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Spatial data depicting marsh types (e.g. fresh, intermediate, brackish and saline) for the north-central Gulf of Mexico coast are inconsistent across the region, limiting the ability of conservation planners to model the current and future capacity of the coast to sustain priority species. The goal of this study was to (1) update the resolution of coastal Texas vegetation data to match that of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, and (2) update vegetation maps for the Texas through Alabama region using current Landsat Imagery. Creating consistent regional vegetation maps will enable scientists to model vegetation response to and potential impacts of future climate change.
The Terrestrial Environmental Observation Network (TEON) is intended to meet the need for a sustainable environmental observing network for northern Alaska. The TEON plan proposes collection of a time series of specific environmental variables in seven representative watersheds across northern Alaska. The Kuparuk River watershed is central to this plan both because of its location that bisects Alaska’s North Slope and its record of hydroclimatic data and research now surpassing 30-yrs. Nested catchments within and adjacent to this sentinel Arctic river system integrate climate and landscape responses from the Brooks Range foothills (Imnavait Creek and Upper Kuparuk River) to the Arctic Coastal Plain (Putuligayuk...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: AIR TEMPERATURE, AIR TEMPERATURE, ATMOSPHERE, ATMOSPHERE, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarix (salt cedar). Biological control agents (beetles) will be introduced into the tamarix stands. Chemical controls will also be used to ensure stand removal. This project controls invasive species in riparian areas to reduce economic and ecological impacts. These impacts are especially acute in riparian ecosystems. This collaborative effort with Sweetwater County leverages available resources. 2008 Update: Four hundred (400) acres of weed treatments were applied, including the tamarisk and perennial pepperweed treatment along Little Bitter Creek and Red Creek. 2009 Update: The beetles for the biological control of the tamarix in the Bitter Creek...
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Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is essential for assessments of water balance and hydrologic responses to forest restoration treatments in uplands adjacent to the Desert LCC. As part of the Four Forests Restoration Initiative, a new paired watershed study is being planned to assess the hydrologic effects of mechanically thinning and restoring a more frequent fire regime to the ponderosa pine forests of Arizona. Water and energy balances will be measured and modeled in these paired watersheds to help inform and better plan for the hydrologic responses of future forest restoration actions. Researchers at Northern Arizona University have collected six years of eddy covariance measurements of ET in the...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, ATMOSPHERE, ATMOSPHERE, ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR, ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR, All tags...
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The importance of riparian ecosystems in semiarid and arid regions has generated interest in understanding processes that drive the distribution and abundance of dominant riparian plants. Changes in streamflow patterns downstream of dams have profoundly affected riparian vegetation composition and structure. For example, in the southwestern United States, flow regulation has contributed to the replacement of many riparian forests historically dominated by the native Populus fremontii (Fremont Cottonwood) and Salix gooddingii (Goodding’s Willow) by the exotic species Tamarix spp. (Salt Cedar). The proposed project will help guide reservoir release decision making to enhance downstream recruitment of native cottonwood...
The main goal of this project is to ensure that the 2011-13 climate change update to the Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Report (Baylands Goals) and other key, ongoing conservation activities in the San Francisco Bay region use the latest information about the current and future status of San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems, particularly in the context of sea-level rise. The main product of the project is the improved Sea Level Rise (SLR) Tool, specifically upgraded to inform the Baylands Goals Report update. The tool will continue to be available online at www.prbo.org/sfbayslr. All data layers going into the tool are and will continue to be downloadable from the site.
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This project links climate, hydrological, and ecological changes over the next 30 years in a Great Basin watershed. In recent years, climate variability on annual and decadal time scales has been recognized as greater than commonly perceived with increasing impacts on ecosystems and available water resources. Changes in vegetation distribution, composition and productivity resulting from climate change affect plant water use, which in turn can alter stream flow, groundwater and eventually available water resources. To better understand these links, project researchers implemented two computer-based numeric models in the Cleve Creek watershed in the Schell Creek Range, east of Ely, Nevada. The application of the...
The Circumboreal Vegetation Mapping (CBVM) group is a group of vegetation scientists within the Arctic Council’s CAFF Program devoted to mapping the vegetation of the entire circumboreal region. The aim of the CBVM project is to produce a vegetation map with geobotanical database and derived products for the entire boreal biome using a unified, international method for classifying and mapping boreal vegetation. In the proposed workshop we will focus on the Northwest Boreal LCC to unite it hierarchically with a vegetation map covering boreal North America and Eurasia. Our map of the Alaska boreal is currently being prepared for completion in December 2013. We will develop a process to integrate the Canadian portion...
