Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: biota (X) > partyWithName: Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (X) > Types: OGC WFS Layer (X) > partyWithName: LCC Network Data Steward (X)

106 results (54ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
More information is needed about species composition, abundance, or distribution of the microfauna and meiofauna living within the interstitial spaces of the littoral zones along the Beaufort Sea coast. Shorebirds depend on meiofauna for food for pre-migratory fattening and these organisms make important contributions to bioremediation of oil spills.The information obtained from this jointly-funded research can contribute to development of mitigation measures and strategies to reduce potential impacts from post-lease exploration and development. This information need extends to the lower trophic levels forming the base of these complex food webs and the biochemistry that influences these relationships. Their contributions...
thumbnail
The Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska is an important region for millions of migrating and nesting shorebirds. However, this region is threatened by climate change and increased human development (e.g., oil and gas production) that have the potential to greatly impact shorebird populations and breeding habitat in the near future. Because historic data on shorebird distributions in the ACP are very coarse and incomplete, we sought to develop detailed, contemporary distribution maps so that the potential impacts of climate-mediated changes and development could be ascertained. To do this, we developed and mapped habitat suitability indices for eight species of shorebirds (Black-bellied Plover [Pluvialis squatarola],...
thumbnail
Many Arctic shorebird populations are declining, and quantifying adult survival and the effects of anthropogenic factorsis a crucial step toward a better understanding of population dynamics. We used a recently developed, spatially explicitCormack–Jolly–Seber model in a Bayesian framework to obtain broad-scale estimates of true annual survival rates for 6species of shorebirds at 9 breeding sites across the North American Arctic in 2010–2014. We tested for effects ofenvironmental and ecological variables, study site, nest fate, and sex on annual survival rates of each species in thespatially explicit framework, which allowed us to distinguish between effects of variables on site fidelity versus truesurvival. Our...
thumbnail
The Red-throated Loon is the smallest of the world’s five loon species. This species typicallybreeds in low wetlands in both tundra and forested terrain (Barr et al. 2000). They nest on pondedges, sometimes along very small ponds (<1 ha), particularly in parts of their range sympatricwith Pacific Loons (Barr et al. 2000). Red-throated Loons are unique in that they regularlyforage on fish away from their nesting ponds.In Arctic Alaska this often involves flights to theArctic Ocean (Andres 1993). Like Yellow-billed Loons, the North American breedingpopulation, north of 68° latitude, appear to winter primarily in East Asia from the western KurilIslands to the Yellow Sea (J. Schmutz et al., unpublished data). In 1993,...
thumbnail
The Peregrine Falcon is one of the most ubiquitous bird species with a breeding distributionranging from tundra to the tropics. In Arctic Alaska this bird’s breeding stronghold is found inmajor river systems where cliff ledges abound and serve as preferred nesting sites. PeregrineFalcons prey on a wide variety of bird species ranging from small passerines to medium-sizedducks and will also take small mammals (White et al. 2002). This species travels widely andArctic-breeding Peregrine Falcons make some of the longest migrations of any bird species. TheNorth American subspecies (tundrius) winters in Central and South America (White et al. 2002).The global population is estimated at ~1.2 million individuals (BirdLife...
thumbnail
Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) willdevelop a model that examines the relationship betweenmeasured steam flow and surface water connectivity betweensummer feeding and overwintering habitats for fish on theNorth Slope.
This project provides a better understanding how linkages among surface-water availability, connectivity, and temperature mediate habitat and trophic dynamics of the Fish Creek Watershed (FCW). These interrelated processes form a shifting mosaic of freshwater habitats across the landscape that can be classified, mapped, understood, and modeled in response to past and future climate and land-use change in a spatial and temporal context. Developing scenarios of freshwater habitat change in this context provides managers and scientists with a flexible template to evaluate a range of potential responses to climate and land-use change. Applying this approach in the FCW is made feasible because of the availability of...
Using a bioclimatic envelope approach, University of Alberta investigators project how the distribution and abundance of boreal forest birds across North America will respond to different scenarios of future climate-change. Investigation emphasis is on mapping and quantifying potential range expansions of boreal bird species into Arctic and subarctic regions across Alaska and Canada. The final products demonstrate a broad continental-scale overview of potential shifts in avian distribution.
The Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska project (IEM) uses down-scaled climate models as the drivers of ecosystem change to produce forecasts of future fire, vegetation, permafrost and hydrology regimes at a resolution of 1km. This effort is the first to model ecosystem change on a statewide scale, using climate change input as a major driving variable. The objectives of the IEM project are as follows; to better understand and predict effects of climate change and other stressors on landscape level physical and ecosystem processes, and to provide support for resource conservation planning.The IEM will provide resource managers with a decision support tool to visualize future landscapes in Alaska. Model outputs...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, DYNAMIC VEGETATION/ECOSYSTEM MODELS, DYNAMIC VEGETATION/ECOSYSTEM MODELS, Datasets/Database, Federal resource managers, All tags...
Arctic wetlands, where millions of local and migratory birds nest, are composed of a mosaic of ice wedge polygons, non-patterned tundra, and large vegetated drained thaw lake basins. Regional climate projections suggest that evapotranspiration, rainfall, and snowfall will increase, making it difficult to predict how surface water distribution might change and how habitats for the invertebrate resources used by waterbirds will be impacted. This study will focus on evaluating how climate change will affect the invertebrate community, and whether the change in climate (through changes in hydrology and surface energy balance) could induce a trophic mismatch that might alter the growth and survival of shorebird young....
thumbnail
Temperatures are warming fastest at high latitudes and annual temperatures have increased by 2-3˚ C in the Arctic over the second half of the 20th century. Shorebirds respond to cues on their overwintering grounds to initiate long migrations to nesting sites throughout the Arctic. Climate-driven changes in snowmelt and temperature, which drive invertebrate emergence, may lead to a lack of synchrony between the timing of shorebird nesting and the availability of invertebrate prey essential for egg formation and subsequent chick survival. We modeled the biomass of invertebrates captured in modified Malaise traps as a function of accumulated temperature and weather variables for eight North American research camps...
thumbnail
The Brant is a small goose well known in Alaska for the tens of thousands of individuals thatmolt in the Teshekpuk Lake area of the coastal plain during the late summer. In ArcticAlaska, this species typically nests within 8 km of the coast although in the NationalPetroleum Reserve – Alaska (NPR-A) can nest up to 30 km inland (Reed et al. 1998, D.Ward, pers. comm.). Brant often nest in colonies near the upper edge of salt marshes alongsloping seacoasts or on estuarine deltas, although in areas where salt marshes are lesscommon, they will be more dispersed, nesting near small ponds and freshwater marshes (Reedet al. 1998). Brant subsist on a vegetarian diet and during breeding primarily focus on just afew species...
thumbnail
The Snow Bunting is one of the first birds to return to their Arctic breeding grounds, with malesarriving in early April. This species occurs throughout the circumpolar arctic and, as a cavitynester,will use human-made nest sites (e.g. barrels, buildings, pipelines) as readily as naturalones (rock cavities, under boulders, cliff faces; Lyon and Montgomerie 1995). Snow Buntingsconsume a wide variety of both plant (e.g. seeds, plant buds) and animal prey (invertebrates).Their wintering range is centered in the northern continental US and southern Canada although itextends north into the low arctic in some places (Lyon and Montgomerie 1995). Current globalpopulation estimate is 40 million (Rich et al. 2004).
thumbnail
Climate models project the rapid warming of boreal and arctic regions of NorthAmerica. This has led to predictions that boreal forest vegetation and fauna will track these changes andshift northward into the arctic over the next century. We used a comprehensive dataset of avian pointcountsurveys from across boreal Canada and Alaska, combined with the best-available interpolatedclimate data, to develop bioclimatic niche models of current avian distribution and density for 102 nativespecies of forest songbirds. We then used a downscaling of projected climates in future periods (2011–2040, 2041–2070, 2071–2100) to assess the potential for these species to shift their ranges and increasetheir abundance across North...
thumbnail
The Common Redpoll is an abundant finch of northern regions around the world. Redpolls occurthroughout Alaska, thriving in habitats ranging from boreal to tundra across a wide elevationgradient (Knox and Lowther 2000). This species nests in trees when available. In tundra habitats,they nest in willows (primarily along riparian areas) or on the ground (Knox and Lowther 2000,J. Liebezeit, unpublished data). While primarily a seed eater, in summer this species consumesarthropods to feed young (Knox and Lowther 2000). Common Redpolls winter as far north as theBrooks Range but will wander further south in irruptive years when seed-crop production fails(Knox and Lowther 2000). While their global population numbers in...
