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The Randomized Shortest Path (RSP) raster delineates potential dispersal paths for male-mediated gene flow between grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE). A RSP algorithm was used to estimate the average number of net passages for all grid cells at a spatial resolution of 300 m in the study region which spans parts of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. RSP rasters identify potential movement paths for 3 levels of random deviation determined by the parameter Θ (i.e., Θ = 0.01, 0.001, and 0.0001) for bears moving from an origin to a destination node. Lower values of Θ result in greater exploration and more random deviation around...
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The Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone (GBRZ) for the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) delineates the area inside the GYE where demographic and habitat criteria were applied, monitored, and evaluated to achieve recovered status of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population. The GBRZ was established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1993 as part of the Recovery Plan for grizzly bears in the lower 48 conterminous United States. The recovery zone boundary identifies the known distribution of bears at that time and encompasses seasonal habitats needed to support a recovered population. The GYE recovery zone spans portions of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming and includes parts of 5 National Forests (Beaverhead-Deerlodge,...
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1980-1989. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1980 to1989.
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 2004-2018. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem during 2004 to 2018.
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For several decades, grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) have increased in numbers and range extent. Whereas the NCDE population is contiguous with grizzly bear populations in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, genetic evidence suggests the GYE population remains isolated. Recent analyses indicate the effective population size of GYE grizzly bears has increased and is approaching levels needed for long-term viability. With only ~110 km distance separating current estimates of occupied range for these populations, the potential for immigration into the GYE from an NCDE migrant, or vice versa, is likely greater now than...
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Flight Observation Units, also referred to as Bear Observation Areas (BOAs), were delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) to facilitate systematic aerial monitoring of the grizzly bear population within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Flight units were last updated in 2014 to depict 54 distinct observation areas spanning the spatial extent of the Demographic Monitoring Area established for the Yellowstone grizzly bear population.
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Grizzly bear recovery zones were established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1993 to delineate regions in the lower 48 states that have sufficient habitat to target recovery for five, and possibly six remnant grizzly bear populations. Recovery zones represent the five known populations in the lower 48 United States including the Northern Continental Divide, Greater Yellowstone, Cabinet-Yaak, Selkirk, and North Cascade populations. The bitterroot ecosystem in Idaho represents the possible sixth population. The grizzly bear once ranged across a large portion of western North America from northern Mexico to Alaska and across much of Canada. Current distribution in the lower 48 United States is reduced to less...
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This dataset provides numbers of documented mortalities for independent aged ( ≥ 2-years-old) grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) from human and undetermined causes that occurred during 1998–2017 within 49-km2 (7- x 7-km) grid cells from the Greater Yellowstone (GYE) and Northern Continental Divide (NCDE) ecosystems of the western United States.
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 2000-2014. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 2000 to 2014.
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This dataset consists of point features identifying indices for potential passage rate at intersections with major transportation corridors for grizzly bear movements between the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) in the northwestern United States. Points are spaced at 300-meter intervals along major road corridors (interstates and U.S. highways) and are populated with values from Randomized Shortest Path (RSP) predictive raster models of potential male grizzly bear movement between the two ecosystems as described in Peck et al. 2016 (Potential paths for male-mediated gene flow to and from an isolated grizzly bear population, Ecosphere 8(10):e01969). RSP scores extracted...
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1990-2000. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1990 to 2000.
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary delineates the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 2000-2014. The distribution boundary was generated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 2000 to 2014.
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The grizzly bear distribution boundary represents the estimated geographic extent of occupied range of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population for the period 1973-1979. The distribution boundary was delineated to provide reliable estimations of grizzly bear occupancy throughout time and for use as a monitoring tool in grizzly bear management and conservation. The boundary was delineated by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) using an interpolation method based on grizzly bear telemetry and GPS locations as well as verified observations and signs of grizzly bears inside the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem during 1973 to1979.


    map background search result map search result map Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1973-1979) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1980-1989) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1990-2000) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Potential movement paths for male grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) dispersal between the Northern Continental Divide and Greater Yellowstone Ecosystems, 2000-2015 Randomized shortest paths for Grizzly Bear dispersal between the GYE and NCDE Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Flight Observation Units for Monitoring the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone for the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Grizzly Bear Recovery Zones in the Lower 48 United States Grizzly bear mortalities in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Continental Divide Ecosystems, 1998-2017 Potential grizzly bear passage along major road corridors in northwest Montana Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2004 - 2018) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1973-1979) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1980-1989) Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone for the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (1990-2000) Flight Observation Units for Monitoring the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Population Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2000-2014) Distribution of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear (2004 - 2018) Potential grizzly bear passage along major road corridors in northwest Montana Potential movement paths for male grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) dispersal between the Northern Continental Divide and Greater Yellowstone Ecosystems, 2000-2015 Randomized shortest paths for Grizzly Bear dispersal between the GYE and NCDE Grizzly Bear Recovery Zones in the Lower 48 United States Grizzly bear mortalities in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Continental Divide Ecosystems, 1998-2017