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The Northern Pintail is the most common breeding dabbling duck in Arctic Alaska, with its corebreeding area centered on the coastal plain. In Alaska this species nests on wet sedge (Carex) orgrass meadows, sloughs, river banks, pond shores and in tidal habitats (Austin and Miller 1995).During the breeding season pintails consume mostly animal foods (aquatic invertebrates)although they switch to a largely vegetarian diet later in summer and fall (Austin and Miller1995). Northern Pintails spend their winters primarily in the southern US and Mexico (Austinand Miller 1995). The North American pintail population is down from 6 million in the early1970s to 2.6 million in 2005 (http://ak.audubon.org/species/norpin). However,...
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The Baird’s Sandpiper is an uncommon breeding bird in Arctic Alaska using both coastal andmontane regions. This species typically nests in upland, well-drained, exposed tundra, generallyavoiding wet tundra although will sometimes nest in wet prairie meadows near lakes (Marconi &Salvadori 2008). Like other sandpipers, Baird’s Sandpipers feed almost entirely on insects duringthe breeding season adjusting to seasonal shifts in primary prey items (Moskoff andMontgomerie 2002). This species is a long-distance migrant and winters throughout the southerncone of South America. Current population estimate is 300,000 (Morrison et al. 2006).
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Cackling and Canada Geese were recently split into two species. The Cackling Goose tavernerisubspecies is thought to be the dominant breeder on Alaska’s Arctic Coastal Plain although someevidence suggests they may interbreed with Canada Goose parvipes subspecies (Mowbray et al.2002). Coastal plain Cackling/Canada geese nest in moist sedge shrub tundra with brood rearingin wet sedge meadows, often near the coast (Mowbray et al. 2002). On the coastal plain their dietis dominated by Carex spp. (J. Hupp, pers. comm.). Arctic Alaskan populations winter primarilyin w. Washington and Oregon as well as n. California (Mowbray et al. 2002). The AlaskanArctic Coastal Plain population is estimated at ~8,000 with a stable population...
The Arctic LCC created the Threatened Eider Geodatabase to serve as a repository for threatened eider distribution information. This database is intended to be a qualitative “first look” at where these two species of eider have been recorded and where surveys have been conducted. This dataset is intended for general planning and mapping purposes, it should NOT be used for deriving density estimates. Users are reminded that these data do not represent all locations within the geographic scope of this database that may be occupied by threatened eiders..
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The Willow Ptarmigan is an abundant and conspicuous breeding bird in Arctic Alaska and is oneof the few birds that remain in the Arctic year-round. During the breeding season this speciesnests in tall shrub habitats as well as in well-drained tundra sites (Hannon et al. 1998). In earlyspring Willow Ptarmigan are willow bud specialists (constituting up to 80% of their diet); insummer the dietary breadth widens substantially to include insects, berries, equisetum, andleaves (Hannon et al. 1998). In Alaska, female Willow Ptarmigan may move as far south as thesouthern side of the Brooks Range in winter while males stay closer to the tundra breedinggrounds (Irving et al. 1966). Global population estimate is 40 million...
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Shorebirds are among the most abundant and visible high-latitude vertebrates. Their ecology makes them particularly sensitive to climate change in the arctic. The current distribution of shorebirds on the Arctic Coastal Plain is poorly known because accurate data exist from just a few locations. The Arctic LCC has supported development of habitat selection models that combine bird survey data with remotely-sensed habitat maps to “fill in the gaps” where observations are sparse. In future phases, the distribution maps generated from these models could be ground-truthed and improved, and subsequently used as the basis from which to forecast future shorebird distribution for projected future climate scenarios.
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The Tundra Swan is the more widespread and northerly ranging of the two native swan speciesin North America. In Arctic Alaska, they nest in wet to dry tundra habitat types preferring islandsin lakes or ponds, or naturally occurring frost heaves at the intersection of polygon pond rims.Nesting territories almost always include a large lake that the family will use as a safe havenfrom terrestrial predators (Limpert and Earnst 1994). During the breeding season, their diet isprimarily vegetarian, eating emergent and submerged vegetation in lakes and ponds. They alsograze on terrestrial vegetation near the water (Limpert and Earnst 1994). Most North Slopebreeders winter on the east coast Mid-Atlantic States (Limpert...