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In California, the near-shore area where the ocean meets the land is a highly productive yet sensitive region that supports a wealth of wildlife, including several native bird species. These saltmarshes, mudflats, and shallow bays are not only critical for wildlife, but they also provide economic and recreational benefits to local communities. Today, sea-level rise, more frequent and stronger storms, saltwater intrusion, and warming water temperatures are among the threats that are altering these important habitats. To support future planning and conservation of California’s near-shore habitats, researchers examined current weather patterns, elevations, tides, and sediments at these sites to see how they affect...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, Bolinas Lagoon, CA, CASC, California, All tags...
The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) encompasses the southernmost, warmest parts of the arctic tundra biome and is renowned for its high biological productivity and large subsistence-based human population. Ice-rich permafrost currently is widespread and strongly influences terrestrial and aquatic habitats, including local topography, vegetation, soil hydrology, and the water balance of lakes. Ground temperatures are near the freezing point, however, and recent projections indicate that the YKD is poised for widespread loss of permafrost by the end of this century. This has implications for the region’s extensive and heretofore stable terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Tundra wildfire is a common ecological “pulse” disturbance...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2016, AK-00, Academics & scientific researchers, Academics & scientific researchers, Conservation NGOs, All tags...
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Topock Marsh is a large wetland adjacent to the Colorado River and main feature of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (Havasu NWR) in southern Arizona. In 2010, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Bureau of Reclamation began a project to improve water management capabilities at Topock Marsh and protect habitats and species. Initial construction required a drawdown, which caused below-average inflows and water depths in 2010-2011. Co-applicants Daniels and Haegele of FORT monitored Topock Marsh during the drawdown and immediately after, thus obtained information on immediate effects. However, stress from the drawdown may have a delayed effect on aquatic resources; additionally, significant changes to the infrastructure...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, AZ-04, Applications and Tools, Arizona, CA-08, All tags...
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The bison, which has long served as the symbol of the Department of the Interior, became the official national mammal of the United States in 2016. Bison played a key role in shaping the grasslands of the Great Plains for millennia, but today they are confined to unnaturally small ranges. National parks, including four in the Great Plains, provide a major last bastion for wild bison. Herds in Badlands National Park and Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota, Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas, and Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota are wild in that their movements are unconstrained within their park’s designated bison range, they receive no supplemental feed, minerals, or veterinary attention,...
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Fire in the western U.S. poses one of the greatest threats to human and ecological communities alike. In fact, fire management is the largest single expenditure of land management funds on federal lands. Now, climate change is altering wildfire patterns. Climate change in the West is creating warmer and drier conditions, resulting in an increase in the amount of dead vegetation available to fuel fires. This project sought to assess the vulnerability of forests in the southwestern U.S. to climate change and wildfire, in order to understand how these ecosystems might become altered as a result. Researchers (a) examined how climate change impacts wildfires in the region, to better understand fire risk; (b) identified...
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Overgrazing and fire suppression have led to a loss of deep soils and vegetative cover in the 420,000 acre Alamosa Creek watershed in southwestern New Mexico. Rain and snow melt are no longer held by the soils and released slowly, but run off in floods, resulting in catastrophic flows and severe erosion that contribute sediment to Elephant Butte Dam. The diverse community of farmers that irrigate 800 acres of valley land on 49 farms in Cañada Alamosa are looking to revive traditional and develop innovate new practices to maintain their way of life. Partnerships are required to design new land management practices between scientists and local land managers. This project is a component of a larger Alamosa Land Institute...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, Alamosa Creek, Cañada Alamosa Watershed, Conservation Design, Datasets/Database, All tags...
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Perennial streams in the Desert LCC support riparian trees such as cottonwood (Populus spp) and box elder (Acer negundo) that are critical components of habitat for riparian obligate birds and other wildlife species (Webb et al. 2007). Trees, snags, and fallen woody debris provide nesting and foraging sites for a variety of riparian animals (Bateman et al. 2008, Smith et al. 2012). Riparian trees require occasional floods to create space suitable for germination and are dependent on accessible groundwater for growth and survival (Lytle and Merritt 2004). Studies along the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico have shown that rates of woody debris accumulation are also influenced by hydrology because floods physically...
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Rivers in the SRLCC differ from one another in flow characteristics, levels of regulation, and vulnerability to wildfire; characteristics that will be influenced by climate change (Seager et al. 2007, Mortiz et al. 2012). An understanding of how changes in streamflow and wildfire frequency will affect structure of live and dead woody vegetation is needed to for managers assess the vulnerability of riparian obligate species to climate change. We are developing stochastic transition models for cottonwood trees and snags along the Middle Rio Grande by modifying Lytle and Merritts (2004) stage-structured cottonwood population model. By incorporating influences of flood and wildfire into stage transition rates, we can...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Conservation NGOs, Cultural Resources, Decision Support, EARTH SCIENCE > LAND SURFACE > LANDSCAPE, Federal resource managers, All tags...
