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The Stilt Sandpiper is an uncommon to common breeding shorebird on the Arctic Coastal Plainof Alaska that typically nests near the coast from the Canadian border to the Barrow area(Johnson et al. 2007, Klima and Jehl 2012). Highest known breeding densities occur in ArcticCanada where they often nest in taiga and boreal habitats
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The Dunlin (arcticola subspecies) is a common breeding bird in Arctic Alaska from the areasurrounding Barrow to the east. The pacifica subspecies also occurs within the Arctic LCCassessment area in the region around Cape Lisburne and Cape Krusenstern. Dunlin use a widevariety of breeding habitats found in the northern sub-arctic and arctic. On the Arctic CoastalPlain of Alaska, C. a. arcticola breed in moist-wet tundra, often in areas with ponds, polygons,and strangmoor landforms (Warnock and Gill 1996). The arcticola subspecies winters in Asiawhile pacifica winters along the west coast of North America. Current population estimate is 1.3million (arcticola: 750,000, pacifica: 500,000; Morrison et al. 2006) with...
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Researchers from the Manomet Center for ConservationSciences combined field observations of shorebirds withmapped physical and ecological parameters to develop a series ofspatially dependent habitat selection models that predict thecontemporary distribution of shorebird species across the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska.
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The Whimbrel is one of the larger breeding shorebirds in Arctic Alaska, occurring in both taigaand tundra habitats. In Arctic Alaska, this species nests in a variety of tundra habitats rangingfrom lowland wet polygonal to well-drained moist upland tundra, sometimes with significantshrub cover
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The Red Knot, roselaari subspecies, is a relatively uncommon breeding shorebird in ArcticAlaska. They typically nest in coastal alpine habitats, preferring sparsely vegetated and broadalpine ridgelines and dome tops (Harrington 2001, J. Johnson, pers. comm.). There is littleinformation on breeding season diet in this species however; field observations suggest a varieddiet from insects to plant materials (e.g., lichens, leaves, berries) (Harrington 2001). During May,knots occur in coastal lagoons adjacent to suitable nesting habitats. These lagoons apparentlyserve as foraging and resting sites preceding dispersal to nesting areas (J. Johnson, pers. comm.).This subspecies winters at sites along the Pacific Coast...
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To better understand and predict effects of climate change on wetlands, invertebrates and shorebirds, the ‘CEWISH’ group,composed of Cryohydrology, Invertebrate, Shorebird Food Use, and Shorebird/Population Modeling teams, collected fielddata at Barrow, Alaska, between May and September 2014–2015. The Cryohydrology team measured end-of-wintersnow accumulation, snowmelt at the landscape scale, pond water levels, and pond water and sediment temperatures. TheInvertebrate team monitored emergence at historic ponds, and documented emergence rates of dominant chironomid taxaunder different experimentally controlled thermal regimes. The Shorebird Food Use team developed a DNA library ofpotential prey items using samples...
The Shorebird Demographic Network is an international collaboration designed to evaluate how climate mediated changes in the arctic ecosystem are affecting shorebird distribution, ecology, and demography. The main purpose of the network is to monitor demographic parameters (e.g. nest success, adult survival) of widely distributed shorebirds, so that we may develop conservation strategies that tackle the most pressing problems facing these declining species. The Arctic LCC contribution adds monitoring components that track key environmental attributes (e.g. water and prey availability) that are expected to link climate with changing shorebird populations.This project attempted to evaluate portions of two conceptual...
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The Pacific Loon is the most common breeding loon in Arctic Alaska, nesting throughout muchof the state (Russell 2002). This species typically breeds on lakes that are ≥1 ha in size in bothboreal and tundra habitats. They are primarily piscivorous although they are known to commonlyfeed chicks invertebrates (D. Rizzolo and J. Schmutz, unpublished data). Many Pacific Loonsspend their winters in offshore waters of the west coast of Canada and the U.S. (Russell 2002).The most recent Alaska population estimate is 100-125,000 individuals (Ruggles and Tankersley1992) with ~ 69,500 on the Arctic Coastal Plain specifically (Groves et al. 1996).
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The Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska is a compilation of spectacled and StellerÓł eider data. This database is intended to be a qualitative “first look” at where spectacled and StellerÓł eiders have been found and where surveys have been conducted. This dataset is intended for general planning and mapping purposes, it should NOT be used for deriving density estimates. The dataset is available either as an ESRI ArcGIS 10 file geodatabase or as a shapefile with associated tables.
