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Identifying the Risk of Runoff and Erosion in Hawaiʻi’s National Parks

Helping the National Park Service to Identify Vegetation Management Areas at Risk from Runoff and Erosion in Hawaiʻi
Principal Investigator
Lucas Fortini

Dates

Start Date
2018-06-28
End Date
2022-01-05
Release Date
2018

Summary

Haleakalā National Park (HNP) and the surrounding landscape spans many different land cover types, some of which are undergoing vegetation changes that can reduce the amount of water that infiltrates into soil. Decreased soil infiltration can lead to the erosion of terrestrial habitats, increases in the amount of sediment entering aquatic habitats, and flooding of downstream areas as runoff increases after storms. Currently, HNP managers are attempting to control runoff and erosion to avoid loss and damage within park boundaries and parks located downstream. Managers in HNP have expressed a need for information on current and future runoff and erosion risk to help prioritize management within the park and other DOI-managed lands across [...]

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Haleakala.jpg
“Haleakala National Park - Credit: Jackie Frost, NPS ”
thumbnail 2.25 MB image/jpeg

Purpose

Land cover driven changes in soil infiltration lead to changes in runoff and erosion within lands managed by DOI and partners across Hawaii. Consequently, reduced infiltration within these lands may lead to serious consequences to management of these lands including terrestrial habitat damage by erosion, aquatic habitat damage by sedimentation, and downstream damage by flooding due to higher storm flows. Haleakala National Park, the second largest DOI land management unit in Hawaii, is one such place facing the challenge of controlling runoff and erosion to avoid loss and damage within its boundaries and to partners downstream. Unfortunately, up to now little information regarding current and future runoff risks has been available to inform management within Haleakala and the surrounding landscape.

Project Extension

parts
typeTechnical Summary
valueLand cover driven changes in soil infiltration lead to changes in runoff and erosion within lands managed by DOI and partners across Hawaii. Consequently, reduced infiltration within these lands may lead to serious consequences to management of these lands including terrestrial habitat damage by erosion, aquatic habitat damage by sedimentation, and downstream damage by flooding due to higher storm flows. Haleakala National Park, the second largest DOI land management unit in Hawaii, is one such place facing the challenge of controlling runoff and erosion to avoid loss and damage within its boundaries and to partners downstream. Unfortunately, up to now little information regarding current and future runoff risks has been available to inform management within Haleakala and the surrounding landscape.
projectStatusIn Progress

Budget Extension

annualBudgets
year2018
totalFunds165788.0
parts
typeAward Type
valueCOA
typeAward Number
valueC18000219
totalFunds165788.0

Haleakala National Park - Credit: Jackie Frost, NPS
Haleakala National Park - Credit: Jackie Frost, NPS

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ScienceBase WMS

Communities

  • National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers
  • Pacific Islands CASC

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Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
RegistrationUUID NCCWSC 22373bab-f372-4a96-83ab-1e261f00d3de
StampID NCCWSC PI18-CH1511

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