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Project Synopsis: the Ferris Mountain project area consists of mainly timbered slopes, interspersed with upland areas dominated by sagebrush, grass, and mountain shrub communities. Timber stands within the project unit consist of Douglas fir, subalpine fir, spruce, lodgepole pine, limber pine, and aspen, in addition to scattered locations of Rocky Mountain juniper. Long-term suppression of wildfires has promoted the encroachment of conifers into shrublands, aspen stands, and drainages supporting aspen, waterbirch and willows, to the point where many of these communities are non-functional. Decadence and disease is commonly observed in terms of mistletoe, blister rust, and bleeding rust, and pine beetles have...
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Project Synopsis: BLM Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) proposes to construct riparian exclosures within the “Sage” sage-grouse core area as designated by the Wyoming Governor’s Executive Order (EO 2011-5). During late summer, fall and early winter of 2011 the BLM mapped and inventoried approximately 190 reservoirs and 50 springs/seeps in the Ruby Priority Project area. After compiling 2011 data, the BLM identified several springs/seeps as priorities for protection/enhancement. The springs/seeps are repeatedly grazed to the extent that hummocks are forming or have already formed. Once hummocks form or start to form, the immediate threat is a high soil compaction which could result in a lower water table, the spring/seep...
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Project Synopsis: the goal of this study is to define the potential accumulation of hydrocarbons in surface waters and aquatic habitats of the New Fork River and to establish a baseline of potential toxicological effects on aquatic life.
In this newsletter the topics covered are the Science Workshop, Expansion of WLCI Boundries, 2009 Budget, LPDTs at Work, Term Easements/Leases, and Catching up to Wind Development.
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI Newsletter
This zip file is a folder that contains the shapefiles for all habitat projects funded by the WLCI Coordination Team from 2007 - 2011. The folder contains over 300 files and several folders comprising multiple shapefiles.
In this newsletter, the topics covered included Sommers-Grindstone Project, Executive Committee Meeting, the Conservation Action Plan, Spreading the WLCI Message, and Stimulus Funds at Work.
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI Newsletter
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Project Synopsis: improved grazing management over the past decade in the lower Coal Creek drainage has resulted in gradual positive trends in riparian habitat conditions. This project will address degraded habitat conditions not directly related to grazing management and build additional trust and cooperation. The Thomas Fork Habitat Management Plan developed cooperatively by WGFD and BLM in 1979 “to preserve, manage, and enhance BCT habitat” identified sediment contribution from the Coal Creek road as an important issue. In 2010, WGFD hired a consultant to develop conceptual plans to address the large amounts of sediment contributed into the stream at eleven (11) key sites along a two (2) mile stretch of Coal...
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This is a multi-year project to repair a diversion structure which is preventing a head-cut from continuing upstream. Objectives: 1) Reduce or halt erosion occurring at the headcut. 2) Halt the headcut progression which may infringe on and destabilize upstream railroad, highway, interstate, and mine PMT. 3) Halt the headcut progression into the upstream channel morphology and riparian regime. Strategies: • Detailed runoff and flow analysis to the headcut location for the associated 830 square mile drainage area. • Selection of the acceptable design event/peak design flow for the structure. • Determination of all permitting requirements, timeframes, and responsibilities. • Evaluation of the native material stability...
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The fence, an east to west boundary animals must attempt to fight their way through this non-wildlife friendly fence, increasing their opportunity to become entangled in the fence. With the conversion of this 3 miles of sheep and barbed wire to wildlife friendly fencing, animal migration will be improved so death and injuries associated with the existing fence will be reduced.
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Project Synopsis: habitat conditions for both livestock and wildlife are less than desired due, in part, to past management practices on the ranch and inability to better control current cattle grazing location and timing. Plans are to provide water (successful water well drilled in 2011) and fencing for grazing management, habitat improvements on mule deer winter range including invasive plant species (juniper and cheatgrass) control, and riparian improvements in Wood Draw to remove invasive juniper and control noxious weeds including musk thistle and leafy spurge.
The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is creating Local Project Development Teams to use expertise at the local level that will help in the development and prioritization of projects. The teams will provide local input to cooperatively identify resource needs and develop strategies to address issues within the WLCI area.
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI Newsletter
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Strategies: a three-pronged approach will continue to be taken during the next three years, with WLCI funds primarily going toward the first "prong" (much of this in the Greys River drainage), and some funds going toward the second "prong": 1. Prevent the successful establishment of noxious weed species not yet established on National Forest System lands in the Greys River Ranger District. 2. Prevent the successful establishment of new infestations of spotted knapweed, leafy spurge, yellow toadflax, and Dyer’s woad beyond existing perimeters along roads, trails, and adjoining lands, and either eliminate existing patches or reduce the density of noxious weed densities to a point in which a native plant diversity...
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Project Synopsis: the strategy for restoring the habitat on Currant Creek is to permanently exclude unauthorized livestock from the stream and adjacent meadows unless livestock are authorized in the special use pasture. Livestock are only to be permitted to graze every 3rd year for 3 weeks or as approved by authorized officer. (It's been about ten years since grazing has been authorized in the area due to resource concerns.) The most imminent threat to the currant creek habitat is continual cattle drift into the drainage. This results in the unauthorized grazing of riparian vegetation and BLM projects such as willow, aspen, and other woody species plantings. The area is important habitat (ACEC area) for Colorado...


map background search result map search result map Fish Creek Wildlife Friendly Fencing Project Irrigated Lands Protected Properties and Easements Sage-grouse Stipulations Resource Index - Terrestrial - Agriculture Important Agricultural Lands BLM Wilderness Study Areas Federal Protected Lands Lands (NPS Units, FWS Refuges, USFS Wilderness) BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction Grey's River Ranger District Noxious Weed Control RSFO-Currant Creek Habitat Restoration Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II Bitter Creek Restoration 2013 New Fork River Infiltration of Trace Organics Sage-grouse Core Area Riparian Exclosure Project Fish Creek Wildlife Friendly Fencing Project Sage-grouse Core Area Riparian Exclosure Project Grey's River Ranger District Noxious Weed Control New Fork River Infiltration of Trace Organics Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II RSFO-Currant Creek Habitat Restoration Bitter Creek Restoration 2013 BLM Wilderness Study Areas Federal Protected Lands Lands (NPS Units, FWS Refuges, USFS Wilderness) Protected Properties and Easements Sage-grouse Stipulations Resource Index - Terrestrial - Agriculture Irrigated Lands Important Agricultural Lands