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We will identify regional and area office partners within Reclamation to use available downscaled climate projections, translate projections into biological forecasts for projected changes to populations and habitat, conduct probabilistic scenario planning, and recommend management actions. The research will also identify strategic basins to work in, find personnel to conduct the work, and locate external funding and in-kind services (e.g., non-governmental organizations, State agencies, and other Federal agencies). We will identify fisheries population and fish physiology effects as well as invasive species effects from climate change in Reclamation-managed systems. We will concentrate on effects on species of...
This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarix (salt cedar). Biological control agents (beetles) will be introduced into the tamarix stands. Chemical controls will also be used to ensure stand removal. This project controls invasive species in riparian areas to reduce economic and ecological impacts. These impacts are especially acute in riparian ecosystems. This collaborative effort with Sweetwater County leverages available resources. 2008 Update: Four hundred (400) acres of weed treatments were applied, including the tamarisk and perennial pepperweed treatment along Little Bitter Creek and Red Creek. 2009 Update: The beetles for the biological control of the tamarix in the Bitter Creek...
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This project represents a continuation and expansion from the KFO’s 2004 CCI Project #21055 - Bear River Cooperative Weed Management. This project is for spraying and biological control of all Invasive/Noxious Weeds within the Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) area within Lincoln and Uinta Counties. Funding costs includes hiring seasonal staff and a vehicle to continue inventorying and mapping of weeds within the area. In 2009, 1,000 acres of weeds will be treated on BLM lands and 1,000 treated acres will be evaluated. Efforts will first be directed to areas where the resource benefits are most important as identified by the WLCI and the KFO. Maintaining the native vegetative communities and protecting them from invading...
This project is intended to provide a source of native seed and plant material for BLM’s Wyoming field office programs and projects. The intent of this proposal is to develop and maintain a supply of native plant seed, vegetative propagules, and native seed reserves for use on BLM projects primarily within the Green River Basin, SW Wyoming. This project would assist in providing native plant material and seed for watershed restoration projects on federal lands. The project is in compliance with National BLM native plant policies and goals. Currently, Wyoming BLM does not have native species under cultivation. The native plant program will provide seed and seedlings for field office’s programs, principally wildfire...
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This project improves the age class and diversity of plant communities. Improving transitional range will help hold the antelope and deer in this area, saving crucial winter areas for use later in the season. Other wildlife benefitting from this treatment are small mammals and a variety of birds, including sage grouse. Quality, quantity, and availability of forage in this transitional-migratory area will be improved. The units of accomplishments for this project, 10,000 acres (JM), are shared with multiple funding sources; due to the timing of the project; some units will carry over into FY 08. Some of the included acres are within the Wildland Urban Interface (JW).
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The proposed action is to conduct several different forms of forest and rangeland health treatments to improve and restore good health conditions in aspen woodlands and rangelenads on roughly between 700,000-750,000 acres of public lands. The goal is to implement a combination of treatments (mechanical removal of conifer encroachment in aspen stands, prescribed burning, hazardous fuels reduction and mechanical brush beating) within identified areas of forest and rangelands to improve aspen stands, rangeland vegetation, and riparian ecosystem health; improve livestock grazing and wildlife habitat conditions; and reduce hazardous fire fuel build up within juniper woodlands. This is an effort to improve the overall...
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Russian olive and tamarisk are two invasive species that have established along the Green River. These two species are poor riparian plants and are outcompeting the native vegetation. Native vegetation is well suited to stabilize stream banks and capture sediment, thereby improving water quality. Currently the Wyoming Game and Fish Department has funded the Teton Science School to conduct an assessment from Fontenelle Dam to the southern end of Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), and the City of Green River is treating Russian olive and Tamarisk on their properties. There is a need to complete an assessment from the southern boundary of Seedskadee NWR to Flaming Gorge Reservoir, initiate control measures...
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Project Synopsis: the goal of this study is to define the potential accumulation of hydrocarbons in surface waters and aquatic habitats of the New Fork River and to establish a baseline of potential toxicological effects on aquatic life.
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FY2014There is increasing interest in climate change adaptation, particularly since the release of the Presidents Executive Order on Climate Preparedness in November, 2013, yet many field staff remain uncertain how to put adaptation into practice. Our goal with this project is to bridge the gap between the wealth of high-level climate adaptation guidance and the field staff who carry out specific regulatory processes, specifically Habitat Conservation Plans. Following best practices from the literature on linking science and management, we will begin with a focus on what people do rather than on the climate science. We will map the current HCP development and approval process in Region 8, identify where and how...
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Prescribed burns to restore aspen habitat on one of the most important elk calving areas for Afton herd and important for aspen-dependent species, transition and winter range for elk, mule deer, and moose east of Alpine, transition and winter range for mule deer and elk of crucial winter range just east of Smoot, and sagebrush, aspen, meadow, and willow habitat on transition range for mule deer and elk 30 miles up the Greys River. In addition, determine 1) locations and distribution of aspen stands on the district that are in need of treatment and 2) prioritize stands relative to level of risk, this information to be used in formulating an aspen treatment schedule. (This assessment would be consistent with methodology...
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The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacks Fork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide....
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Carney Ranch Company (formerly Carney Land Company and Carney Ranch) have expressed clear interest in protecting their properties and holdings in the Upper Green River Valley from development through the sale of conservation easements on 3,765 acres. An additional 1,200 acres of land owned by Carney Land Company are already under conservation easements held by the Green River Valley Land Trust. The overall, primary objective is to protect and preserve the outstanding wildlife and open space values that currently exist in this portion of the Upper Green River Valley in perpetuity.
