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Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
Mule deer within the Red Desert population, part of the larger Sublette herd, make the longest ungulate migration ever recorded in the lower 48 states (fig. 33). Here, mule deer travel an average one-way distance of 150 mi (241 km) from the Red Desert in the south to the Gros Ventre Range and Teton Range in the north. This migration originates in the desert sagebrush basins of the Red Desert area of southwest Wyoming where deer winter. In spring, an estimated 500 deer travel 50 mi (84 km) north across the desert to the west side of the Wind River Range. From there they merge with 4,000 to 5,000 other deer that winter in the foothills of the Wind River Range and then travel a narrow corridor along the base of the...
The Platte Valley Herd Corridor was designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2018 (fig. 30). The Platte Valley herd contains approximately 11,000 mule deer. The corridor is based on two wintering populations, including a south segment from Saratoga, Wyoming, to the Colorado State line, and a north segment from Saratoga to the Dana Ridge area north of I-80. Winter ranges in the Platte Valley are more dispersed than winter ranges in other parts of the state, so deer migrate in many different directions. Many deer in the southern segment follow the Platte River south to summer ranges in Colorado. Most deer migrations in the north radiate south and east from winter ranges along I-80. The WGFD collared 45...
Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
Mule deer in the Atlantic Rim South population are part of the Baggs herd unit that is managed for approximately 19,000 animals. These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins north and west of Baggs, Wyoming and migrate north and east 20–50 mi (32–80 km) to various summer ranges (fig. 23). Many of these deer must navigate coal-bed methane developments situated along the migration route between their seasonal ranges. In addition to navigating gas developments, many of these deer cross Highway 789 during winter and migration. The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) recently installed two underpasses and several mi of game-proof fencing to facilitate highway crossings across Highway 789 and help...
The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs along the east side of Highway 789. From there, deer migrate north and west to summer ranges on Atlantic Rim, the Sand Hills, and the head of Savery Creek. The southern segment occupies a larger sagebrush winter range on both sides of Highway 789, some of which extends into Colorado. These animals migrate north and west to summer ranges...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
The Platte Valley Herd Corridor was designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2018 (fig. 30). The Platte Valley herd contains approximately 11,000 mule deer. The corridor is based on two wintering populations, including a south segment from Saratoga, Wyoming, to the Colorado State line, and a north segment from Saratoga to the Dana Ridge area north of I-80. Winter ranges in the Platte Valley are more dispersed than winter ranges in other parts of the state, so deer migrate in many different directions. Many deer in the southern segment follow the Platte River south to summer ranges in Colorado. Most deer migrations in the north radiate south and east from winter ranges along I-80. The WGFD collared 45...
Mule deer in the Platte Valley North population are part of the larger Platte Valley herd unit with an estimated population of 11,000 animals (fig. 28). These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins near the Platte River north of Saratoga, Wyoming. Other segments of this population winter in the Chokecherry Knob area, south of Sinclair, and the Dana Ridge area just north of I-80. The migratory patterns of these deer are diverse and vary with each winter range. Deer in this part of the Platte Valley have a noticeably higher proportion of resident animals compared to the Platte Valley South population. For example, half of the mule deer near I-80 are residents. Improving the connectivity of deer migration...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs along the east side of Highway 789. From there, deer migrate north and west to summer ranges on Atlantic Rim, the Sand Hills, and the head of Savery Creek. The southern segment occupies a larger sagebrush winter range on both sides of Highway 789, some of which extends into Colorado. These animals migrate north and west to summer ranges...
The Ryegrass mule deer population is part of the larger Sublette herd that winters in the northwest portion of the Green River Basin, west of the Green River and north of Cottonwood Creek (fig. 34). In severe winters, these deer may travel southeast to The Mesa, Ross Ridge, or Reardon Draw areas. The Ryegrass region supports approximately 1,500 to 2,000 deer that migrate northwest to summer ranges in the Wyoming Range and Salt River Range. Many of these deer must traverse U.S. Highway 189, where deer-vehicle collisions are problematic. This stretch of highway is a top priority for underpass installation to improve both wildlife permeability and motorist safety. These data provide the location of migration routes...
Mule deer in the Platte Valley South population are part of the larger Platte Valley herd unit with an estimated population of 11,000 animals. These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins near the Platte and Encampment Rivers, south of Saratoga, Wyoming (fig. 29). Most of these deer migrate southerly 20–70 mi (32–113 km) to portions of the Sierra Madre, Medicine Bow Mountains, and Park Range in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming. Some of these deer move as far south as Rabbit Ears Range and must negotiate numerous fences, highways, and residential development to complete their migrations. These data provide the location of migration routes for mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in the Platte Valley...
Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
The Mesa mule deer population is part of the larger Sublette herd that winters in the north-central portion of the Green River Basin, east of the Green River and west of U.S. Highway 191 (fig. 32). The Mesa wintering area supports 3,000 to 5,000 deer that migrate northwest to summer ranges in the Wyoming Range, Gros Ventre Range, and Salt River Range. The Mesa winter range, which has been fragmented by a large natural gas field, has experienced 30–40 percent declines in deer abundance since this development began. Mitigating winter range impacts continues to be a challenge for managers. These migratory deer have benefited from six underpasses and two overpasses constructed along U.S. Highway 191 in 2012; the project...


map background search result map search result map Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Atlantic Rim South Population in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Mesa Population in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Platte Valley Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley North Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley South Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Red Desert Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Ryegrass Population in Wyoming Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Sublette Herd in Wyoming Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Baggs Herd in Wyoming Migration Corridors (WGFD Designated) of Mule Deer in the Platte Valley Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley North Population in Wyoming Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Ryegrass Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley South Population in Wyoming Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Atlantic Rim South Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Mesa Population in Wyoming Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers (WGFD) of Mule Deer in the Sublette Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Red Desert Population in Wyoming