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This project evaluates the connections between climate change impacts and health in Bristol Bay communities. Climate change impacts were assessed through the lens of public health, with an eye towards the potential effects on disease, injury, food and water security, and mental health. Three focal communities were included in this assessment: Nondalton, a lake community, Levelock, a river community, and Pilot Point, a coastal community. The resulting assessment reports will be used to assist focal communities, as well as neighboring communities, in addressing climate-change related issues.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, COASTAL AREAS, COASTAL AREAS, Decision Support, All tags...
Western Alaska is one of the fastest warming regions on the globe and recent trends are expected to continue into the next century, likely having substantial effects on the aquatic resources of this region. While increased air temperatures will have direct effects on water temperatures, indirect effects due to changes in precipitation, groundwater characteristics, and flow regimes may have much larger effects on aquatic ecosystems. Coastal watersheds of Western Alaska are expected to receive 25-50% more snow and 18-25% more rain in the next century. Future “climate warming” may actually cool some streams if the ratio of snow to rain increases for coastal watersheds, while rain-dominated streams are likely to become...
This project evaluated the potential impacts of storm surges and relative sea level rise on nesting geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta). Habitat suitability maps for breeding waterbirds were developed to identify current waterbird breeding habitat and distributions. Short-term climate change impacts were assessed by comparing nest densities in relation to magnitude of storms that occurred in the prior fall from 2000-2013. Additionally, nest densities were modeled using random forests in relation to the time-integrated flood index (e.g., a storm specific measure accounting for both water depth and duration of flooding) for four modeled storms (2005, 2006, 2009, and...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: DELTAS, DELTAS, DUCKS/GEESE/SWANS, DUCKS/GEESE/SWANS, Decision Support, All tags...
The project will complete an extensive mapping of coastal change along the entire coastline of the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). The work will provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes over the past 41 years. The extent of change to the coastline and to coastal features, such as spits, barrier islands, estuaries, tidal guts and lagoons, is known to be substantial in some areas along the coast (e.g., portions of the Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta), although the extent of change along the full Bering Sea coast is not well documented. With this analysis, changes can be summarized for different land ownerships or other units to assess the extent of...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: BARRIER ISLANDS, BARRIER ISLANDS, COASTAL LANDFORMS/PROCESSES, COASTAL LANDFORMS/PROCESSES, DEGRADATION, All tags...
Water temperature plays a critical role in the health of pre-smolt salmon life stages, and changes in water temperature may be a strong driving factor on growth and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon. Climate is expected to warm substantially in the coming decades in western Alaska, potentially affecting juvenile salmon condition in freshwater habitats. This project investigates the variability in size-at-age and annual growth for juvenile Chinook salmon across the western Alaska landscape, the association of juvenile Chinook size-at-age or annual growth with spatial or temporal stream temperature gradients, and whether expected water temperature changes in western Alaska will affect juvenile Chinook salmon habitat...
This project uses previously collected ShoreZone imagery to map nearly 1,600 km of coastline between Wales and Kotzebue. With additional mapping supported by the Arctic LCC and National Park Service, this effort will complete the Kotzebue Sound shoreline, which will be included in the state-wide ShoreZone dataset. The complete ShoreZone dataset will be used to conduct a coastal hazards analysis and create maps that identify areas undergoing rapid coastal erosion and areas that are sensitive to inundation by storm surge and sea level rise.​
Permafrost thaw can be a major driver of landscape change. Regions in Western Alaska are highly vulnerable to such thawing due to the high ice content of the soils and the lack of thermal monitoring in this region has limited our ability to understand current thermal state and establish thawing rates. This study established a permafrost monitoring network in this region, providing a baseline of permafrost thermal regimes for assessing future change at a total of 26 automated monitoring stations. Stations have collected year-round temperature data from the active layer and the permafrost starting from the summer of 2011. The strong correspondence between spatial variability in permafrost thermal regime and an existing...
This project is focused on establishing a statewide framework to improve the hydrography mapping and stewardship in Alaska. This will be acheived through the creation of a statewide system to make digital mapping data updates accessible and affordable, and through the creation of a statewide hydrography mapping coordinator position to synchronize updates and guide hydrography mapping development. This framework will allow agencies and organizations to greatly improve their hydrography mapping data, as well as consume and uplift project level hydrography data that would not otherwise be incorporated.
Viable sockeye salmon populations are critical to the economy, culture, and freshwater ecosystems of Bristol Bay in Western Alaska, and it is unclear how populations might respond to warming temperatures during the critical life history stages of spawning and embryo incubation. The overarching goal of the project is to understand how temperature might influence population-specific patterns of embryo incubation, timing of hatching and fry emergence, and sockeye salmon embryo survival. By combining analyses of data from two large lake systems in the Kvichak watershed, laboratory rearing experiments to elucidate functional relationships, and simulation modeling, this project quantifies biological responses to changing...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DATA REFORMATTING, DATA REFORMATTING, All tags...
Concern about invasive species in Alaska is a growing concern, attracting attention from land managers, politicians and the public. Nearly half the new discoveries of invasive plants, animals, and insects in the state are reported by concerned individuals with a general interest in invasive species. The development of a mobile application for invasive plant identification and reporting will help enable the public to gather and share new invasive plant discoveries. This project will result in the development of a decision tool for identifying non-natives plant species, which will provide the foundation for the app. Project staff will also review user-submitted requests for identification assistance, review app-generated...
This project will produce an existing vegetation type map at 30m resolution for the entire Western Alaska LCC region. The lack of a consistently mapped vegetation data layer for Alaska has been identified as a primary road block for many conservation and management entities across the state. This project will address a number of the LCC conservation goals by addressing a baseline science need that is the foundation for current and future project within the region.