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Despite the lack of surface flows, the Colorado River riparian corridor in Mexico has proven to be ecologically resilient. Floods in the 1980s and 90s in the region brought back large swaths of native riparian habitat, which still persist today in some areas along the river. Because the historic floodplain is extremely important for agricultural production and therefore the local economy, habitat maintenance must be integrated with continued utilization of lands and water for this purpose.The riparian, marsh, and open-water areas found in Reach 4 provide critical habitat for both migratory and resident riparian bird species. Due to its ecological importance, the riparian corridor and Reach 4 in particular have been...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service, ArcGIS Service Definition, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, Applications and Tools, Baja California, Colorado River Delta, DLCC, All tags...
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Riparian vegetation provides crucial habitat for wildlife and is a high conservation priority for land managers throughout the Southwest but a central scientific challenge is to generate quantitative predictions of how changes in water availability will affect the amount and quality of riparian wildlife habitat. Researchers will study areas that have long-term datasets available (i.e., hydrological, geomorphological, biological), that characterize a broad range of riparian conditions found in the Southwest. Building on recently developed models funded by the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC), this work will link various hydrologic, geomorphic and habitat models to better understand...
To inform management for a resilient and functioning landscape, we need to understand how the landscape is changing. The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative, working with a diverse group of managers and stakeholders, initiated development of a coordinated monitoring system for the northwest boreal ecoregion in 2016. The goal for the coordinated monitoring system is to provide a set of common denominators (i.e., minimum standards) that will allow cooperators to combine monitoring data to make landscape-scale inferences. The monitoring system is intended to detect landscape-scale changes related to climate change or human disturbance. This effort is intended to leverage limited monitoring resources...
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HawaiĘ»i is home to a rich diversity of native plants, about 90 percent of which are found nowhere else in the world. However, changing climate conditions may reduce the amount of suitable habitat for native plants and contribute to the spread of invasive plant species. The goal of this project was to better understand how Hawaiian native and invasive plants will respond to climate change. Scientists focused on 10 important native and five important invasive plant species, using over 35 years of data from thousands of locations in Hawai‘i to assess the plants’ preferred climate conditions and model their likely best future habitat based on climate change projections. The resulting maps and findings provide an initial...


    map background search result map search result map Bitter Creek Tamarix Removal Modeling Climate-Driven Changes to Vegetation in the Hawaiian Islands The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Mapping Fresh, Intermediate, Brackish and Saline Marshes in the North Central Gulf of Mexico Coast to Inform Future Projections Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Storms on California Coastal Habitats: Part 1 Understanding and Projecting Changes in Climate, Hydrology, and Ecology in the Great Basin for the Next 30 Years Modeling Woody Plant Regeneration and Debris Accumulation under Future Streamflow and Wildfire Scenarios in the SRLCC Development of a Decision Support Tool for Water and Resource Management using Biotic, Abiotic, and Hydrological Assessments of Topock Marsh Predicting Effects of Climate Change on Riparian Obligate Species in the Southwestern United States Aligning Ecological Restoration and Community Interests through Active Experimentation Assessing Evapotranspiration Rate Changes for Proposed Restoration of the Forested Uplands of the DLCC Modeling Woody Plant Regeneration and Debris Accumulation under Future Streamflow and Wildfire Scenarios in the DLCC Managing water and riparian habitats on the Bill Williams River with scientific benefit for other desert river systems Sustainability and Vulnerability of Colorado River Delta Riparian Habitat Under Different Climate Change, Environmental Flow, and Agricultural Water Management Scenarios Ecosystem Dynamics and Fate of Warm Permafrost after Tundra Wildfire and Lake Drainage on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta TEON: Terrestrial Environmental Observation Network Supporting the National Park Service Midwest Region Bison Management Plan Circumboreal Vegetation Mapping Understanding and Projecting Changes in Climate, Hydrology, and Ecology in the Great Basin for the Next 30 Years Ecosystem Dynamics and Fate of Warm Permafrost after Tundra Wildfire and Lake Drainage on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Aligning Ecological Restoration and Community Interests through Active Experimentation Managing water and riparian habitats on the Bill Williams River with scientific benefit for other desert river systems Supporting the National Park Service Midwest Region Bison Management Plan Modeling Woody Plant Regeneration and Debris Accumulation under Future Streamflow and Wildfire Scenarios in the DLCC Mapping Fresh, Intermediate, Brackish and Saline Marshes in the North Central Gulf of Mexico Coast to Inform Future Projections Predicting Effects of Climate Change on Riparian Obligate Species in the Southwestern United States Modeling Woody Plant Regeneration and Debris Accumulation under Future Streamflow and Wildfire Scenarios in the SRLCC Modeling Climate-Driven Changes to Vegetation in the Hawaiian Islands Assessing Evapotranspiration Rate Changes for Proposed Restoration of the Forested Uplands of the DLCC Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Storms on California Coastal Habitats: Part 1 TEON: Terrestrial Environmental Observation Network The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Circumboreal Vegetation Mapping