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Addressing knowledge gaps to better protect unique landforms and their wealth of hidden biodiversity.
Elizabeth Byers and Sam Norris. 2011. Climate change vulnerability assessment of species of concern in West Virginia. West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Elkins, WV.This project assessed and ranked the relative climate change vulnerability of 185 animal and plant species in West Virginia.
County distribution for the climate change vulnerability of 41 newly assessed species is available for download. The entire package is available at the link provided.
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The Data Needs Assessment research project was undertaken to review the variety of resources on conservation planning to provide packages of products, data, and identified data gaps to improve conservation planning in the Appalachian LCC. A suite of core conservation planning products and data from principal investigators at Clemson University are now available to the Cooperative.“Deliverables from this research include:An analysis of State Wildlife Action Plans in the Appalachian LCC that describe how information contained in these plans can be linked to integrate state and local-scale efforts into a regional conservation framework;A list of 21 conservation planning tools, describing function and relevance of each...
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All Conservation Design Elements identified through a multi-year conservation planning effort undertaken by the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC). These elements were identified by the program Marxan as meeting collective conservation targets. Datasets include a merged design of all five elements, individual element shapefiles, and a prioritization shapefile (Conservation Design elements outlined by the NatureScape Design that were then placed into a prioritization framework based on Margulis and Pressy 2000).
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The capacity of ecosystems to provide services such as carbon storage, clean water, and forest products is determined not only by variations in ecosystem properties across landscapes, but also by ecosystem dynamics over time. ForWarn is a system developed by the U.S. Forest Service to monitor vegetation change using satellite imagery for the continental United States. It provides near real-time change maps that are updated every eight days, and summaries of these data also provide long-term change maps from 2000 to the present.Based on the detection of change in vegetation productivity, the ForWarn system monitors the effects of disturbances such as wildfires, insects, diseases, drought, and other effects of weather,...
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WaSSI (Water Supply Stress Index) predicts how climate, land cover, and human population change may impact water availability and carbon sequestration at the watershed level (about the size of a county) across the lower 48 United States. WaSSI users can select and adjust temperature, precipitation, land cover, and water use factors to simulate change scenarios for any timeframe from 1961 through the year 2100.Simulation results are available as downloadable maps, graphs, and data files that users can apply to their unique information and project needs. WaSSI generates useful information for natural resource planners and managers who must make informed decisions about water supplies and related ecosystem services...
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This shapefile represents The Nature Conservancy’s (TNC) “essential forests” and “key connectors” in the Central Appalachians Whole System. Essential Forests are built around groups of large forest patches, ecoregional portfolio roll-up sites, and areas with high local integrity and high flow density (from M. Anderson’s resiliency analysis). Key Connectors provide physical linkages among essential forests, have high flow density, and may also include large forest patches and matrix blocks. The polygons were originally delineated by TNC staff at a workshop near Petersburg, West Virginia, on March 9 and 10, 2011. The boundaries were hand-drawn on paper maps and then hand-digitized by A. Watland (TNC-VA) and T. Gagnolet...
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Provisional Tennessee State Wildlife Action Plan (TN-SWAP) terrestrial habitat priorities versus results of the population growth model developed by the Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, 2008, converted to percent projected developed landcover in the year 2040. Spatial growth model was developed using population growth projections from the University of Tennessee Center for Business and Economic Research (UT-CBER), county urban growth boundaries, 2000 census blocks, and various ancillary datasets.
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The Appalachians are a landscape filled with globally-significant biological diversity and cultural resources that provides essential benefits to large cities and surrounding human communities. The region is also rich in energy resources that meet national and regional demands for energy. As wind, natural gas, and oil energy development expand along with traditional coal, there is an increasing need for research to inform discussions on how to meet immediate and future energy needs while sustaining the health of natural systems. To help address this need, the Appalachian LCC awarded a grant to The Nature Conservancy to assess current and future energy development across the entire region. Assessing Future Energy...
This habitat of upland hardwood-dominated forests occurs in the Interior Low Plateau region of the southeastern United States along ridgetops and slopes of various aspects. The floristic expression of different stands included in this habitat varies considerably with aspect and soil type. Included here are a variety of associations ranging along a moisture gradient from submesic to drier ones. The submesic to dry-mesic expressions tend to be found on midslopes with northerly to easterly aspects, and the drier ones on southerly to westerly aspects and on broad ridges. Parent material can range from calcareous to acidic with very shallow, well- to excessively well-drained soils in the drier expressions and moderately...
Open Woodlands Used generally to describe low density forests, open woodland ecosystems contain widely spaced trees whose crowns do not touch, causing for an open canopy, insignificant midstory canopy layer, sparse understory and where groundcover is the most obvious feature of the landscape dominated by diverseflora (grasses, forbes, sedges). Open Woodlands provide habitat for a diverse mix of wildlife species, several of which are of conservation concern, such as Red Headed Woodpecker, Prairie Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Northern Bobwhite and Eastern Red Bat. Predicted climate change will largely impact changes in temperature and moisture availability in open woodlands systems, likely having a cascading effect...
