Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers > National CASC > FY 2009 Projects > Modeling the Response of Freshwater Mussels to Changes in Water Temperature, Habitat, and Streamflow > Approved Products ( Show all descendants )

14 results (8ms)   

Location

Folder
ROOT
_ScienceBase Catalog
__National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers
___National CASC
____FY 2009 Projects
_____Modeling the Response of Freshwater Mussels to Changes in Water Temperature, Habitat, and Streamflow
______Approved Products
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fwb.12290/abstract): Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) are a highly imperilled faunal group. One critical threat is thermal sensitivity, because global climate change and other anthropogenic activities contribute to increasing stream temperature and altered hydrologic flow that may be detrimental to freshwater mussels. We incorporated four benthic environmental components – temperature, sediment, water level (a surrogate for flow) and a vertical thermal gradient in the sediment column – in laboratory mesocosm experiments with juveniles of two species of freshwater mussels (Lampsilis abrupta and Lampsilis radiata) and tested their effects on survival, burrowing...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12179/abstract): Freshwater mussels (order Unionida) are a highly imperiled group of organisms that are at risk from rising stream temperatures ( T ). There is a need to understand the potential effects of land use (LU) and climate change (CC) on stream T and have a measure of uncertainty. We used available downscaled climate projections and LU change simulations to simulate the potential effects on average daily stream T from 2020 to 2060. Monte Carlo simulations were run, and a novel technique to analyze results was used to assess changes in hydrologic and stream T response. Simulations of daily mean T were used as input to our stochastic...
Abstract: The consequences of global climate change on aquatic ecosystems are predicted to result from altered intensity, variability, and distribution of precipitation, and more frequent flooding and droughts. In freshwater systems, these changes may result in degradation or loss of habitat due to dry stream beds or low flows, and increased water temperatures, pollution, and erosion. Freshwater mussels (Order Unionida) are especially vulnerable to disturbance because they are incapable of escaping detrimental changes at any practical temporal scale. Quantitative information on lethal temperatures (LT) to native freshwater mussels is currently limited to fewer than 10 species, and these few studies have been restricted...
Abstract: Freshwater mussels are among the most imperiled faunal groups globally, and relevant ecological information is urgently needed to guide their management and conservation in the face of global change. We explored the influence of species traits, host fishes, and habitat at three spatial scales (micro-, reach-, and catchment-scale) on the detection and occupancy of 14 species of freshwater mussels in the Tar River basin, North Carolina. Detection probability for all species was 0.42 (95% CI, 0.36 –0.47) with no species- or site-specific detection effects identified. Mean occupancy probability among species ranged from 0.04 (95% CI, 0.01 – 0.16) for Alasmidonta undulata, an undescribed Lampsilis sp., and...
Abstract: Rising environmental temperatures result from changes in land use and global climate and can cause significant shifts in the composition and distribution of species within communities. In freshwater systems, the larval life stage, glochidia, of Unionida mussels develops as an obligate parasite on host fish gills or fins before transforming into the juvenile stage and dropping to the sediment to complete the life cycle. Because of the relationship between freshwater mussels and their often specific host fish species, mussels are not only limited by their own variable thermal tolerances, but also by those of their host fish. Our intent was to compile data from available literature regarding thermal sensitivities...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jawr.12178/abstract): We developed a stochastic hourly stream temperature model (SHSTM) to estimate probability of exceeding given threshold temperature ( T ) for specified durations (24 and 96 h) to assess potential impacts on freshwater mussels in the upper Tar River, North Carolina. Simulated daily mean stream T from climate change (CC) and land-use (LU) change simulations for 2021-2030 and 2051-2060 were used as input to the SHSTM. Stream T observations in 2010 revealed only two sites with T above 30°C for >24 h and T s were never >31°C for more than 24 h at any site. The SHSTM suggests that the probability, P , that T will exceed 32°C for...
Summary (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fwb.12807/abstract) Conservation of freshwater unionid mussels presents unique challenges due to their distinctive life cycle, cryptic occurrence and imperilled status. Relevant ecological information is urgently needed to guide their management and conservation. We adopted a modelling approach, which is a novel application to freshwater mussels to enhance inference on rare species, by borrowing data among species in a hierarchical framework to conduct the most comprehensive occurrence analysis for freshwater mussels to date. We incorporated imperfect detection to more accurately examine effects of biotic and abiotic factors at multiple scales on the occurrence...
Abstract: Native freshwater mussels are in global decline and urgently need protection and conservation. Declines in the abundance and diversity of North American mussels have been attributed to human activities that cause pollution, waterquality degradation, and habitat destruction. Recent studies suggest that effects of climate change may also endanger native mussel assemblages, as many mussel species are living close to their upper thermal tolerances. Adult and juvenile mussels spend a large fraction of their lives burrowed into sediments of rivers and lakes. Our objective was to measure surface water and sediment temperatures at known mussel beds in the Upper Mississippi (UMR) and St. Croix (SCR) rivers to estimate...
thumbnail
Native freshwater mussels are a diverse but imperiled fauna and may be especially sensitive to increasing water temperatures because many species already may be living near their upper thermal limits. We tested the hypothesis that elevated water temperatures (20, 25, 30, and 35°C) adversely affected the survival and physiology of 2-mo-old juvenile mussels (Lampsilis abrupta, Lampsilis siliquoidea, and Megalonaias nervosa) in 28-d laboratory experiments. The 28-d LT50s (lethal temperature affecting 50% of the population) ranged from 25.3 to 30.3°C across species, and were lowest for L. abrupta and L. siliquoidea. Heart rate of L. siliquoidea was not affected by temperature, but heart rate declined at higher temperatures...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Freshwater Science
Abstract: Native freshwater mussels are long-lived, sessile, benthic invertebrates that may be extremely susceptible to elevated water temperatures because of their patchy distribution, limited dispersal and mobility, and larval dependence on fish. Recent research suggests that many species may be living close to their upper thermal limits and that some rivers have seen a shift in species composition to more thermally tolerant mussel species. We tested the hypothesis that elevated water temperatures (20, 25, 30, and 35°C) adversely affected the survival and physiology of juvenile mussels and physiology of adult mussels. In juveniles, the 28-d LT50s ranged from 25.3 to 30.3°C. H eart rate was significantly affected...


    map background search result map search result map The effects of elevated water temperature on native juvenile mussels: implications for climate change The effects of elevated water temperature on native juvenile mussels: implications for climate change