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A gull of the Subarctic and Arctic, the Sabine’s Gull, with its distinctive plumage, commonlynests in the Alaskan Arctic, often in association with Arctic Terns (Sterna paradisaea). Thisspecies typically nests near fresh water in swampy low-lying tundra, in tidal marshes, and onsmall coastal islands (Day et al. 2001). During the breeding season, aquatic insects and otherinvertebrates are their most important food items (Day et al. 2001). Sabine’s Gulls spend theirwinters offshore primarily in subtropical and tropical coastal upwelling zones (Day et al. 2001).The northern Alaska population estimate is rarely surveyed extensively. Two surveys in 1996indicate a population somewhere between 6,000 and 10,000 (Day et...
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Summary report titled “Development of Shorebird Distribution Maps for the North Slope of Alaska Using Geospatial Habitat Modeling: the First Step in Assessing Effects of Climate Change.” The report includes an Appendix that identifies data layers that were unavailable but would have been useful to include in the study.
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The Snow Goose is a common breeder in Arctic Alaska, typically nesting in small, densecolonies scattered near the coast. This species nests on flat tundra, near ponds, shallow lakes,streams, and islands in river deltas (Mowbray et al. 2000). During the breeding season, their dietis primarily vegetarian, eating both aquatic and drier tundra vegetation (Mowbray et al. 2000).For brood rearing, one of the more important habitats is salt affected tundra on islands in riverdeltas (J. Shook, pers. comm.). Most North Slope breeders winter in western North Americafrom British Columbia into California (Mowbray et al. 2000). Current Arctic Coastal Plainpopulation is estimated at approximately 9,000 with an increasing trend...
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Historically, available den habitat models have been based primarily on the presence of topographic features capable of capturing drifting snow. In any given season, however, the availability and precise location of snowdrifts of sufficient size to accommodate a bear den depends on the antecedent snowfall and wind conditions, and these vary from one year to the next. Thus, suitable topography is a necessary pre-condition, but is not sufficient to accurately predict potential den sites in a given year.To satisfy the requirements of agency and industry managers what is needed is a user-friendly decision-support tool that takes into account the current fall and early-winter meteorological conditions, and provides den...
The primary goal of this project was to predict climate-related changes in the timing and duration of insect prey availability for arctic-breeding shorebirds. Researchers coordinated closely with the Arctic Shorebird Demographics Network, whose collaborators sampled aquatic insect emergence, terrestrial insect activity, and associated environmental data at sites across arctic Alaska and Canada. Using ASDN data, they developed mathematical models that relate the timing and duration of insect emergence and activity to accumulated temperature, weather, and other environmental variables. They used these models to predict future changes in the timing of arctic insect availability based on climate change projections....
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The Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska project (IEM) uses down-scaled climate models as the drivers of ecosystem change to produce forecasts of future fire, vegetation, permafrost and hydrology regimes at a resolution of 1km. This effort is the first to model ecosystem change on a statewide scale, using climate change input as a major driving variable. The objectives of the IEM project are as follows; to better understand and predict effects of climate change and other stressors on landscape level physical and ecosystem processes, and to provide support for resource conservation planning.The IEM will provide resource managers with a decision support tool to visualize future landscapes in Alaska. Model outputs...
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The Red Knot, roselaari subspecies, is a relatively uncommon breeding shorebird in ArcticAlaska. They typically nest in coastal alpine habitats, preferring sparsely vegetated and broadalpine ridgelines and dome tops (Harrington 2001, J. Johnson, pers. comm.). There is littleinformation on breeding season diet in this species however; field observations suggest a varieddiet from insects to plant materials (e.g., lichens, leaves, berries) (Harrington 2001). During May,knots occur in coastal lagoons adjacent to suitable nesting habitats. These lagoons apparentlyserve as foraging and resting sites preceding dispersal to nesting areas (J. Johnson, pers. comm.).This subspecies winters at sites along the Pacific Coast...
