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This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015. Sediment organic matter values were collected at a subset of sites. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
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This data table contains mean decomposition rates and mean carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types buried in 7 marshes during 2015. Note that C:N data are repeated for low and high marsh areas at each site in the table. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
[Excerpt from Introduction] "The San Francisco Bay Estuary supports a large and diverse bird community. More than 50% of most Pacific flyway diving duck populations are found in the Estuary during the winter months (Trost 2002; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2002). San Francisco Bay has been designated as a site of international importance for shorebirds (Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network), supporting millions of individuals (Morrison et al. 2001; Takekawa et al. 2001; Warnock et al. 2002), including species that use tidal marsh habitats. In total, the Bay’s tidal marshes support at least 113 bird species that represent 31 families (Takekawa et al., in press)..."
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The research was conducted at eight tidal marshes in coastal estuaries spanning the Washington and Oregon coastlines from Padilla Bay in northern Washington to Bandon located at the mouth of the Coquille River in southern Oregon. The researchers performed bathymetric surveys, created digital elevation models, measured historic rates of mineral and organic matter accumulation, conducted vegetation surveys, deployed water level data loggers, and produced WARMER wetland accretion model projections for each study site. This collection contains data for all of the above across a number of different datasets. Users should investigate the metadata for each item for more information about it's purpose, methods, quality,...
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Lidar-derived digital elevation models often contain a vertical bias due to vegetation. In areas with tidal influence the amount of bias can be ecologically significant, for example, by decreasing the expected inundation frequency. We generated a corrected digital elevation mode (DEM) for Suisun marsh using a modification of the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN) technique (Buffington et al. 2016). GPS survey data (6912 points, collected across public and private land in 2018), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from an airborne multispectral image (June 2018), a 1 m lidar DEM from September 2018, and a 1 m canopy surface model were used to generate models of predicted bias across the...
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Lidar-derived digital elevation models often contain a vertical bias due to vegetation. In areas with tidal influence the amount of bias can be ecologically significant, for example, by decreasing the expected inundation frequency. We generated a corrected digital elevation mode (DEM) for tidal marsh areas around San Francisco Bay using the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN) technique (Buffington et al. 2016). Survey-grade GPS survey data (6614 points), NAIP-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and original 1 m lidar DEM from 2010 were used to generate a model of predicted bias across tidal marsh areas. The predicted bias was then subtracted from the original lidar DEM and merged with the NOAA...
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Digital elevation model outputs from wetland accreting rate model of ecosystem resilience (WARMER) at ten year intervals from 2010-2110. Baseline elevations were collected with RTK GPS units and LiDAR elevations in non-surveyed areas were also corrected using LEAN method. Historical accretion rates were collected at each salt marsh and used to parameterize WARMER, predicting future elevations. These data support the following publication: Rosencranz JA, Thorne KM, Buffington KJ, et al. Sea‚Äźlevel rise, habitat loss, and potential extirpation of a salt marsh specialist bird in urbanized landscapes. Ecol Evol. 2018;00:1–11. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4196
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This data table contains results for the 2014 mesocosm tests of inundation effects on decomposition. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
Abstract (from ScienceDirect): The interannual variability of tidal marsh plant phenology is largely unknown and may have important ecological consequences. Marsh plants are critical to the biogeomorphic feedback processes that build estuarine soils, maintain marsh elevation relative to sea level, and sequester carbon. We calculated Tasseled Cap Greenness, a metric of plant biomass, using remotely sensed data available in the Landsat archive to assess how recent climate variation has affected biomass production and plant phenology across three maritime tidal marshes in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. First, we used clipped vegetation plots at one of our sites to confirm that tasseled cap greenness provided...
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Lidar-derived digital elevation models often contain a vertical bias due to vegetation. In areas with tidal influence the amount of bias can be ecologically significant, for example, by decreasing the expected inundation frequency. We generated a corrected digital elevation model (DEM) for wetlands throughout Collier county using a modification of the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN) technique (Buffington et al. 2016). GPS survey data (15,223 points), NAIP-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (2010), a 10 m lidar DEM from 2007, and a 10 m canopy surface model were used to generate a model of predicted bias across marsh, mangrove, and cypress habitats. The predicted bias was then subtracted from...
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This data table contains summary data for temperature time series in near-surface sediments in high and low tidal marsh at 7 sites during 2015. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
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This table contains data on dry mass remaining in a subset of Salicornia pacifica and Deschampsia cespitosa litter bags removed over a series of time points spanning 6 months. These data support the following publication: Janousek, C.N., Buffington, K.J., Guntenspergen, G.R. et al. Ecosystems (2017). doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-017-0111-6
These datasets provide information on plant alpha, beta, and gamma diversity, and plant species abundance at several spatial scales for tidal wetlands along a salinity gradient in the San Francisco Bay-Delta and an impounded brackish wetland complex in Suisun Marsh, California. Files include diversity metrics calculated at the patch, site, and region scales, average percent cover of wetland dominant plants at the patch scale, and average percent cover of all wetland plants at the site scale. These data support the following paper: Jones, S.F., Janousek, C.N., Casazza, M.L., Takekawa, J.Y. and Thorne, K.M., 2021. Seasonal impoundment alters patterns of tidal wetland plant diversity across spatial scales. Ecosphere,...