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In Arctic ecosystems, freshwater fish migrateseasonally between productive shallow water habitatsthat freeze in winter and deep overwinter refuge in riversand lakes. How these movements relate to seasonal hydrologyis not well understood.We used passive integratedtransponder tags and stream wide antennae to track1035 Arctic grayling in Crea Creek, a seasonally flowingbeaded stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska. Migrationof juvenile and adult fish into Crea Creek peakedin June immediately after ice break-up in the stream. Fishthat entered the stream during periods of high flow andcold stream temperature traveled farther upstream thanthose entering during periods of lower flow and warmertemperature. We used generalized...
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The Lapland Longspur is the most abundant passerine breeder on the North Slope of Alaska.This species is most commonly associated with the Arctic Coastal Plain, but also nests in alpinehabitats in the interior Brooks Range. High nesting densities have been found throughout theAlaskan coastal plain (Custer and Pitelka 1977, Liebezeit et al. 2011) with nesting sites often indry/moist tundra near tussocks and less frequently in wetter tundra habitats (Hussell andMontgomerie 2002). During the breeding season they typically forage in a wide range of habitatson a variety of invertebrates but also consume seeds and other vegetative matter (Hussell andMontgomerie 2002). Alaskan Lapland Longspurs are short-distance migrants...
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The Hoary Redpoll, closely related and often difficult to distinguish from the Common Redpoll,is a common finch of the circumpolar arctic. In Alaska their range is largely sympatric with theCommon Redpoll although they tend to be more common further north. Like the CommonRedpoll, they utilize both forested and tundra habitats although they tend to utilize tundrahabitats more extensively (Knox and Lowther 2000). In Arctic Alaska tundra, this species nestsin willows (primarily along riparian areas) or on the ground in shrubby areas (Knox and Lowther2000, J. Liebezeit, unpublished data). While primarily a seed eater, in summer this speciesconsumes arthropods to feed young (Knox and Lowther 2000). Hoary Redpolls often...
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This dataset contains rasters that represent mapped habitat suitability indices for 8 shorebird species, a raster that represents mean habitat suitability indices for all 8 species, and a raster that represents the number of species in which the habitat suitability index exceeded the selected threshold value for each pixel. The shorebird species used for this modeling effort are American Golden-Plover [AMGP], Black-bellied Plover [BBPL], Dunlin [DUNL], Long-billed Dowitcher [LBDO], Pectoral Sandpiper [PESA], Red Phalarope [REPH], Red-necked Phalarope [RNPH], and Semipalmated Sandpiper [SESA].
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A gull of the Subarctic and Arctic, the Sabine’s Gull, with its distinctive plumage, commonlynests in the Alaskan Arctic, often in association with Arctic Terns (Sterna paradisaea). Thisspecies typically nests near fresh water in swampy low-lying tundra, in tidal marshes, and onsmall coastal islands (Day et al. 2001). During the breeding season, aquatic insects and otherinvertebrates are their most important food items (Day et al. 2001). Sabine’s Gulls spend theirwinters offshore primarily in subtropical and tropical coastal upwelling zones (Day et al. 2001).The northern Alaska population estimate is rarely surveyed extensively. Two surveys in 1996indicate a population somewhere between 6,000 and 10,000 (Day et...
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Summary report titled “Development of Shorebird Distribution Maps for the North Slope of Alaska Using Geospatial Habitat Modeling: the First Step in Assessing Effects of Climate Change.” The report includes an Appendix that identifies data layers that were unavailable but would have been useful to include in the study.
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The Snow Goose is a common breeder in Arctic Alaska, typically nesting in small, densecolonies scattered near the coast. This species nests on flat tundra, near ponds, shallow lakes,streams, and islands in river deltas (Mowbray et al. 2000). During the breeding season, their dietis primarily vegetarian, eating both aquatic and drier tundra vegetation (Mowbray et al. 2000).For brood rearing, one of the more important habitats is salt affected tundra on islands in riverdeltas (J. Shook, pers. comm.). Most North Slope breeders winter in western North Americafrom British Columbia into California (Mowbray et al. 2000). Current Arctic Coastal Plainpopulation is estimated at approximately 9,000 with an increasing trend...
