Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: partyWithName: Lisa Landenburger (X) > Types: Citation (X)

18 results (38ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The Randomized Shortest Path (RSP) raster delineates potential dispersal paths for male-mediated gene flow between grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE). A RSP algorithm was used to estimate the average number of net passages for all grid cells at a spatial resolution of 300 m in the study region which spans parts of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. RSP rasters identify potential movement paths for 3 levels of random deviation determined by the parameter Θ (i.e., Θ = 0.01, 0.001, and 0.0001) for bears moving from an origin to a destination node. Lower values of Θ result in greater exploration and more random deviation around...
thumbnail
The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1980-1989. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1980 to1989.
thumbnail
The Conservation Strategy Management Area (CSMA) is an area within which a delisted Yellowstone grizzly bear population was managed with the objective to maintain a stable to increasing population. The CSMA was formalized in the 2007 Federal Rule (72 FR 14866) which removed the Yellowstone distinct population segment from Federal protection as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The CSMA was delineated as the area from within which the Yellowstone grizzly bear population size was estimated and sustainable mortality thresholds and demographic criteria were applied. The decision to replace the CSMA boundary with the Demographic Monitoring Area was first approved by the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee...
thumbnail
The Yellowstone grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) was listed as a threatened species in 1975 (Federal Register 40 FR:31734-31736). Since listing, recovery efforts have focused on increasing population size, improving habitat security, managing bear mortalities, and reducing bear-human conflicts. The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC; partnership of federal and state agencies responsible for grizzly bear recovery in the lower 48 states) and its Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommitte (YES; federal, state, county, and tribal partners charged with recovery of grizzly bears in the Greater Yelowston Ecosystem [GYE]) tasked the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team to provide information and further research relevant to three...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
thumbnail
The Suitable Habitat boundary identifies areas inside the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem where habitat is deemed suitable for supporting a viable and self-sustaining Yellowstone grizzly bear population into the foreseeable future. The boundary was established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and formalized in the 2007 Final Rule to remove the Yellowstone grizzly bear from federal protection as a Threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (72 FR 14866 – currently vacated).
thumbnail
Flight Observation Units, also referred to as Bear Observation Areas (BOAs), were delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) to facilitate systematic aerial monitoring of the grizzly bear population within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Flight units were last updated in 2014 to depict 54 distinct observation areas spanning the spatial extent of the Demographic Monitoring Area established for the Yellowstone grizzly bear population.
thumbnail
The Distinct Population Segment (DPS) boundary is an area formalized in the 2007 Final Delisting Rule (72 FR 14866) which designates the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) population of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) as a single and distinct population from the remaining populations in the lower 48 States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service applied the DPS policy based on the discreteness and significance of the Yellowstone population segment in relation to the remainder of the taxon in the conterminous 48 States.
thumbnail
The 2016 Food Storage Order (FSO) boundary layer depicts those areas on Federal lands within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) where legal requirements pertaining to safe storage, possession, and handling of food and other grizzly bear attractants are implemented. FSOs give Forest Supervisors and National Park Superintendents the authority to close or restrict the use of designated areas under their jurisdiction in order to minimize human/grizzly bear conflicts. As of 2016, FSOs are prescribed on 98% of all Forest and Park Service lands inside the grizzly bear demographic monitoring area of the GYE. FSOs help facilitate connectivity between the Yellowstone grizzly bear and adjacent populations by minimizing...
thumbnail
Bear Management Units (BMUs) are management areas within the Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone (GBRZ) that were delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) to assist in managing habitat and monitoring population trends of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population. BMU areas approximate the size of the lifetime range of an average adult female and reflect areas of biological relevance to grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). The GBRZ was divided into 18 distinct BMUs to facilitate monitoring and ensure that adequate habitat and numbers of grizzly bears are well distributed throughout the GYE recovery zone.