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The Yellow-billed loon, the largest of the world’s five loon species, and also the rarest, has oneof the highest nesting densities in the world on the central Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska (Earnstet al. 2005). In Alaska, this species typically breeds on the edges of relatively deep (>2 m), large(usu. >12 ha) fish-bearing lakes (http://alaska.fws.gov/). Little is known about their diet inAlaska, but they are believed to depend on several fish species, with cisco (Coregonus spp.)being the most important (J. Schmutz, pers. comm.). Although previously thought to winter offthe coast of the Pacific Northwest, new evidence suggests the North American breedingpopulation winters in East Asia from the western Kuril Islands...
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This table contains information related to references, such as reports and other publications, that summarize information on threatened eiders and is one component of the Threatened Eider Geodatabase. This database is intended to be a qualitative “first look” at where these two species of eider have been recorded and where surveys have been conducted. This spatial dataset is intended for general planning and mapping purposes rather than for deriving density estimates.The geodatabase is comprised of two feature classes (SPEI_STEI_Observations and Survey_Polys) and two tables (Eider_Incidental_attributes and Eider_Reference_Information).
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The Steller’s Eider, is the smallest of the four eiders and in many ways resembles dabbling ducksmore than sea ducks. This species was listed as “threatened” in 1997 under the EndangeredSpecies Act as it has virtually disappeared from historic breeding areas in the YukonKuskokwimDelta, once the most populated breeding ground in Alaska. In Arctic Alaska,Steller’s Eiders nest in polygonal tundra near the coast or up to 30km inland on sites with acomplex of interconnected ponds (Fredrickson 2001). During the breeding season, their dietconsists primarily of aquatic insects including chironomid and tipulid larvae (Fredrickson 2001).Alaskan breeders spend their winters along the Alaskan panhandle and the eastern AleutianIslands...
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The Bar-tailed Godwit completes one of the most incredible journeys of any bird species,traveling non-stop across the Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Australia and New Zealand during itsfall migration. In Arctic Alaska, this species is found most commonly west of the Colville Riverand is particularly frequent in the Brooks Range foothills (Johnson et al. 2007). On the NorthSlope, Bar-tailed Godwits nest in moist tussock tundra near wetlands to wet sedge meadows(McCaffery and Gill 2001). They typically forage in shallow, flooded areas on insects but willeat berries upon arrival to breeding grounds (McCaffery and Gill 2001). Current populationestimate for North American breeders (baueri subspecies) is 90,000 with a declining...
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Polar bears along Alaska’s Beaufort Sea frequently give birth to young in land-based snow dens.These dens are established in November, typically in deep snowdrifts that have developed in thelee of cut-banks found along streams, rivers, and the coast. Durner et al. (2001, 2006) indicatedthat, for 24 known land den sites, the local slopes ranged from 15 to 50° and were 1.3 to 34 mhigh. The dens faced all directions but east. They published a distribution map based on habitatcharacteristics, presumably reflecting snow drifting, largely bracketing the generally northwardflowing drainages of the region. No attempt was made in the cited studies to model snow driftingexplicitly, though it was recognized that this was an...
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We assessed change in the seasonal timing of insect emergence from tundra ponds near Barrow, Alaskaover a four-decade timespan, and explored factors that regulate this significant ecological phenomenon.The early-summer pulse of adult insects emerging from myriad tundra ponds on the Arctic Coastal Plainis an annual event historically coincident with resource demand by tundra-nesting avian consumers.Asymmetrical changes in the seasonal timing of prey availability and consumer needs may impact arcticbreedingshorebirds, eiders, and passerines. We have found evidence of change in the thermal behaviorof these arctic wetlands, along with a shift in the phenology of emerging pond insects. Relative to the1970s, tundra ponds...
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The Black-bellied Plover breeds regularly in Arctic Alaska with the highest numbersconcentrated in the central portion of the Arctic Coastal Plain (Johnson et al. 2007). Ingeneral, this species tends to choose dry habitats for nesting such as dry heath tundra, exposedridges, and river banks. They will occasionally nest in wetter tundra habitats but tend to selectdrier microsites (Paulson 1995). Black-bellied Plovers search for invertebrate prey visually onopen tundra during the breeding season. This species winters along the coastlines of NorthAmerica from southern Canada to Middle America (Paulson 1995). Current Alaskapopulation estimate (P. s. squatarola) is 50,000 with a declining population trend (Morrisonet...
