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Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers > Northwest CASC > FY 2014 Projects > Changes to Watershed Vulnerability under Future Climates, Fire Regimes, and Population Pressures ( Show direct descendants )

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___Northwest CASC
____FY 2014 Projects
_____Changes to Watershed Vulnerability under Future Climates, Fire Regimes, and Population Pressures
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These data were used to examine how post-fire sedimentation might change in western USA watersheds with future fire from the decade of 2001-10 through 2041-50. The data include previously published projections (Hawbaker and Zhu, 2012a, b) of areas burned by future wildfires for several climate change scenarios and general circulation models (GCMs) that we summarized for 471 watersheds of the western USA. The data also include previously published predictions (Miller et al., 2011) of first year post-fire hillslope soil erosion from GeoWEPP that we summarized for 471 watersheds of the western USA. We synthesized these summarized data in order to project sediment yield from future fires for 471 watersheds through the...
Public Summary: The area burned by wildfires is expected to increase in many watersheds of the world over the next century as a function of climate change. Increased sedimentation due to soil erosion in burned watersheds can negatively impact downstream aquatic ecosystems and the quality and supply of water. At least 65% of the water supply in the western USA originates in watersheds covered by trees, shrubs, and/or grasses that are prone to wildfire16. Understanding how changing fire frequency, extent, and location will affect watersheds, reservoirs, and the ecosystem services they supply to communities is therefore of great societal importance. A primary threat to socio-ecological systems in this region from...
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Increased sedimentation following wildland fire can negatively impact water supply and water quality. Understanding how changing fire frequency, extent, and location will affect watersheds and the ecosystem services they supply to communities is of great societal importance in the western USA and throughout the world. In this work we assess the utility of the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) Sediment Retention Model to accurately characterize erosion and sedimentation of burned watersheds. InVEST was developed by the Natural Capital Project at Stanford University (Tallis et al., 2014) and is a suite of GIS-based implementations of common process models, engineered for high-end computing...
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The area burned annually by wildfires is expected to increase worldwide due to climate change. Burned areas increase soil erosion rates within watersheds, which can increase sedimentation in downstream rivers and reservoirs. However, which watersheds will be impacted by future wildfires is largely unknown. Using an ensemble of climate, fire, and erosion models, we show that post-fire sedimentation is projected to increase for nearly nine-tenths of watersheds by > 10% and for more than one-third of watersheds by > 100% by the 2041 to 2050 decade in the western USA. The projected increases are statistically significant for more than eight-tenths of the watersheds. In the western USA, many human communities rely on...


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