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Foundational Science Area: Helping People and Nature Adapt to Climate Change in the North Central U.S.

Building our Foundational Understanding: Helping Land Managers Adapt to Climate Change (2014-2016)

Dates

Start Date
2014-09-05
End Date
2018-09-04
Release Date
2014

Summary

The north-central region of the U.S. has experienced a series of extreme droughts in recent years, with impacts felt across a range of sectors. For example, the impacts of a 2002 drought are estimated to have resulted in a $3 billion loss to the agricultural sector in Nebraska and South Dakota. Meanwhile, the ecological impacts of drought in the region have included increased tree mortality, surges in the outbreak of pests, and intensifying forest fires. Located within this region is the Missouri River Basin, an important agricultural production area home to approximately 12 million people, including 28 Native American tribes. Tribal governments and multiple federal agencies manage land and natural resources in the drought-impacted [...]

Child Items (4)

Contacts

Principal Investigator :
Dennis Ojima
Funding Agency :
North Central CSC
Co-Investigator :
Shannon McNeeley
Project Team :
Shannon McNeeley
CMS Group :
Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASC) Program

Attached Files

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WindRiverIndainReservation_WY_RolfBlauert_MPD.jpg
“Wind River Indian Reservation, WY - Credit: Rolf Blauert”
thumbnail 362.72 KB

Purpose

The goal of this proposed project is to develop a better understanding of drought vulnerabilities, risks, and responses in high-risk, multi-jurisdictional landscapes across the Missouri River Basin area that extends from the Rocky Mountains into the Great Plains. Our research poses the following questions: • How do different resource managers from the Department of Interior (DOI), other federal agencies, and tribal communities perceive and characterize drought risk in the same geographic area? • How are their respective grassland/rangeland, fish and wildlife, and forest management decisions affected by those drought risk perceptions? • What are their differential capacities for responding to and preparing for drought risks? To investigate these questions, we will employ an interdisciplinary Social-ecological Systems (SES) approach, to include the utilization of drought indicators with natural resource managers and conducting key stakeholder interviews and workshops. Our Adaptation team will collaborate with the Climate Impacts and Physical Climate foundational science teams on three specific drought-theme cases in pre-existing defined study areas: • Northwest Colorado • Southwest South Dakota • Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

Project Extension

parts
typeTechnical Summary
valueThe Adaptation team will continue to lead the Drought Risk and Adaptation in the Interior (DRAI) project that began in 2013. The purpose of this research is to understand how different federal and tribal natural resource managers experience and deal with drought in cross-jurisdictional landscapes that contain public and private operations on or near DOI, USDA/US Forest Service, and/or tribal lands in the Missouri River Basin. The goal of this proposed project is to develop a better understanding of drought social-ecological system vulnerabilities, risks, and responses in high-risk, multi-jurisdictional landscapes across the North Central domain, extending from the Rocky Mountains into the Great Plains. Our research poses the following questions: • How do different resource managers from the Department of Interior (DOI), other federal agencies, and tribal communities perceive and characterize drought risk in the same geographic area? • How are their respective grassland/rangeland, fish and wildlife, and forest management decisions affected by those drought risk perceptions? • What are their differential capacities for responding to and preparing for drought risks? To investigate these questions, we will employ an iterative, interdisciplinary Social-ecological Systems (SES) approach, to include the utilization of drought indicators with natural resource managers and conducting key stakeholder interviews and workshops. The continued building and refinement of the SES DRAI database will guide the climate and ecosystems analyses on drought indicators, and will help the objective for climate scientists to better understand how to frame their climate analysis and outcomes to make them more useful and usable to different natural resource managers operating in shared landscapes. Led by the work of the Adaptation team, the foundational teams will also collaborate on three specific drought-theme cases. These locations for these cases are chosen based on the work of the adaptation and vulnerability team in the DRAI assessments: • Northwest Colorado DRAI study area • Soutwest South Dakota DRAI study area • Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming DRAI study area
projectStatusCompleted

Budget Extension

annualBudgets
year2014
totalFunds54530.0
year2015
totalFunds100000.0
year2016
totalFunds108730.0
parts
typeAward Type
valueGrant
typeAward Number
valueG14AP00180
totalFunds263260.0

Additional Information

Alternate Titles

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
RegistrationUUID NCCWSC aecfacf8-d390-4ebd-9075-efa94774ca78
StampID NCCWSC NC14-MJ0061

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