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Filters: partyWithName: U.S. Geological Survey (X) > partyWithName: Aaron T. Pearse (X)

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The central Platte River Valley represents a key mid-latitude stopover This dataset supports a contemporary analysis of nocturnal roost selection for sandhill cranes staging along the Platte River during 2003-2007. We explored variation in selection for previously established characteristics of roost sites, including river channel width, vegetation height along the river bank, and distance to nearest disturbance feature. This analysis also included novel environmental factors (yearly estimates of corn near roost sites, nightly temperature, wind speed, and river discharge) and how they may interact with the more established characteristics.
Whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate twice each year through the Great Plains in North America. Recovery activities for this endangered species include providing adequate places to stop and rest during migration, which are generally referred to as stopover sites. To assist in recovery efforts, initial estimates of stopover site use intensity are presented, which provide opportunity to identify areas across the migration range used more intensively by whooping cranes. We used location data acquired from 58 unique individuals fitted with platform transmitting terminals that collected global position system locations. Radio-tagged birds provided 2,158 stopover sites over 10...
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A whooping crane energetic model was developed as a component of a larger effort to ascertain potential take, as defined by the Endangered Species Act, of whooping cranes from proposed development of wind-energy infrastructure in the Great Plains of North America. The primary objectives of this energetic model were to (1) predict extra flight energy that whooping cranes may require to find suitable migration stopover sites if they are unable to use a primary site; and (2) express energy expended as additional time required to replenish lipid reserves used to fuel flight. The energetic model is based on three elements related to energy: expenditure of energy, intake of energy, and constraints to energy intake. The...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate through the Great Plains twice each year. Although there is much interest in conservation and management for this species, information regarding characteristics of nocturnal roost sites used during migration has been limited and based largely on incidental observations. Using high-quality location data collected concurrently, we directed a companion field study designed to characterize sites used as roost or day-use sites to augment knowledge and assist the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program in identifying migration habitat for restoration, conservation, and management actions along the Platte River in central Nebraska....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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The whooping crane (Grus americana) is a listed endangered species in North America, protected under federal legislation in the United States and Canada. The only self-sustaining and wild population of Whooping Cranes nests at and near Wood Buffalo National Park near the provincial border of Northwest Territories and Alberta, Canada. Birds from this population migrate through the Great Plains of North America and winter along the Gulf Coast of Texas at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge and surrounding lands. These data represent migration corridors and precision estimates for this population that can be used for conservation planning activities, including targeting conservation, mitigation, and recovery actions and...
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Numerous wind energy projects have been constructed in the central and southern Great Plains, USA, the main wintering area for midcontinent Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis). We assessed exposure of wintering Sandhill Cranes to the current distribution of wind towers in the central and southern Great Plains by estimating overlap using location data from platform transmitting terminals (PTT) collected during winters 1998–2004. Because 90% of wind towers in the region were installed 2004–2013, comparing an established distribution of wind towers (as of January 2014) with pre-construction crane (1998-2004) distribution provides an initial assessment of the midcontinent population’s exposure. Distributions of cranes...
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Whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate twice each year through the Great Plains in North America. Recovery activities for this endangered species include providing adequate places to stop and rest during migration, which are generally referred to as stopover sites. To assist in recovery efforts, initial estimates of stopover site use intensity are presented, which provide opportunity to identify areas across the migration range used more intensively by whooping cranes. We used location data acquired from 58 unique individuals fitted with platform transmitting terminals that collected global position system locations. Radio-tagged birds provided 2,158 stopover sites over 10...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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These data were developed to support an effort to characterize migration strategies in the U.S. Great Plains and Canadian Prairies and to explore sources of heterogeneity in their migration strategy, including space use, timing, and performance. Data come from locations and other information related to 58 marked Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) from 2010–2016. These data represent basic information about space use during migrations of marked whooping cranes, including intensity of use and fidelity.
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Sandhill cranes are a long-lived bird species found in wetland-rich landscapes across North America. This dataset includes locations of 5 cranes during a single autumn migration from their breeding areas in northeastern Asia and south through Alaska, central Canada, and the Great Plains. The migration ends in northern Texas and northern Mexico. These data were used as a case study to highlight the utility of a continuous-time movement model to characterize animal migration and networks.
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These data were developed to support an effort to characterize migration strategies in the U.S. Great Plains and Canadian Prairies and to explore sources of heterogeneity in their migration strategy, including space use, timing, and performance. Data come from locations and other information related to 58 marked Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) from 2010–2016. These data represent basic information about migrations of marked whooping cranes, including dates of initiation and termination of migration, time in migration, distance of migration, number of stopover sites used, and other metrics. Also included are data related to individual sites used by whooping cranes during migration.


    map background search result map search result map Wintering sandhill crane exposure to wind energy development in the central and southern Great Plains, USA datasets Sandhill crane roosts use, channel characteristics, and environmental variables along the Platte River, Nebraska, 2003-2007 Sandhill crane locations, autumn 2013 migration Map of whooping crane migration corridor Characterization of whooping crane migrations and stopover sites used in the Central Flyway, 2010-2016 Characterization of whooping crane migration space use in the Central Flyway, 2010-2016, spatial data Wintering sandhill crane exposure to wind energy development in the central and southern Great Plains, USA datasets Map of whooping crane migration corridor Characterization of whooping crane migrations and stopover sites used in the Central Flyway, 2010-2016 Characterization of whooping crane migration space use in the Central Flyway, 2010-2016, spatial data Sandhill crane locations, autumn 2013 migration