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The San Francisco Bay estuary contains the largest remaining expanse of tidal salt marshes in the western U.S. These marshes are home to a variety of federal and state protected species, such as the California clapper rail, California black rail, and the salt marsh harvest mouse. The estuary is also located on the Pacific Flyway, and is an important site for migrating and wintering birds. As climate conditions change, these salt marshes face a number of threats, including accelerated rates of sea-level rise, shifting precipitation, erosion, and more frequent and intense storms. Seas in the San Francisco Bay estuary have been rising 2.2 centimeters per decade, and could rise by as much as 1.24 meters by 2100, according...
In the Pacific Northwest, coastal wetlands support a wealth of ecosystem services including habitat provision for wildlife and fisheries and flood protection. The tidal marshes, mudflats, and shallow bays of coastal estuaries link marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats and provide economic and recreational benefits to local communities. Climate change effects such as sea-level rise are currently altering these habitats, but we know little about how these areas will change over the next 50-100 years. Our study examined the effects of sea-level rise on nine tidal marshes in Washington and Oregon, with the goal of providing scientific data to support future coastal planning and conservation. We compiled physical...
Mangrove forests are likely vulnerable to accelerating sea-level rise; however, we lack the tools necessary to understand their future resilience. On the Pacific island of Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, mangroves are habitat to endangered species and provide critical ecosystem services that support local communities. We developed a generalizable modeling framework for mangroves that accounts for species interactions and the belowground processes that dictate soil elevation. The modeling framework was calibrated with extensive field datasets, including accretion rates derived from thirty 1-meter-deep soil cores dated with lead-210, more than 300 forest inventory plots, water-level monitoring, and differential...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Digital elevation model outputs from wetland accreting rate model of ecosystem resilience (WARMER) at ten year intervals from 2010-2110. Baseline elevations were collected with RTK GPS units and LiDAR elevations in non-surveyed areas were also corrected using LEAN method. Historical accretion rates were collected at each salt marsh and used to parameterize WARMER, predicting future elevations.
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To assess the current topography of tidal marsh at the study sites we conducted survey-grade global positioning system (GPS) surveys between 2009 and 2014 using a Leica RX1200 Real Time Kinematic (RTK) rover (±1 cm horizontal, ±2 cm vertical accuracy; Leica Geosystems Inc., Norcross, GA; Figure 4). At sites with RTK GPS network coverage (Padilla, Port Susan, Nisqually, Siletz, Bull Island, and Bandon), rover positions were received in real time from the Leica Smartnet system via a CDMA modem (www.lecia-geosystems.com). At sites without network coverage (Skokomish, Grays Harbor, and Willapa), rover positions were received in real time from a Leica GS10 antenna base station via radio link. At sites where we used the...


map background search result map search result map Fate of Endangered Species in San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes with Sea-Level Rise Inundation Experiments, 2014 Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015 Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015 Sediment Temperature, 2015 Linear loss of litter over time, 2015 Digital elevation model outputs from wetland accreting rate model of ecosystem resilience (WARMER) at ten year intervals from 2010-2110 Seal Beach salt marsh digital elevation model output, sea-level rise scenarios, 2010-2110 Field and model data for studying the effects of sea-level rise on eight tidal marshes in coastal Washington and Oregon Digital Elevation Models for eight study areas in coastal Oregon and Washington, 2012 LEAN-corrected San Francisco Bay digital elevation model, 2018 LEAN-Corrected DEM for Suisun Marsh LEAN-Corrected Collier County DEM for wetlands Impounded and tidal wetland plant diversity and composition across spatial scales, San Francisco Bay-Delta, California, USA (2016-2018) Seal Beach salt marsh digital elevation model output, sea-level rise scenarios, 2010-2110 LEAN-Corrected DEM for Suisun Marsh Fate of Endangered Species in San Francisco Bay Tidal Marshes with Sea-Level Rise LEAN-corrected San Francisco Bay digital elevation model, 2018 LEAN-Corrected Collier County DEM for wetlands Impounded and tidal wetland plant diversity and composition across spatial scales, San Francisco Bay-Delta, California, USA (2016-2018) Digital elevation model outputs from wetland accreting rate model of ecosystem resilience (WARMER) at ten year intervals from 2010-2110 Digital Elevation Models for eight study areas in coastal Oregon and Washington, 2012 Field and model data for studying the effects of sea-level rise on eight tidal marshes in coastal Washington and Oregon Inundation Experiments, 2014 Decomposition rates and carbon:nitrogen ratios for different litter types, 2015 Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015 Sediment Temperature, 2015 Linear loss of litter over time, 2015