thumbnail
For several decades, grizzly bear populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) have increased in numbers and range extent. The GYE population remains isolated and although effective population size has increased since the early 1980s, genetic connectivity between these populations remains a long-term management goal. With only ~110 km distance separating current estimates of occupied range for these populations, the potential for gene flow is likely greater now than it has been for many decades. We sought to delineate potential paths that would provide the opportunity for male-mediated gene flow between the two populations. We first developed step-selection...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecosphere
thumbnail
The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 2000-2014. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 2000 to 2014.
thumbnail
Increasing winter use of steep, high-elevation terrain by backcountry recreationists has elevated concern about disturbance of denning grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). To help identify areas where such conflicts might occur, we developed a spatially explicit model to predict potential denning areas in the GYE. Using a scan area of 630 m around each location, we assigned site attributes to 344 den locations of radio-trackedg rizzly bears from 1975-99. Attributesi dentified as predictorsf or the analysis included elevation, slope, an index of solar radiation, and forest cover. We used the Mahalanobis distance statistic to model the similarity between sites used by denning bears...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ursus
thumbnail
The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1990-2000. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1990 to 2000.
thumbnail
The Demographic Monitoring Area (DMA) is the boundary within which all demographic criteria for the Yellowstone grizzly bear population are currently monitored and evaluated. The DMA replaces the Conservation Strategy Management Area (CSMA) as the area within which total grizzly bear population size is estimated and biologically sustainable mortality thresholds are established. All grizzly bear observations and mortalities inside the DMA are counted toward population estimates and mortality thresholds; however, observations outside the monitoring area are also recorded and reported by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team.
thumbnail
The grizzly bear distribution boundary delineates the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 2000-2014. The distribution boundary was generated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 2000 to 2014.
thumbnail
Exurban development is consuming wildlife habitat within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem with potential consequences to the long-term conservation of grizzly bears Ursus arctos. We assessed the impacts of alternative future land-use scenarios by linking an existing regression-based simulation model predicting rural development with a spatially explicit model that predicted bear survival. Using demographic criteria that predict population trajectory, we portioned habitats into either source or sink, and projected the loss of source habitat associated with four different build out (new home construction) scenarios through 2020. Under boom growth, we predicted that 12 km2 of source habitat were converted to sink...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Wildlife Biology
thumbnail
Bear management subunits are subdivisions of larger bear management units (BMUs) that make up the Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone (GBRZ) located at the core of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Subunits were delineated to assist in the management and monitoring of grizzly bear habitat and population trends. The 18 BMUs comprising the Yellowstone GBRZ were subdivided into a total of 40 subunits to provide greater landscape resolution and to account for seasonal heterogeneity of grizzly bear use patterns within a BMU. Subunits were typically delineated at the scale of the average annual home range of an adult female grizzly bear in the GYE and typically consist of a major drainage enclosed by segments of intervening...
thumbnail
The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1973-1979. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1973 to1979.


    map background search result map search result map Impacts of rural development on Yellowstone wildlife: linking grizzly bear Ursus arctos demographics with projected residential growth Bear Management Subunits for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Bear Management Units for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy Management Area for the Yellowstone Ecosystem Demographic Monitoring Area for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Distinct Population Segment Boundary of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1973-1979) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1980-1989) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1990-2000) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Food Storage Order in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem 2016 Suitable Grizzly Bear Habitat in the Yellowstone Ecosystem Randomized shortest paths for Grizzly Bear dispersal between the GYE and NCDE Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Flight Observation Units for Monitoring the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population Impacts of rural development on Yellowstone wildlife: linking grizzly bear Ursus arctos demographics with projected residential growth Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1973-1979) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1980-1989) Bear Management Units for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Bear Management Subunits for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1990-2000) Demographic Monitoring Area for the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Flight Observation Units for Monitoring the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population Suitable Grizzly Bear Habitat in the Yellowstone Ecosystem Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Conservation Strategy Management Area for the Yellowstone Ecosystem Food Storage Order in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem 2016 Distinct Population Segment Boundary of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Randomized shortest paths for Grizzly Bear dispersal between the GYE and NCDE