In Alaska, changes in snow, ice, and weather, have resulted in risks to human lives, infrastructure damage, threats to valuable natural resources, and disruption of hunting, fishing, and livelihoods.Leaders from the Aleutians to the Chukchi Sea came together for a series of Coastal Resilience and Adaptation Workshops, spearheaded by three Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association. Tribal leaders, resource managers, community planners, and scientists explored strategies to adapt to these unprecedented changes.The workshop series brought together 14 Organizing Partners 34 Tribes, 15 State & Federal Agencies, and a total of more than 200 participants to meet in four regional...
Categories: Data, Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, Aleutian Bering Sea Islands LCC data.gov, CLIMATE ADVISORIES, CLIMATE ADVISORIES, CLIMATE INDICATORS, All tags...
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Researchers from the Manomet Center for ConservationSciences combined field observations of shorebirds withmapped physical and ecological parameters to develop a series ofspatially dependent habitat selection models that predict thecontemporary distribution of shorebird species across the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska.
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The Whimbrel is one of the larger breeding shorebirds in Arctic Alaska, occurring in both taigaand tundra habitats. In Arctic Alaska, this species nests in a variety of tundra habitats rangingfrom lowland wet polygonal to well-drained moist upland tundra, sometimes with significantshrub cover
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The Semipalmated Sandpiper is likely the most abundant breeding shorebird on the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska, with the highest densities occurring in the western portion of the coastalplain (Johnson et al. 2007). In Arctic Alaska, this species nests in a range of upland dry to moistand wet tundra habitats near water and typically focus their foraging along marsh and pond edges(Gratto-Trevor 1992). The current North American population estimate is 2 million (Morrison etal. 2006). While the Alaska breeding population appears to be stable, there is evidence thateastern Semipalmated Sandpiper populations are declining (Andres et al. 2012).
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To better understand and predict effects of climate change on wetlands, invertebrates and shorebirds, the ‘CEWISH’ group,composed of Cryohydrology, Invertebrate, Shorebird Food Use, and Shorebird/Population Modeling teams, collected fielddata at Barrow, Alaska, between May and September 2014–2015. The Cryohydrology team measured end-of-wintersnow accumulation, snowmelt at the landscape scale, pond water levels, and pond water and sediment temperatures. TheInvertebrate team monitored emergence at historic ponds, and documented emergence rates of dominant chironomid taxaunder different experimentally controlled thermal regimes. The Shorebird Food Use team developed a DNA library ofpotential prey items using samples...
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The Ruddy Turnstone, named after its habit of turning over stones and other objects in search ofprey, occurs throughout the circumpolar arctic. In Alaska, this species typically nests in barrenhalophytic, sparsely vegetated sites (Bart et al. 2012, Nettleship 2000), usually near the coast oralong rivers, and rarely inland (Johnson et al. 2007). During the breeding season, RuddyTurnstones feed primarily on dipteran insects obtained in dry to wet habitats near ponds andstreams and often along pond margins (Nettleship 2000). This species winters along both coastsof North America in the west from northern California down into South America (Nettleship2000). Current population estimate for Alaska is 20,000 (Morrison...
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The Dunlin (arcticola subspecies) is a common breeding bird in Arctic Alaska from the areasurrounding Barrow to the east. The pacifica subspecies also occurs within the Arctic LCCassessment area in the region around Cape Lisburne and Cape Krusenstern. Dunlin use a widevariety of breeding habitats found in the northern sub-arctic and arctic. On the Arctic CoastalPlain of Alaska, C. a. arcticola breed in moist-wet tundra, often in areas with ponds, polygons,and strangmoor landforms (Warnock and Gill 1996). The arcticola subspecies winters in Asiawhile pacifica winters along the west coast of North America. Current population estimate is 1.3million (arcticola: 750,000, pacifica: 500,000; Morrison et al. 2006) with...
The Yellow-billed loon Geodatabase is a compilation of Yellow-billed loon observations and survey data. This database is intended to be a qualitative “first look” at where loons have been found and where surveys have been conducted. This dataset is intended for general planning and mapping purposes, it should NOT be used for deriving density estimates. The dataset is available either as an ESRI ArcGIS 10.1 file geodatabase or as a shapefile with associated tables.