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The Shirley Basin watershed area provides habitat for a variety of wildlife species including identified core areas for greater sage grouse, as well as historic sage grouse ranges outside of core areas. Project objectives center around bringing upland and riparian vegatation, wildlife habitat, and watershed health towards a condition that will better benefit, Sage Grouse. Improving areas of nesting habitat as well as brood rearing habitat for grouse will be the major focus is the Shirley Basin area. The Shirley Basin watershed area provides habitat for a variety of wildlife species including greater sage-grouse Core Area. Current landowners, Permitees, Conservation Dist., WGFD, and BLM have identified this...
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Encampment restoration/enhancement effort: This project is just one part of a large effort to improve aquatic and riparian habitat along the Encampment River. Issues at hand include improving irrigation efficiency, eliminating cobble push-up dams that cause river instability during their maintenance and also eliminate them as fish migration barriers. Riparian emphasis focuses on managing grazing near riparian areas as well as reestablishment of the cottonwood gallery. Strategy: The Riverside Stream Enhancement project will use "Natural Channel Design" approach to assess and restore stream channels by moving them toward their potential stable form. Geomorphology, hydrology, drainage, erosion, irrigation...
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The Forest Service proposes two prescribed burns at Weiner Creek (1,500 acres) and Lower Cottonwood Creek (400 acres) to restore aspen habitat in one of the most important elk calving areas for the Afton herd and important for aspen-dependent species, transition and winter range for elk, mule deer, and moose east of Alpine, transition and winter range for mule deer and elk of crucial winter range just east of Smoot, and sagebrush, aspen, meadow, and willow habitat on transition range for mule deer and elk 30 miles up the Greys River.
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The project will modify approximately 24 total miles of existing woven-wire, 6-strand and 5-strand barbed wire fence to 3 or 4-wire fence built with wildlife specifications to facilitate big game movement on the Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area (WHMA). The new fences will be built to standard Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) wildlife specifications for wire spacing including a smooth bottom wire positioned 16-18 inches above the ground, and a ratio of three steel posts per one wood post. The fence modification work is planned in phases, where the contractor would remove and reconstruct 4 miles of fence annually on the WHMA during a 6-year period to accomplish the entire 24-mile improvement project....
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Project Synopsis: improved grazing management over the past decade in the lower Coal Creek drainage has resulted in gradual positive trends in riparian habitat conditions. This project will address degraded habitat conditions not directly related to grazing management and build additional trust and cooperation. The Thomas Fork Habitat Management Plan developed cooperatively by WGFD and BLM in 1979 “to preserve, manage, and enhance BCT habitat” identified sediment contribution from the Coal Creek road as an important issue. In 2010, WGFD hired a consultant to develop conceptual plans to address the large amounts of sediment contributed into the stream at eleven (11) key sites along a two (2) mile stretch of Coal...
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This is a multi-year project to repair a diversion structure which is preventing a head-cut from continuing upstream. Objectives: 1) Reduce or halt erosion occurring at the headcut. 2) Halt the headcut progression which may infringe on and destabilize upstream railroad, highway, interstate, and mine PMT. 3) Halt the headcut progression into the upstream channel morphology and riparian regime. Strategies: • Detailed runoff and flow analysis to the headcut location for the associated 830 square mile drainage area. • Selection of the acceptable design event/peak design flow for the structure. • Determination of all permitting requirements, timeframes, and responsibilities. • Evaluation of the native material stability...
This project would increase the diversity and abundance of forbs and invertebrates in riparian and transitional riparian/upland areas. Treatments would include physical manipulation through mowing, imprinting, or just interseeding to create an enhanced vegetative mosiac within riparian or transitional riparian areas lacking in vegetative species and structural diversity. Since there are a number of invasives/exotic plants in the area, the area will be treated before seeding to ensure the natives species have an advantage. Mechanical manipulation for seed bed preparation, seeding of native seeds and control of invasives/exotic plants will be handled through contracts. This project focuses on improving habitat for...
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Wildfires are one of the greatest threats to human infrastructure and the ecosystem services humans value in the western US, but are also necessary in fire-adapted ecosystems. Wildfire activity is widely projected to increase in response to climate change in the Northwest, but we currently lack a comprehensive understanding of what this increase will look like or what its impacts will be on a variety of ecological and hydrologic systems. This project addressed one critical part of those impacts: the islands of unburned vegetation within wildfires. Unburned islands occur naturally as wildfires burn across landscapes, and are important habitat refuges for species -- places where plants and animals survive the fire...


map background search result map search result map Shirley Basin Area Sage Grouse Habitat Management Green River Russian Olive - Tamarisk Riverside Stream Enhancement Phase II Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives Native Seed Development in Wyoming Red Canyon/Elk Mountain Prescribed Burn LSCD - Little Snake Aspen Work Weiner Creek and Lower Cottonwood Creek Prescription Burns Treat Sagebrush Habitat Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area Fence Modification Grey's River Prescription Burn - Bradley Mountain Bitter Creek Tamarix Removal Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal Carney Ranch Easement Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction Bitter Creek Restoration 2013 New Fork River Infiltration of Trace Organics Disappearing Refugia: Identifying Trends and Resilience in Unburned Islands under Climate Change Adding Climate Smart Principles into Habitat Conservation Planning Green River Russian Olive - Tamarisk Riverside Stream Enhancement Phase II Grey's River Prescription Burn - Bradley Mountain Red Canyon/Elk Mountain Prescribed Burn Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area Fence Modification LSCD - Little Snake Aspen Work Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal New Fork River Infiltration of Trace Organics Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction Shirley Basin Area Sage Grouse Habitat Management Bitter Creek Restoration 2013 Disappearing Refugia: Identifying Trends and Resilience in Unburned Islands under Climate Change Adding Climate Smart Principles into Habitat Conservation Planning