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Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > USGS/FWS Science Support Partnership Program > SSP/QR FWSR4 > SSPQRFY19 ( Show all descendants )

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The Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis) is the most secretive of the secretive marsh birds and one of the least understood bird species in North America. The Eastern Black Rail (L. j. jamaicensis) is listed as endangered in five states along the Atlantic Coast and is under review for federal listing. Historical population size was likely in the tens of thousands but is now believed to be in the hundreds or low thousands (Watts 2016). Within the United States, Eastern Black Rails breed within three general geographic areas within the United States - the Atlantic Coast, the Gulf Coast and the Midwest-Great Plains. The Atlantic Coast has generally been considered to support the largest breeding population throughout...
Yellowcheek Darter (Etheostoma moorei) is a fish endemic to the Little Red River watershed in Arkansas (Fig. 1). As a result of threats, geographic isolation and declining abundance, the species was listed as endangered in 2011. Populations have declined, in part, due to intense seasonal stream drying and inundation of lower stream reaches (Fig. 1). It is hypothesized that in headwater streams where periodic drying is common, habitat selection influences Yellowcheek Darter distribution and abundance. Seasonal drought is typical in this region, and as drying occurs, individuals must move from riffles into neighboring pools, move into the hyporheic zone, migrate large distances to a persistent riffle, or perish. It...
Much of the focus of Red Knot research and conservation over the past twenty years has largely focused on just a few sites along the Atlantic flyway, primarily in the mid-Atlantic region. The major cause of the Red Knot population decline in the 1990’s through 2003 was mostly attributed to declining horseshoe crab numbers in Delaware Bay due to their overharvest for the commercial bait industry. Substantial focus has been placed on improving horseshoe crab populations through better horseshoe crab management in the Delaware Bay region and on improving horseshoe crab and shorebird habitat in Delaware Bay. This work has likely halted the decline in the numbers of Red Knots passing through Delaware Bay: populations...
Categories: Project; Tags: 2019, LCC, SSP-QR FWSR4
Nile monitors (Varanus niloticus), a large carnivorous lizard, are established in the C-51 Basin in Palm Beach County in close proximity to the Artur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Lox NWR, Figure 1). They were first sighted in 2007 and breeding was confirmed in 2011 (Ketterlin-Eckles et al. 2017). They have been confirmed as far east as I-95 along the C-51 and west to within 2 kilometers of Stormwater Treatment Area (STA) 1E. Nile Monitors are semi-aquatic habitat generalists and in their native range of sub-Saharan Africa are found in both freshwater and estuaries. In Florida, they are most often found along networks of vegetated canal banks. They are diet generalists consuming invertebrates,...
Categories: Project; Tags: 2019, LCC, SSP-QR FWSR4
This project will evaluate the resiliency of an aquatic community to a catastrophic event and the reestablishment of that community in Flat Creek above and below a potential movement barrier. Sampling methods will target life history stages of each species and the collection of habitat and geomorphic data (e.g., slope, water velocity, pool-to-pool spacing, pool depth, and channel substrate). These data will assist FWS and GDNR to evaluate (1) how quickly different aquatic guilds establish following species kills resulting from toxic pollutant spills, droughts or similar impacts; (2) which species/guilds’ re-colonization is inhibited by movement barriers; and (3) how re-colonization of this reach, where known habitat...
Categories: Project; Tags: 2019, LCC, SSP-QR FWSR4