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The Common Raven is wide-ranging throughout much of North America utilizing a variety ofhabitats from deserts in the southwestern U.S. to tundra habitats in Arctic Alaska (Boarman andHeinrich 2000). Historically, this species did not nest in the northern portion of the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska but with the growing human presence in the region, particularly from oildevelopment activities, they have been able to utilize human structures for nesting (Johnson andHerter 1989, Day 1998). Ravens are a generalist species and take advantage of a wide variety ofprey and are a noted nest predator. Although some individuals may move south in the winter,many remain on the coastal plain (Johnson and Herter 1989). The global...
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The Stilt Sandpiper is an uncommon to common breeding shorebird on the Arctic Coastal Plainof Alaska that typically nests near the coast from the Canadian border to the Barrow area(Johnson et al. 2007, Klima and Jehl 2012). Highest known breeding densities occur in ArcticCanada where they often nest in taiga and boreal habitats
The Shorebird Demographic Network is an international collaboration designed to evaluate how climate mediated changes in the arctic ecosystem are affecting shorebird distribution, ecology, and demography. The main purpose of the network is to monitor demographic parameters (e.g. nest success, adult survival) of widely distributed shorebirds, so that we may develop conservation strategies that tackle the most pressing problems facing these declining species. The Arctic LCC contribution adds monitoring components that track key environmental attributes (e.g. water and prey availability) that are expected to link climate with changing shorebird populations.This project attempted to evaluate portions of two conceptual...
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The Pacific Loon is the most common breeding loon in Arctic Alaska, nesting throughout muchof the state (Russell 2002). This species typically breeds on lakes that are ≥1 ha in size in bothboreal and tundra habitats. They are primarily piscivorous although they are known to commonlyfeed chicks invertebrates (D. Rizzolo and J. Schmutz, unpublished data). Many Pacific Loonsspend their winters in offshore waters of the west coast of Canada and the U.S. (Russell 2002).The most recent Alaska population estimate is 100-125,000 individuals (Ruggles and Tankersley1992) with ~ 69,500 on the Arctic Coastal Plain specifically (Groves et al. 1996).
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The Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska is a compilation of spectacled and StellerÓł eider data. This database is intended to be a qualitative “first look” at where spectacled and StellerÓł eiders have been found and where surveys have been conducted. This dataset is intended for general planning and mapping purposes, it should NOT be used for deriving density estimates. The dataset is available either as an ESRI ArcGIS 10 file geodatabase or as a shapefile with associated tables.


map background search result map search result map ASDN: a Network of Sites to Evaluate How Climate-mediated Change in the Arctic Ecosystem are Affecting Shorebird Distribution, Ecology, and Demography SnowDens-3D User Documentation Final Report Narrative to National Fish and Wildlife Fund:  Climate, Wetlands and Waterbirds Interdisciplinary Project Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Shorebird Habitat Suitability Summary Report Whimbrel Stilt Sandpiper Semipalmated Sandpiper Dunlin Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska, 2012 Edition Ruddy Turnstone Red Knot Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada (COPY) Common Raven Pacific Loon Sabine's Gull Snow Goose Climate effects on Arctic Food Resources: Modeling the Timing and Duration of Aquatic Insect Emergence from Tundra Ponds SnowDens-3D User Documentation Final Report Narrative to National Fish and Wildlife Fund:  Climate, Wetlands and Waterbirds Interdisciplinary Project Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Shorebird Habitat Suitability Summary Report Whimbrel Stilt Sandpiper Semipalmated Sandpiper Dunlin Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska, 2012 Edition Ruddy Turnstone Red Knot Common Raven Pacific Loon Sabine's Gull Snow Goose Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada (COPY) ASDN: a Network of Sites to Evaluate How Climate-mediated Change in the Arctic Ecosystem are Affecting Shorebird Distribution, Ecology, and Demography Climate effects on Arctic Food Resources: Modeling the Timing and Duration of Aquatic Insect Emergence from Tundra Ponds