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Historically, available den habitat models have been based primarily on the presence of topographic features capable of capturing drifting snow. In any given season, however, the availability and precise location of snowdrifts of sufficient size to accommodate a bear den depends on the antecedent snowfall and wind conditions, and these vary from one year to the next. Thus, suitable topography is a necessary pre-condition, but is not sufficient to accurately predict potential den sites in a given year.To satisfy the requirements of agency and industry managers what is needed is a user-friendly decision-support tool that takes into account the current fall and early-winter meteorological conditions, and provides den...
The primary goal of this project was to predict climate-related changes in the timing and duration of insect prey availability for arctic-breeding shorebirds. Researchers coordinated closely with the Arctic Shorebird Demographics Network, whose collaborators sampled aquatic insect emergence, terrestrial insect activity, and associated environmental data at sites across arctic Alaska and Canada. Using ASDN data, they developed mathematical models that relate the timing and duration of insect emergence and activity to accumulated temperature, weather, and other environmental variables. They used these models to predict future changes in the timing of arctic insect availability based on climate change projections....
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The Integrated Ecosystem Model for Alaska project (IEM) uses down-scaled climate models as the drivers of ecosystem change to produce forecasts of future fire, vegetation, permafrost and hydrology regimes at a resolution of 1km. This effort is the first to model ecosystem change on a statewide scale, using climate change input as a major driving variable. The objectives of the IEM project are as follows; to better understand and predict effects of climate change and other stressors on landscape level physical and ecosystem processes, and to provide support for resource conservation planning.The IEM will provide resource managers with a decision support tool to visualize future landscapes in Alaska. Model outputs...
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The Red Knot, roselaari subspecies, is a relatively uncommon breeding shorebird in ArcticAlaska. They typically nest in coastal alpine habitats, preferring sparsely vegetated and broadalpine ridgelines and dome tops (Harrington 2001, J. Johnson, pers. comm.). There is littleinformation on breeding season diet in this species however; field observations suggest a varieddiet from insects to plant materials (e.g., lichens, leaves, berries) (Harrington 2001). During May,knots occur in coastal lagoons adjacent to suitable nesting habitats. These lagoons apparentlyserve as foraging and resting sites preceding dispersal to nesting areas (J. Johnson, pers. comm.).This subspecies winters at sites along the Pacific Coast...
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Researchers from the Manomet Center for ConservationSciences combined field observations of shorebirds withmapped physical and ecological parameters to develop a series ofspatially dependent habitat selection models that predict thecontemporary distribution of shorebird species across the ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska.
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The Whimbrel is one of the larger breeding shorebirds in Arctic Alaska, occurring in both taigaand tundra habitats. In Arctic Alaska, this species nests in a variety of tundra habitats rangingfrom lowland wet polygonal to well-drained moist upland tundra, sometimes with significantshrub cover


map background search result map search result map Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska SnowDens-3D User Documentation Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Shorebird Habitat Suitability Summary Report Shorebird Habitat Suitability Indices Geodatabase Whimbrel Baird's Sandpiper Willow Ptarmigan Lapland Longspur Red Knot Seasonal cues of Arctic grayling movement in a small Arctic stream: the importance of surface water connectivity Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada (COPY) Sabine's Gull Canada/Cackling Goose Tundra Swan Snow Goose Northern Pintail Hoary Redpoll Modeling Shorebird Distribution on the North Slope Climate effects on Arctic Food Resources: Modeling the Timing and Duration of Aquatic Insect Emergence from Tundra Ponds Seasonal cues of Arctic grayling movement in a small Arctic stream: the importance of surface water connectivity SnowDens-3D User Documentation Threatened Eider Geodatabase for Northern Alaska Shorebird Distribution Models Factsheet Shorebird Habitat Suitability Summary Report Shorebird Habitat Suitability Indices Geodatabase Whimbrel Baird's Sandpiper Willow Ptarmigan Lapland Longspur Red Knot Sabine's Gull Canada/Cackling Goose Tundra Swan Snow Goose Northern Pintail Hoary Redpoll Modeling Shorebird Distribution on the North Slope Integrated Ecosystem Model (AIEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada (COPY) Climate effects on Arctic Food Resources: Modeling the Timing and Duration of Aquatic Insect Emergence from Tundra Ponds