larger sagebrush winter range on both sides of Highway 789, some of which extends into Colorado. These animals migrate north and west to summer ranges...
Elk within the Jackson herd have been the focus of management for over a century. The herd, which numbers between 9,000 -13,000, winters in Jackson Hole. Most of the herd winters in the sagebrush basins and irrigated fields of the National Elk Refuge, with less than a quarter of the herd wintering in the Gros Ventre drainage to the east. Migrating animals travel an average one-way distance of 39 miles, with some migrating as far as 168 miles. The herd is partially migratory, containing both migrant and residents. In spring, the migrants move north on either side of Jackson Lake, into the eastern foothills of the Teton Range and into the upper drainages of the Snake River and the southern portion of Yellowstone National...
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Scabies, caused by mites of the genus ´╗┐Psoroptes´╗┐, is widespread in free-ranging desert bighorn sheet, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, elk, and white-tailed deer. It has been identified on captive mule deer and may have been present on bison.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2006 to 14 April 2007 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department District Wildlife Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was...
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2004 to 14 April 2005 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department District Wildlife Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was distributed; this Plan was updated...


map background search result map search result map Habitat Quality Index Procedures Manual Modification of The Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s System For Classifying Stream Fisheries Green River Watershed Native Non-Game Fish Species Research: Phase II Carney Ranch Easement Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II Crucial Stream Corridors - 2007 for Wyoming at 1:100,000 Migration Routes of Elk in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Moose in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Platte Valley Herd in Wyoming Carney Ranch Easement Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Moose in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Platte Valley Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II Green River Watershed Native Non-Game Fish Species Research: Phase II Crucial Stream Corridors - 2007 for Wyoming at 1:100,000 Habitat Quality Index Procedures Manual Modification of The Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s System For Classifying Stream Fisheries