Nearshore bathymetry is a vital link that joins offshore water depths to coastal topography. Seamless water depth information is a critical input parameter for reliable storm surge models, enables the calculation of sediment budgets and is necessary baseline data for a range of coastal management decisions. Funding from the Western Alaska LCC resulted in the purchase of field equipment capable of shallow water measurements in rural settings, allowing collection of nearshore bathymetry around western Alaska communities.
Mid-winter icing events have the potential to lead to population declines of grazing caribou and to some species of small mammals due to reduced survival and reproduction associated with restricted access or lack of forage. Population-level effects of icing events remain unclear partly due to limited information on icing events in Alaska. The assessment results provide a baseline data set and remote sensing method, both of which have broad applicability, allowing the community of users to better understand the recent past, better link changes in ecological drivers and responses of wildlife populations, and aid in planning for the future.
This project provided systematic coastal habitat imagery and mapping for the Alaska Peninsula shoreline following the Alaska ShoreZone Mapping Protocol and made these products web-accessible. The completed mapping product is available on the ShoreZone website in a searchable dataset. Individuals and communities can query coastal habitat information for use in coastal zone planning. Mapped features include features such as shore types and morphology (e.g., dunes, beaches, and estuaries), intertidal biota (e.g., salt marshes, eelgrass beds, kelp beds) and man-made features (e.g., seawalls, docks). In addition to the dataset, the web-accessible, high resolution low-tide imagery (video and photos) complement the mapped...
Lack of complete snow cover for the past 3 winters in southwestern Alaska has forced agencies to postpone moose surveys due to the likelihood of underestimating the population/lack of comparability to previous surveys. Poor snow conditions lower the sightability of moose, yet, for most regions of Alaska, the variation in moose sightability during suboptimal conditions has not yet been quantified. Because scientists are predicting less snowfall in this region over the long term, we initiated research to estimate sightability correction factors (SCF_c) using radiocollared animals to apply to abundance estimates obtained via the GeoSpatial Population Estimator (GSPE) method. The Project Goal is to develop a model that...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2016, Academics & scientific researchers, Academics & scientific researchers, CALIBRATION/VALIDATION, CALIBRATION/VALIDATION, All tags...
This project uses existing ShoreZone coastal imagery to map 719 km of shoreline in Bristol Bay, from Cape Constantine to Cape Newenham. This section of coastline is an extremely important herring spawning area and an important component of the Bristol Bay fisheries. Intertidal and nearshore vegetation, on which herring spawn, will be catalogued as part of the ShoreZone mapping and, along with shore types, coastal substrate, and coastal biota, added to the state-wide ShoreZone dataset.​
Alaska’s freshwater resources, vitally important for salmon and other species, are vulnerable to changes resulting from climate change. Though temperature is a critical element in the suitability of aquatic habitats, Alaska’s stream and lake temperature monitoring is occurring through independent agencies/partners without a means to link and share data. Because a coordinated network of monitoring data can help scientists and managers understand how aquatic systems are responding to climate change, conducting an inventory of past and present stream and lake temperature monitoring efforts has been identified as a priority science need for Alaska. This project will consolidate existing monitoring site locations and...
The purpose of the research is to develop a storm surge model for the YK Delta area and to apply it to determine biological impacts of storm surges in the current and future climates. This research is needed as storm surges are expected to be more frequent and more severe in the YK Delta area due to climate change and sea level rise. The biological impacts in the YK Delta due to the changed storm surges could be extreme. With the model, we will study 10 storms over the 1980 – 2011 time period. Model output will be used to determine the recurrence interval for the individual storms. With the model output from individual storms, an inundation index (time-integral of water level during a storm) will be calculated....
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AREAS, ARCHAEOLOGICAL AREAS, Academics & scientific researchers, COASTAL AREAS, COASTAL AREAS, All tags...
This project supports the technical development of a mobile application for identifying and reporting invasive plant species in Alaska. It will result in a portable, digital version of a field guide that can be easily updated and that supports integration of reports into the Alaska Exotic Plants Information Clearinghouse (AKEPIC). Under development for both Android and iOS operating systems, the app has the potential to increase the public’s knowledge of invasive plants, as well an improve opportunities for reporting new occurrences. See also project WA2014_33.
Research on coastal change in Western Alaska has increased rapidly in recent years, making it challenging to track existing projects, understand their cumulative insights, gauge remaining research gaps, and prioritize future research. This project will identify existing coastal change projects in Western Alaska and synthesize information about each project. The resulting report will document the project landscape for communities facing change, decision-makers navigating change, researchers pursuing projects, as well as funding agencies trying to prioritize where to allocate resources.


map background search result map search result map Landscape-scale analysis of the relationship between juvenile Chinook size and growth and stream temperature in western Alaska (Feasibility Study) Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Alaska invasive plant identification and record input smartphone app Alaska Online Aquatic Temperature Site (AK-OATS) Temperature, phenology, and embryo survival in western Alaska sockeye salmon population: the potential for adaptation to a warming world? Storm Surge Impacts on Biological Resources in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta Watershed control of hydrologic sources and thermal conditions in SW Alaska streams: a framework for forecasting effects of changing climate Invasive plant identification and record input smartphone app for western Alaska Bringing Alaska's Freshwater Hydrography into the 21st Century The impacts of storm surges on breeding waterbirds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska: past effects and future projected impacts The impacts of storm surges on breeding waterbirds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska: past effects and future projected impacts Temperature, phenology, and embryo survival in western Alaska sockeye salmon population: the potential for adaptation to a warming world? Storm Surge Impacts on Biological Resources in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta Climate Change Health Assessments for Three Coastal, Riverine and Lake System Communities Alaska invasive plant identification and record input smartphone app Invasive plant identification and record input smartphone app for western Alaska