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Factors that affect parasitism of black-tailed prairie dogs by fleas

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Eads, D.A., and J.L. Hoogland. 2016. Factors that affect parasitism of black-tailed prairie dogs by fleas. Ecosphere doi:10.1002/ecs2.1372.

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Fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) are hematophagous ectoparasites that feed on vertebrate hosts. Fleas can reduce the fitness of hosts by interfering with immune responses, disrupting adaptive behaviors, and transmitting pathogens. The negative effects of fleas on hosts are usually most pronounced when fleas attain high densities. In lab studies, fleas desiccate and die under dry conditions, suggesting that populations of fleas will tend to decline when precipitation is scarce under natural conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared precipitation vs. parasitism of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) by fleas at a single colony during May and June of 13 consecutive years (1976–1988) at Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, [...]

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Type Scheme Key
local-index unknown 70179082
local-pk unknown 70179082
doi http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/mods-outline-3-5.html#identifier doi:10.1002/ecs2.1372
series unknown Ecosphere

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citationTypeArticle
journalEcosphere
languageEnglish
parts
typevolume
value7
typeissue
value7

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