Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > LC MAP - Landscape Conservation Management and Analysis Portal > Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative > GNLCC Supported Science Projects > Strategic conservation planning for management applications in Cascadia ( Show direct descendants )

37 results (21ms)   

Location

Folder
ROOT
_ScienceBase Catalog
__LC MAP - Landscape Conservation Management and Analysis Portal
___Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative
____GNLCC Supported Science Projects
_____Strategic conservation planning for management applications in Cascadia
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
This project supports completion of operational scale connectivity analyses within identified priority linkage areas in the British Columbia–Washington transboundary subregion (from the Cascades crest eastward through the Kettle River Range within the Columbia Mountains). Our efforts are building upon previous investments by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative and independent analyses that identified the major fracture zones within this landscape and the most important linkage areas to maintain or restore connectivity including those expected to be resilient to climate change.
The Cascadia Partner Forum requests funding to complete conservation design for four Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative conservation targets with significance to the transboundary Cascadia landscape to inform sound, data-driven management planning and action. This project aims to complete conservation design at the Cascadia-wide scale for grizzly bear, salmon, aquatic, and terrestrial connectivity to contribute to the Great Northern LCC Science Plan, while providing input and integration to the courser scale GNLCC-wide Science Plan’s established objectives, threats, metrics, and conservation actions for each target. Additionally we propose to conduct analyses on a common Great Northern LCC landscape...
The Canadian Crown of the Continent (CCoC) is one of three zones where wolverines can move between Canada and the US, providing the last links for recruitment and ultimately gene flow to the highly fragmented population in the US Rocky Mountains. But a combination of rapidly expanding logging, energy development and motorized recreation, along with a growing road network, threatens to fragment and diminish connections in this critical transboundary linkage between the US and Canada. The province of Alberta recently created two parks in the CCoC expanding protection in the Castle Wilderness north of Waterton Lakes National Park and along the British Columbia (BC)- Alberta border. The western boundary of the Castle...
TASK: Identify both: (1) the special priority linkages from the statewide analysis, Columbia Plateau (as they are within Cascadia), and Bill Gaines’s forest level work within Cascadia. What patterns stood out for key linkages and fracture zones; and (2) the key landscape scale linkages to Cascadia from the statewide and Columbia Plateau that keep Cascadia connected to a regional network.
Grizzly bears once had the widest distribution of any bears in the world, including throughout Cascadia (Almack et al. 1993; USFWS 1993, 1997). But due to large scale habitat loss and related human conflict and decades of persecution, grizzly numbers and their range have been reduced by 98% in the continental US (USFWS 1993). This iconic species is culturally and ecologically significant, particularly to indigenous communities in the Cascades and throughout western US and Canada (Rockwell 1991). Grizzly bears feed on a wide variety of plants and animals, and rely on large intact interconnected habitats. Because of their large home ranges and wide variety of habitat needs, grizzly bears are considered an excellent...
WildLinks is a conference comprised of a unique collection of stakeholders. Members of this gathering have come together out of the need for a communal approach to addressing priority ecological and environmental issues in the Pacific Northwest. WildLinks was initiated by Conservation Northwest, originating in an organic manner. The catalyst of this meeting is a need for discussions about the interconnectedness of our landscape and of individual research and conservation efforts within it. These discussions allow for knowledgeable individuals from a range of backgrounds to collaborate across borders and disciplines on priority issues at a scale that matches the problems at hand.
The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) was listed as a threatened species in the United States in 1975. Grizzly bear recovery across the range has since been guided by the Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan (USFWS 1993) and within Washington State by the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Recovery Area plan (USFWS 1997). The North Cascades Ecosystem extends north into British Columbia and includes the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Population Unit (Apps 2010, BCME 2010). The entire North Cascades ecosystem is within the boundaries of the Cascadia Partner Forum landscape. The Cascadia Partner forum was formed to foster communication among a network of natural resource practitioners working with the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives in...
Information on the impact of roads and trails on the landscape within the Teanaway Community Forest (TCF) has been identified as a high priority baseline-data need in order to manage the TCF to meet many of its goals. Two primary metrics that the TCF Advisory Committee and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) & Department of Natural Resources (DNR) want to measure to quantify the impacts of roads and trails are fine sediment and wetland function. We are using the Washington Road Surface Erosion Model (WARSEM) to quantify potential fine sediment mobilization into water bodies of the TCF. To accomplish this requires intensive field-data collection on all roads and trails from which sediment could be transported...
This report synthesizes information relative to conservation, management and research (ongoing and proposed) of lynx, lynx habitat and prey species, to be integrated into the Cascadia Partner Forum’s Science Plan contribution to the Great Northern LCC and to inform updates to the Working for Wildlife business plan. Canada lynx is a focal species of the Working for Wildlife Initiative and a Target species of the GNLCC science plan. A specific conservation goal within the GNLCC science plan is for “large intact blocks” of habitat within the Cascadia Ecotype.
thumbnail
If the youth leaders of tomorrow’s conservation movement could tell natural resource practitioners, wildlife and wildlands agencies, and non-profit organizations one thing, what would it be? To kick off the 2015 annual meeting of the Cascadia Partner Forum known we decided to find out as part of our Voices of Cascadia project. Working with students from the Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at University of Washington as well as attendees of the North Cascades Institute’s Environmental Learning Center, we interviewed over a dozen young people about what they thought was important for a wild and healthy future in our region. This video is a sampling of what they had to say. Led by the Cascadia Partner Forum,...


map background search result map search result map Documents WA Bear Population Units Video: Voices of Cascadia: The Next Generation Okanagan Valley south to Yakama Basin Connected Backbone Polygon Mule Deer Big Horn Sheep N/S Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 3.) Grizzly Crossing with HWY 6 (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 5.) Mtn Caribou/ Grizzly/ Big Horn Sheep (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 6.) Tommy Creek Grizzly Bear and Mule Deer Habitat (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 7.) Grizzly Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 8.) Garrison Lakes (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 9.) Historic Lynx Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 10.) Video: Voices of Cascadia: The Next Generation Okanagan Valley south to Yakama Basin Connected Backbone Polygon Mule Deer Big Horn Sheep N/S Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 3.) Grizzly Crossing with HWY 6 (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 5.) Mtn Caribou/ Grizzly/ Big Horn Sheep (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 6.) Tommy Creek Grizzly Bear and Mule Deer Habitat (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 7.) Grizzly Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 8.) Garrison Lakes (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 9.) Historic Lynx Movement (Wild Links Spatial Priorities 2015 10.) WA Bear Population Units