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Isaak, D., S. Wenger, E. Peterson, J. Ver Hoef, C. Luce, S. Hostetler, J. Dunham, J. Kershner, B. Roper, D. Nagel, D. Horan, G. Chandler, S. Parkes, S. Wollrab. 2015. Development and application of NorWeST stream temperature climate scenarios for the Pacific Northwest. North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative webinar, January 27.
We will translate existing modeled hydroclimatic data into metrics used for water crossing design and replacement. WDFW permits (Hydraulic Code Rules, Chapter 220-110 WAC) and provides technical guidance for construction of hundreds of fish passable culverts, a number which is expected to rise dramatically in response to a 2013 federal court injunction directing the state to repair thousands of culverts that inhibit salmon migration. Current WDFW design guidance does not account for changes in hydrology resulting from climate change. This project will support the development of designs that maintain desired performance (e.g. connectivity benefits to aquatic organisms) throughout water crossings expected life.This...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, Academics & scientific researchers, Anadromous fish, Applications and Tools, Climate Change, All tags...
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Streams across the world are highly fragmented due to the presence of in-stream barriers (e.g., dams and stream-road crossings), many of which restrict or block fish passage. Retrofitting or replacing these structures is a high priority for restoring habitat connectivity for native fishes and other aquatic organisms in the Pacific Northwest. The task of restoring habitat connectivity for problematic stream-road crossings is daunting given the many thousands of barriers that are present and the massive financial investments required. Further, the potential risks to road infrastructure from flooding, debris flows, and climate change will need to be addressed to ensure the best allocation of resources. In this study,...
FY2017Removal of livestock grazing is a common prescription to promote ecosystem recovery after wildfire (and subsequent emergency site rehabilitation efforts). Ecosystem recovery is typically considered from a terrestrial perspective, but wildfire and grazing can strongly influence aquatic ecosystems as well, especially smaller and fragmented stream networks, which are prevalent in the Great Basin (Minshall et al. 1989[1]; Dunham et al. 2003[2]; Luce et al. 2012[3]). Understanding these influences is essential for managing fire and grazing. Examples include identifying timeframes for resuming livestock grazing following wildfire, and the interactions between livestock grazing, fuels, and recovery of stream-side...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Data Acquisition and Development, Federal resource managers, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, All tags...
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NorWeST summer stream temperature scenarios were developed for all rivers and streams in the western U.S. from the > 20,000 stream sites in the NorWeST database where mean August stream temperatures were recorded. The scenarios include: 1) Adobe PDF format maps depicting historical and future modeled mean August stream temperatures, 2) graphs (JPG format) demonstrating the accuracy of the temperature model, and 3) GIS shapefiles (SHP format) representing the spatially modeled stream temperatures. The GIS shapefiles include stream lines and associated mid-points representing 1 kilometer intervals along the stream network. Stream lines were derived from the 1:100,000 scale NHDPlus dataset (USEPA and USGS 2010; McKay...
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This project builds upon existing data and collaborations to incorporate climate change and economic considerations into a decision support framework for prioritizing restoration of passage. Planned outcomes will help guide on-the-ground decisions in terms of adapting to anticipated climate effects, allocating limited resources for restoration, and providing tools that can be adapted across the NPLCC and beyond.
This project builds upon existing data and collaborations to incorporate climate change and economic considerations into a decision support framework for prioritizing restoration of passage. Planned outcomes will help guide on-the-ground decisions in terms of adapting to anticipated climate effects, allocating limited resources for restoration, and providing tools that can be adapted across the NPLCC and beyond.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, Applications and Tools, Applications and Tools, Climate Change, Conservation Planning, All tags...
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Streams are classified as perennial (flowing uninterrupted, year-round) or intermittent (flowing part of the year) or ephemeral (flowing only during rainfall events). The classifications of “streamflow permanence” were primarily established in the middle 20th century and are often outdated and inaccurate today if they were not adjusted for changes in land use, wildfires, or climate.Understanding where streams are perennial is important for a variety of reasons. For example, perennial streams receive special regulatory protections under a variety of statutes, and provide important habitat for fish, wildlife, and other species. To predict the likelihood that streams are perennial, we compiled nearly 25,000 observations...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2016, CASC, Completed, Completed, Completed, All tags...
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Water in the western United States is disappearing, and several states are facing severe water shortages as drought conditions worsen. Many streams are drying up, and there is growing concern that this trend will only continue as climate change produces warmer and drier conditions. The loss of stream ecosystems has far reaching ecological, social, and economic implications. Species that depend on these ecosystems for habitat will be at greater risk of extinction and humans will lose vital sources of water relied upon for agriculture, drinking water, and recreation. This project aimed to identify how water availability is changing in the West, focusing specifically on when and where streams go dry. Researchers...
Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, AK-1, AK-1, AK-1, AK-1, All tags...
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The bull trout, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, is well adapted to the cold waters of the Northwest. Recent changes in climate have caused winter flooding and warmer summer water temperatures in the region, reducing the cold-water habitats that bull trout depend on. The southernmost bull trout populations, found in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Nevada, are currently restricted to small reserves where the coldest waters still exist. These shrinking habitats have created a severed environment being further split by dams, poor water quality, and invasive species. The goal of this project was to determine how these factors threaten the species regionally by using predictions of stream...
