Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Contacts: G.A. Mueller (X)

11 results (272ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Bonytail and razorback sucker have once again spawned and produced swim-up larvae in Cibola High Levee Pond (CHLP). CHLP continues to support annual recruitment of bonytail while recent razorback sucker recruitment remains elusive. Thus far, razorbacks have experienced intermittent years of spawning success. Both native species were observed spawning on, or near, the riprap on the river levee. Razorbacks spawned from late January until mid-March over gravel and large cobble along the levee toe (2-3 m depth) and bonytail spawned along the levee shoreline during mid-April. Razorback suckers rapidly fin during the reproductive act, which flushes fines from the substrate and leaves gravel relatively clean. Bonytail...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
thumbnail
We collected an adult gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) from the San Juan River just upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, on 6 June 2000. This represents the first documented occurrence of the species in the Colorado River or its tributaries. The adult male (35 cm TL, 470 g) was taken by trammel net from a small (0.5 ha), shallow (<2 m) backwater along with several other fish that included 3 endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus). The specimen is stored at the Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (curation number 49122).
thumbnail
A single stocking of 611 wild flannelmouth suckers Catostomus latipinnis in 1976 represented the first successful reintroduction of a native fish in the lower Colorado River. Flannelmouth suckers ranging in age from young of the year to 24 years were captured during 1999–2001; their population was estimated as at least 2,286 (95% confidence interval, 1,847–2,998). Recruitment appeared sporadic, consisting of consecutive years of low recruitment (<10%) supplemented by a stronger (31%) year-class. Historically, this native fish was rare and was believed extirpated from the lower river by 1975, but it now reproduces naturally in a reach dramatically altered by water development. This successful reintroduction indicates...
thumbnail
Distribution, movements, and habitat use of 10 wild adult razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) were examined in Lake Mohave, Arizona-Nevada, from November 1994 through July 1997. Movement rates (0.00-17.35 km d⁻¹) and ranges (x̄ = 39 km) were similar to those for riverine populations. All study fish returned to spawning sites used in previous years, but they also visited other spawning areas. Spawning females were significantly (P = 0.031) more active than males (480 vs. 87 m d⁻¹) and moved substantial distances between spawning sites during peak reproduction (1-28 February). Fish became most active (m d⁻¹, km month⁻¹) after spawning and moved to areas known to support higher algal production. Fish were typically...
thumbnail
Bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) and red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) are widespread introduced taxa that are problematic throughout the western United States. Their impact on native amphibians and crustaceans is well documented, but less is known regarding their influence on native fishes. Predator-prey tank tests showed both species consumed eggs and larvae of the endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) in a laboratory setting. Tadpoles consumed 2.2 razorback sucker eggs/d and 1.4 razorback sucker larvae/d, while crayfish ate 6.0 eggs/d and 3.5 larvae/d. Relatively high densities of bullfrog tadpoles and crayfish in razorback sucker spawning areas suggest that these nonnative taxa might pose...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Southwestern Naturalist
thumbnail
Efforts to reintroduce razorback suckers Xyrauchen texanus to specific river reaches have been plagued by downstream drift and poor survival, which have been attributed to stress, disorientation, predation, and poor conditioning. Poststocking dispersal of eight test groups (15 fish each) of razorback suckers was examined for 28 d with telemetry equipment. Fish were released in three different locations in the Colorado River basin of Utah, Arizona, and Nevada: (1) a 65,000-ha reservoir, (2) a small (<1-ha) backwater, and (3) a large (30-ha) backwater on the mainstem river. At each location, subgroups were released immediately (reference) or held to acclimate them to the site (3–7 d) before release. Two of four subgroups...
thumbnail
Body reflections in the ultraviolet (UV) are a common occurrence in nature. Despite the abundance of such signals and the presence of UV cones in the retinas of many vertebrates, the function of UV cones in the majority of taxa remains unclear. Here, we report on an unusual communication system in the razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, that involves flash signals produced by quick eye rolls. Behavioural experiments and field observations indicate that this form of communication is used to signal territorial presence between males. The flash signal shows highest contrast in the UV region of fhe visual spectrum (??max???380 nm), corresponding to the maximum wavelength of absorption of the UV cone mechanism in suckers....
thumbnail
No abstract available.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Science Action
thumbnail
Pelagic fish communities (waters with depths >20 m) of Lakes Powell and Mead were examined quarterly from 1995 to 1998 using vertical gill nets and a scientific echosounder. Nets captured a total of 449 fish consisting of striped bass (57%/45% [Lake Powell/Lake Mead]), threadfin shad (24%/50%), common carp (15%/4%), walleye (3%), channel catfish (2%), and rainbow trout (<1%). Each reservoir contained concentrations of pelagic species separated by expanses of habitat with few fish (<10 kg·ha⁻¹). Reservoirs experienced dramatic seasonal and annual fluctuations in pelagic biomass. Lake Powell's biomass peaked at the Colorado River at 709.7 (± 46.5) kg · ha⁻¹ and Lake Mead's reached 291.9 (± 58.2) kg · ha⁻¹ at Las Vegas...
thumbnail
The lower Colorado is among the most regulated rivers in the world. It ranks as the fifth largest river in volume in the coterminous United States, but its flow is fully allocated and no longer reaches the sea. Lower basin reservoirs flood nearly one third of the river channel and store 2 years of annual flow. Diverted water irrigates 1.5 million ha of cropland and provides water for industry and domestic use by 22 million people in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. The native fish community of the lower Colorado River was among the most unique in the world, and the main stem was home to nine freshwater species, all of which were endemic to the basin. Today, five are extirpated, seven are federally...
thumbnail
The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), an endangered big-river fish of the Colorado River basin, has demonstrated no sustainable recruitment in 4 decades, despite presence of spawning adults and larvae. Lack of adequate recruitment has been attributed to several factors, including predation by nonnative fishes. Substantial funding and effort has been expended on mechanically removing nonnative game fishes, typically targeting large predators. As a result, abundance of larger predators has declined, but the abundance of small nonnative fishes has increased in some areas. We conducted laboratory experiments to determine if small nonnative fishes would consume larval razorback suckers. We tested adults of three...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Southwestern Naturalist