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The Long-tailed Jaeger, the most sleek and graceful of the three jaegers, is a common bird inArctic Alaska. Similar to the larger Pomarine Jaeger, this species diet consists primarily oflemmings and voles, however, unlike the Pomarine Jaeger, Long-tailed Jaegers can withstandcyclical rodent crashes as they can readily switch to other food sources (Wiley and Lee 1998).The Long-tailed Jaegers breeding range in Alaska extends more deeply into the interior thaneither the Pomarine or Parasitic Jaeger and typically nests in drier upland tundra (Wiley and Lee1998). The current global population estimate is >150,000 – 5,000,000 (BirdLife International2012). There is no Alaska population estimate available.
Water availability, distribution, quality and quantity are critical habitat elements for fish and other water-dependent species. Furthermore, the availability of water is also a pre-requisite for a number of human activities. The density of weather and hydrology observation sites on the North Slope is orders of magnitude less than in other parts of the U.S., making it difficult to document hydrologic trends and develop accurate predictive models where water is a key input. The information that does exist is scattered among many entities, and varies in format. This multi-year data rescue effort project brought together scarce and scattered hydrology data sets, including high-priority datasets held by the Bureau of...
BioMap Alaska is a citizen science observation and information management tool. BioMap Alaska engages residents of coastal communities to voluntarily report observations and local knowledge of marine life. This project is intended to improve and expand upon science based monitoring activities, and to further cooperation and collaboration among local people, researchers, and resource managers. We provide a field guide of “species of interest” on which we are seeking information and web-based data logging so that that observers can enter their observations and view these on an online map. Anyone who is interested can view the BioMap data.WHY DO WE NEED BIOMAP ALASKA?There are ongoing and significant ocean environment...
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The Savannah Sparrow has a widespread breeding range across North America from thesouthern U.S. to Arctic Alaska. This species will breed in open habitats ranging from meadows,cultivated fields, grazed pastures, roadsides, coastal grasslands and tundra (Wheelwright andRising 2008). On the coastal plain of Arctic Alaska, tundra nesting habitat is often associatedwith stream/river drainages, nesting on the ground often hidden under low shrubs (Wheelwrightand Rising 2008). During the breeding season they forage in a wide range of habitats on a varietyof insect prey although seeds and other vegetative matter are also consumed (Wheelwright andRising 2008). Savannah Sparrows are short-distance migrants and winter in the...


map background search result map search result map Hydroclimatological Data Rescue, Data Inventory, Network Analysis, and Data Distribution ASDN: a Network of Sites to Evaluate How Climate-mediated Change in the Arctic Ecosystem are Affecting Shorebird Distribution, Ecology, and Demography Final Report Narrative to National Fish and Wildlife Fund:  Climate, Wetlands and Waterbirds Interdisciplinary Project BioMap Alaska - Citizen Science for Alaska's Oceans Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Whimbrel Seasonality of Invertebrates Final Report Stilt Sandpiper Bar-tailed Godwit Dunlin Black-bellied Plover Savannah Sparrow Mapping Suitable Snow Habitat for Polar Bear Denning Final Report Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska, 2012 Edition Threatened Eider GDB, 2012 Edition shapefiles and tables Red Knot Yellow-billed Loon Pacific Loon Steller's Eider Long-tailed Jaeger Mapping Suitable Snow Habitat for Polar Bear Denning Final Report Seasonality of Invertebrates Final Report Final Report Narrative to National Fish and Wildlife Fund:  Climate, Wetlands and Waterbirds Interdisciplinary Project Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Whimbrel Stilt Sandpiper Bar-tailed Godwit Dunlin Black-bellied Plover Savannah Sparrow Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska, 2012 Edition Threatened Eider GDB, 2012 Edition shapefiles and tables Red Knot Yellow-billed Loon Pacific Loon Steller's Eider Long-tailed Jaeger BioMap Alaska - Citizen Science for Alaska's Oceans Hydroclimatological Data Rescue, Data Inventory, Network Analysis, and Data Distribution ASDN: a Network of Sites to Evaluate How Climate-mediated Change in the Arctic Ecosystem are Affecting Shorebird Distribution, Ecology, and Demography