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Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.
FY2011Thousands of data points have been collected by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Nevada Division of Wildlife from the 1950s to the present describing the distribution of declining native redband and endangered Lahontan cutthroat trout, and the invasive, nonnative brown and brook trout. USGS analyzed this data to understand the climate-related changes to species distributions and model extinction risk. The results, submittedfor publication, will be used by the State of Oregon as it drafts conservation plans for redband trout and by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection in drafting water quality criteria to protect and monitor the states coldwater fisheries.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, California, California, California, California, All tags...
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Salmonids (a family of fish that includes salmon, trout, and char) are a keystone species for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and can be an early warning indicator of ecosystem health. Salmonids also have strong societal values and contribute enormously to regional economies and Native American cultures. Today, many native salmonid populations are small, highly fragmented, and isolated from genetic exchange, thereby increasing their vulnerability to disturbances due to their limited ability to adapt through migration. Rising global air temperatures are altering the characteristics of aquatic ecosystems worldwide, including freshwater in the United States. Understanding the vulnerability of aquatic species...
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Isaak, D, S. Wenger, E. Peterson, J. V. Hoef, C. Luce, D. Nagel, S. Hostetler, J. Dunham, J. Kershner, B. Roper, D. Horan, G. Chandler, S. Parkes, and S. Wollrab. 2015. NorWeST stream temperature model: Data structure, covariates, and applications. EPA Region 10 webinar. February 11.
Existing stream temperature data were compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks were applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the GNLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios were used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the GNLCC.FY2011Objectives: Develop a regional stream temperature model that incorporates important climate drivers, wildfire/riparian conditions, and geomorphic factors; Use the model to understand and predict...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, Aquatic Connectivity, British Columbia, Bull Trout, CA-1, All tags...
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Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.
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Existing stream temperature data will be compiled from numerous federal, state, tribal, and private sources to develop an integrated regional database. Spatial statistical models for river networks will be applied to these data to develop an accurate model that predicts stream temperature for all fish-bearing streams in the US portion of the NPLCC. Differences between model outputs for historic and future climate scenarios will be used to assess spatial variation in the vulnerability of sensitive fish species across the NPLCC.


    map background search result map search result map Rangewide Climate Vulnerability Assessment for Threatened Bull Trout The NorWeST Regional Stream Temperature Model for Mapping Thermal Habitats and Predicting Vulnerability of Aquatic Species to Climate Change Across the Great Northern LCC The Past as a Prelude to the Future: Assessing Climate Effects on Native Trout in the U.S. Developing a comprehensive interagency stream temperature database and high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios for the NPLCC Prioritizing restoration and enhancement of passage at stream-road crossings for aquatic vertebrates in the face of changing hydrologic regimes in the NPLCC An Applied Case Study to Integrate Climate Change into Design and Permitting of Water Crossing Structures River’s End: Mapping Patterns of Stream Drying in the Western United States Where the Stream Meets the Road: Prioritizing Culvert Replacement for Fish Passage - Thesis Identifying Resilient Headwater Streams to Mitigate Impacts of Future Drought in the Northwest The cold-water climate shield: delineating refugia for preserving salmonid fishes through the 21st century - Publication Final Report Developing a comprehensive interagency stream temperature database and high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios for the NPLCC Webinar Stream temperature database & high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios Webinar Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems Climate impacts on streamflows, thermal regimes, and the changing distribution of trout in the Great Basin NorWeST stream temperature model: Data structure, covariates, and applications Development and application of NorWeST stream temperature climate scenarios for the Pacific Northwest NorWeST modeled summer stream temperature scenarios for the western U.S. The NorWeST Regional Stream Temperature Model for Mapping Thermal Habitats and Predicting Vulnerability of Aquatic Species to Climate Change Across the Great Northern LCC NorWeST stream temperature model: Data structure, covariates, and applications Development and application of NorWeST stream temperature climate scenarios for the Pacific Northwest NorWeST modeled summer stream temperature scenarios for the western U.S. River’s End: Mapping Patterns of Stream Drying in the Western United States An Applied Case Study to Integrate Climate Change into Design and Permitting of Water Crossing Structures Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems Prioritizing restoration and enhancement of passage at stream-road crossings for aquatic vertebrates in the face of changing hydrologic regimes in the NPLCC Where the Stream Meets the Road: Prioritizing Culvert Replacement for Fish Passage - Thesis Webinar Identifying Resilient Headwater Streams to Mitigate Impacts of Future Drought in the Northwest Climate impacts on streamflows, thermal regimes, and the changing distribution of trout in the Great Basin Rangewide Climate Vulnerability Assessment for Threatened Bull Trout The cold-water climate shield: delineating refugia for preserving salmonid fishes through the 21st century - Publication Final Report Developing a comprehensive interagency stream temperature database and high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios for the NPLCC Stream temperature database & high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios Webinar Developing a comprehensive interagency stream temperature database and high-resolution NorWeST climate scenarios for the NPLCC The Past as a Prelude to the Future: Assessing Climate Effects on Native Trout in the U.S.