Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers > National CASC > FY 2008 Projects ( Show all descendants )

5 results (6ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The San Francisco Bay estuary contains the largest remaining expanse of tidal salt marshes in the western U.S. These marshes are home to a variety of federal and state protected species, such as the California clapper rail, California black rail, and the salt marsh harvest mouse. The estuary is also located on the Pacific Flyway, and is an important site for migrating and wintering birds. As climate conditions change, these salt marshes face a number of threats, including accelerated rates of sea-level rise, shifting precipitation, erosion, and more frequent and intense storms. Seas in the San Francisco Bay estuary have been rising 2.2 centimeters per decade, and could rise by as much as 1.24 meters by 2100, according...
thumbnail
Many ungulate populations in the Rocky Mountains are predicted to respond to declining snow levels and increased drought, though in ways that remain uncertain. This project investigated how climate change may affect the abundance of Rocky Mountain ungulates, their migration patterns, the degree to which they transmit diseases to livestock, and their herbivory impact on aspen. To complete this work we brought together a team of USGS and University scientists with experience, data, and strong agency collaboration that enabled us to quantify climate impacts and deliver products useful for wildlife managers.
thumbnail
Coastal rivers draining into the Gulf of Maine are home to the endangered Gulf of Maine Distinct Population Segment of Atlantic salmon. The Gulf of Maine population began to decline significantly by the late 19th century, leading to the closure of the commercial Atlantic salmon fishery in 1948. In recent years, populations have again begun to decrease again. State and federal fisheries biologists are concerned that climate-related changes in streamflow and temperature could impact salmon survival in these rivers. Projections of future climate conditions for the Northeast indicate warming air temperatures, earlier snowmelt runoff, and decreases in streamflow during the low flow period (summer). In the spring, snow...
thumbnail
Tens of millions of migratory birds are dependent on wetland and riparian stopovers in arid and semiarid regions of North America. Global climate change would superimpose even greater stress on these ecosystems as indicated by climate change model predictions of higher temperatures and less precipitation in the southwestern United States. In partnership with the University of Arizona, the Nebraska Cooperative Research Unit, and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USGS scientists have investigated (1) how climate change may alter the spacing and quality of critical wetland stopover habitats; (2) the sensitivities of migrating songbirds to loss of riparian forests due to climate change and water-use patterns; (3)...
thumbnail
Understanding how climate change will influence habitat for interior species of native salmonids is critical for effective management and recovery of these species. The US Department of the Interior, the US Department of Agriculture, state fisheries managers, and non-governmental organizations are increasingly challenged in attempting the recovery and restoration of native trout and salmon throughout their range. USGS scientists, in partnership with the US Forest Service and Trout Unlimited, completed a database including all existing species distributions and habitat information, and air and water temperature data for the interior West. Maps defining existing and projected future distributions of native salmonids,...


    map background search result map search result map The Potential Influence of Changing Climate on the Persistence of Native Salmonids Fate of Endangered Species in San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes with Sea-Level Rise Projected Impacts of Future Climate on Bird Conservation in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Quantifying the Influence of Climate Change on Rocky Mountain Ungulates Impact of Changes in Streamflow and Temperature on Endangered Atlantic Salmon Fate of Endangered Species in San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes with Sea-Level Rise Quantifying the Influence of Climate Change on Rocky Mountain Ungulates Impact of Changes in Streamflow and Temperature on Endangered Atlantic Salmon Projected Impacts of Future Climate on Bird Conservation in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions The Potential Influence of Changing Climate on the Persistence of Native Salmonids