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Across the Tennessee River Basin is a collaboration within the Appalachian LCC bringing together multiple agencies and stakeholders in a joint effort to plan and deliver landscape conservation actions to protect one of the most diverse areas for aquatic species in North America.The mainstem Tennessee River winds its way for roughly 650 miles through Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, back into Tennessee, and finally into Kentucky, where it empties into the Ohio River. Streams from these states, but also North Carolina and Georgia, feed the river along its course. Indeed, the entire basin encompasses over 40,000 square miles. Five major physiographic provinces are represented within the basin: the Blue Ridge, the Valley...
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The Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team (FHTET) was created by the Deputy Chief for State and Private Forestry in February 1995 to develop and deliver forest health technology services to field personnel in public and private organizations in support of the Forest Service’s land ethic, to “promote the sustainability of ecosystems by ensuring their health, diversity, and productivity.” This dataset shows the total basal area of all tree species as square feet per acre.For more information: http://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/nidrm2012.shtml
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Results of the population growth model developed by the Tennessee Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, 2008, converted to percent projected developed landcover in the year 2040. Spatial growth model was developed using population growth projections from the University of Tennessee Center for Business and Economic Research (UT-CBER), county urban growth boundaries, 2000 census blocks, and various ancillary datasets.
Forested Stream and/or Seepage Forested stream environments are typically found in the buffer zones between forested land and stream banks, often known as riparian zones. Stream headwaters and seepage areas occur where ground water percolates to the surface through muck, mossy rock, and nettles. It can also be found under rocks, among gravel, or cobble where water has begun to percolate in areas near open water. Breeding grounds are commonly found beneath mosses growing on rocks, on logs, or soil surfaces in these types of seepage areas.Predicted climate change will largely impact changes in temperature and moisture availability in forested streamand/or seepage systems, likely having a cascading effect on a species...
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The Appalachian Mountains provide a multitude of habitats that are essential for hundreds of breeding, migrant, and wintering bird species. Its rugged terrain is dominated by forest and woodlands that span 15 states and contain several major eastern rivers that are heavily relied upon by waterfowl. But historical and current land-use changes, environmental disturbances, and other factors are resulting in population declines of more than 1/3 of bird species that breed and winter in the region. Coordinated action among local, state, federal, and other partners is essential to reverse these trends.The Appalachian Mountains Joint Venture (AMJV) is one of 18 habitat Joint Venture partnerships in the United States. It...
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Given the rapid environmental change experienced and expected across the Appalachians, it will be crucial to understand the vulnerabilities of valued ecosystem services to drivers of large-scale change that may threaten their sustainability. The Appalachian LCC has partnered with the US Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center to assess ecosystem services, and vulnerabilities to environmental risk factors, throughout the Appalachians. Synthesizing current knowledge of the diverse benefits that people derive from functioning Appalachian ecosystems will help managers, scientists, industries, and the public to establish a common language for linking the environmental and economic values...
Historically, cave fauna, and any biota for that matter, were largely studied from a taxonomic perspective. With the advent of interest in species diversity in the late 1960’s and especially with the interest in biodiversity and biodiversity hotspots in the late 1980’s, the focus changed. Studies of cave fauna reflected the changing research agendas. In this bibliographic review, we examine five areas of interest: 1) National cave fauna studies; 2) Regional and local cave fauna studies in the Appalachians; 3) A summary of the major taxonomic studies; 4) Previous mapping of biodiversity in the region and the techniques employed; 5) Models for explaining subterranean biodiversity patterns, both in the Appalachians...
This report provides the methods and results of climate change vulnerability assessments of 119 species in New York.


map background search result map search result map WASSI Future Change in Water Supply Stress Index 1991-2010 ForWarn Mean Summer National Difference Vegetation Index 2009-2013 Total Basal Area of All Tree Species 2012 Ecosystem Benefits and Risks Data Needs Assessment Across the Tennessee River Basin NatureScape, Design Focal Areas for Golden Wing Warbler and Cerulean Warbler Essential Forests and Key Connectors in the Central Appalachians Whole System Future Energy Development Tool Public Tennessee Projected Percent Developed in 2040 Provisional Tennessee State Wildlife Action Plan Potential Urban Growth Tennessee Projected Percent Developed in 2040 Provisional Tennessee State Wildlife Action Plan Potential Urban Growth Essential Forests and Key Connectors in the Central Appalachians Whole System Focal Areas for Golden Wing Warbler and Cerulean Warbler WASSI Future Change in Water Supply Stress Index 1991-2010 NatureScape, Design Future Energy Development Tool Public ForWarn Mean Summer National Difference Vegetation Index 2009-2013 Ecosystem Benefits and Risks Data Needs Assessment Across the Tennessee River Basin Total Basal Area of All Tree Species 2012