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Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...
Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migration corridor for the Area 10 deer migration. The largest stopovers are located along the Harrison Pass Road on both sides of Toyn Creek,the west side of Pearl Peak and Sherman Mountain, Little and Big Bald Mountains near the Bald Mountain Mine complex, and Bourne to Orchard Canyons west of Warm Spring Ranch. The winter range encompasses...
Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the northern Independence Mountains and Bull Run Basin area. Some of the most important stopover areas are located near upper Rock Creek, Toe Jam Mountain, and Chicken Creek Summit. Challenges to this deer herd include past wildfires on winter range, conversion of native shrub habitats to exotic annual grasses, and lower primary production in some...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...
Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...


    map background search result map search result map Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Izzenhood Herd in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains in Nevada