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Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers > National CASC > FY 2015 Projects > Science to Action Fellowship: Supporting Graduate Students to Apply Science to Decision Making and Adaptation > Approved Products ( Show all descendants )

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_____Science to Action Fellowship: Supporting Graduate Students to Apply Science to Decision Making and Adaptation
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Brook trout, brown trout, and rainbow trout are distributed throughout streams in Michigan and support valuable recreational fisheries. Streams are projected to become warmer in the future due to climate change, but the effects of warming on growth, reproduction, and survival of these trout species are largely unknown. Understanding and predicting climate change impacts is important for developing management strategies that sustain healthy, fishable trout populations. The goal of this project was to design a user-friendly, map-based decision-support tool that combines stream-specific information on resource availability (e.g., money, time, personnel), temperature patterns, and other biological conditions to assist...
Water resource managers face the complex challenge of balancing water allocation between human and environmental needs. Declining water availability in many regions globally is driven by over- allocation and usage by municipal and agricultural users and climate-driven changes in rainfall. At the same time, environmental flows in rivers and streams that sustain fish and other aquatic life are decreasing for the same reasons. Because freshwater species’ populations are declining rapidly, it is increasingly important to balance between human and environmental water needs. However, there are significant barriers and socio-political issues that prevent water from being allocated to conserve freshwater ecosystems. This...
Perhaps once considered dry, unproductive and unremarkable landscapes, America’s rangelands are increasingly recognized as invaluable cultural and ecological systems as they become progressively threatened by climate change. Water scarcity and wildfire across the western United States is expected to increase in severity and frequency due to climate change (Schoennagel et al., 2017). The economies of rural rangeland communities rely on agriculture and recreation, and the semi-arid landscapes are home to unique ecological communities. With careful stewardship, rangelands maintain soils, watersheds and carbon storage, but poor management can degrade wildlife habitat and destroy biodiversity (McNeeley et al., 2017)....
Climate change will alter ecosystems worldwide and ultimately lead to changes in biological communities and loss of both aquatic and terrestrial biodiversity (Xenopolous et al. 2005, Thomas et al. 2004, Hari et al. 2006). In response to anticipated changes, management agencies are increasingly calling for development of proactive conservation strategies (Heller and Zavaleta 2009, Hagerman et al. 2010). On high elevation tropical Pacific Islands that support perennial streams, including the five main Hawaiian Islands, amphidromous stream organisms require continuous flows to facilitate their migration between stream and ocean habitats. In the Hawaiian Islands, rainfall sustains stream base flows (Lau and Mink 2006),...
Abstract (from ScienceDirect): Policies that mandate environmental flows (e-flows) can be powerful tools for freshwater conservation, but implementation of these policies faces many hurdles. To better understand these challenges, we explored two key questions: (1) What additional data are needed to implement e-flows? and (2) What are the major socio-political barriers to implementing e-flows? We surveyed water and natural resource decision makers in the semi-arid Red River basin, Texas-Oklahoma, USA, and used social network analysis to analyze their communication patterns. Most respondents agreed that e-flows can provide important benefits and identified the same data needs. However, respondents sharply in their...
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Relatively few studies have examined the social aspects of climate change in the US. Of that research, most have studied perceptions and public understanding (Akerlof, Maibach, Fitzgerald, Cedeno, & Neuman, 2013; Leiserowitz et al., 2015; van der Linden, 2015). For example, some visitor studies on place-based climate change have focused on perceptions and knowledge (Brownlee, 2012; Crona, Wutich, Brewis, & Gartin, 2013; De Urioste-Stone, Scaccia, & Howe-Poteet, 2015). Studies that measure the perception, knowledge, and awareness of climate change issues using park managers is virtually non-existent especially in a state with non-obvious climate change indicators (Garfin et al., 2011; Swim & Fraser, 2014; Thompson...
Playas contribute substantially to biodiversity in the Great Plains by providing habitat and food resources for migratory waterfowl and other wetland dependent species; however, the combination of sedimentation, land use alteration, and climate change threatens this primary function of the wetlands. Within a changing climate, alterations to playa hydro-periods will likely have severe consequences, as playa plants, animals, and nutrient cycling are dependent on regular inundation and drying cycles. Invertebrates, amphibians, and larger wildlife require very specific moisture conditions to proliferate and survive in playas, and plant communities in playas also depend on seasonal precipitation patterns. Thus, changes...