thumbnail
The Rock Ptarmigan is a common breeding bird in Arctic Alaska and, like the WillowPtarmigan, is one of the few birds that remain in the Arctic year-round. This species typicallybreeds in habitats that include a mix of rocky outcrops, graminoid meadows, and small patchesof Salix or Betula less than 1 m in height (Montgomerie and Holder 2008). Unlike the WillowPtarmigan, this species is less dependent on shrubs associated with riparian areas. In summer,Rock Ptarmigan consume a variety of foods including Dryas, Oxytropis, and Salix leaves,insects, Betula and Salix catkins, and berries (Montgomerie and Holder 2008). This specieswinters mainly within the breeding range but withdraws from the northernmost regions(Montgomerie...
thumbnail
These raster datasets represent output from the Boreal ALFRESCO (Alaska Frame Based Ecosystem Code) model. Boreal ALFRESCO operates on an annual time step, in a landscape composed of 1 x 1 km pixels, a scale appropriate for interfacing with mesoscale climate and carbon models. The last four digits of the file name specifies the year represented by the raster. For example a file named Age_years_historical_1990.tif represents the year 1990. Cell values represent the age of vegetation in years since last fire, with zero (0) indicating burned area in that year. Coverage of this dataset includes much of the state of Alaska (but does exclude Southeastern AK, Kodiak Island, portions of the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian...
thumbnail
The Greater Scaup is the only diving duck in the genus Aythya that has a circumpolardistribution. In Alaska this species has its highest nesting densities in the Yukon-KuskokwimDelta but they also breed in Arctic Alaska throughout the Brooks Range, foothills and ArcticCoastal Plain. Its breeding habitat is typically characterized by relatively shallow (1–2 m) lakesand large ponds with low surrounding vegetation in extensive, largely treeless, wetlands (Kesselet al. 2002). Greater Scaup have an omnivorous diet but tend to focus on more protein-richanimal foods (mostly aquatic invertebrates) during the summer. This species winters primarily inmarine waters of both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts (Kessel et al. 2002)....
thumbnail
The King Eider, conspicuous for the male’s elegant plumage, is a common nester on the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska. King Eiders typically nest in wet lowland tundra with many small pondsand pools, islands, and wet marshes. Dry tundra is also used when small lakes and ponds areavailable nearby as foraging areas (Powell and Suydam 2012). Unlike other eiders, this species isnot as closely tied to coastal breeding habitats. During the breeding season, their diet is primarilyomnivorous (Powell and Suydam 2012). Alaskan breeders spend their winters in marineenvironments mostly in the Bering Sea and along the Aleutians (Powell and Suydam 2012).Eider populations have declined since the 1970s (Powell and Suydam 2012). Current...


map background search result map search result map Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada FishCAFE: Response of an Arctic Freshwater Ecosystem to Climate and Land-use Change Environmental and ecological conditions at Arctic breeding sites have limited effects on true survival rates of adult shorebirds Interdisciplinary Study of How Climate Change May Affect Wetland Habitats, Invertebrates and Shorebirds Appendices from the Changing Climate-Biomes Final Report Predicting breeding shorebird distributions on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska Stand Age Projections Climate and Fish Migration Factsheet Peregrine Falcon Rock Ptarmigan Snow Bunting Modeling Avifaunal Responses Executive Summary Common Redpoll Climate Effects on Arctic Food Resources: Retrospective Analysis of Rate of Advancement of Invertebrate Phenology Red-throated Loon Greater Scaup Brant King Eider Modeling avifaunal responses to climate change in North America's boreal-Arctic transition zone Shorebirds and Invertebrate Distribution on Delta Mudflats along the Beaufort Sea Climate and Fish Migration Factsheet FishCAFE: Response of an Arctic Freshwater Ecosystem to Climate and Land-use Change Shorebirds and Invertebrate Distribution on Delta Mudflats along the Beaufort Sea Interdisciplinary Study of How Climate Change May Affect Wetland Habitats, Invertebrates and Shorebirds Predicting breeding shorebird distributions on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska Peregrine Falcon Rock Ptarmigan Snow Bunting Common Redpoll Red-throated Loon Greater Scaup Brant King Eider Appendices from the Changing Climate-Biomes Final Report Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada Stand Age Projections Environmental and ecological conditions at Arctic breeding sites have limited effects on true survival rates of adult shorebirds Climate Effects on Arctic Food Resources: Retrospective Analysis of Rate of Advancement of Invertebrate Phenology Modeling Avifaunal Responses Executive Summary Modeling avifaunal responses to climate change in North America's boreal-Arctic transition zone