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Collecting and Applying Schitsu’umsh Indigenous Knowledge and Practices to Climate Change Decision Making

Schitsu’umsh Relationships with Their Dynamic Landscapes: Identifying, Managing and Applying Indigenous Knowledge and Praxis (Funded Jointly by the Northwest CSC and NCCWSC)

Dates

Start Date
2014-07-11
End Date
2015-08-31
Release Date
2014

Summary

The Schitsu'umsh people (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Idaho) have an intimate relationship with their landscape and a rich knowledge of how to interact with the environment in a way that benefits human, plant, and animal communities alike. Such knowledge and practices can provide valuable insight as to how tribal and non-tribal resource managers, communities, and governments can best respond to the effects of a changing climate. This project was a pilot effort to collect and translate indigenous knowledge and practices into shareable formats. Researchers developed documents, images, lesson plans, and innovative, interactive 3-D virtual reality simulations that effectively convey Schitsu’umsh knowledge and practices and supply recommendations [...]

Child Items (4)

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NCCW-2014-6_MudLake_ID_AlanCressler.jpg
“Mud Lake, Idaho - Credit: Alan Cressler”
thumbnail 193.94 KB

Purpose

The Schitsu'umsh people (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Idaho) have an intimate kinship-based relationship with their landscape. That relationship is predicated on a particular configuration of knowledge and praxis, which can offer insights and best practices into how to effectively engage a dynamic landscape in a manner beneficial to interrelated human, animal, and plant communities. The Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC), the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC), the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, and the University of Idaho's Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) worked to identify the indigenous knowledge and practices of the Schitsu'umsh people that underlie their interactions with the historically dynamic environment of the Palouse, a major Northwest agricultural area. This pilot project inventoried and organized traditional indigenous knowledge (TEK) and contextual information (metadata) while developing a set of best practices for tribal-governmental collaborative ethnographic and scientific research. Products can be modified and expanded for other tribal and non-tribal communities throughout the United States as they address the social and environmental effects of climate change.

Project Extension

projectStatusCompleted

Budget Extension

annualBudgets
year2014
fundingSources
amount18000.0
sourceNW CSC
totalFunds18000.0
totalFunds18000.0

Mud Lake, Idaho - Credit: Alan Cressler
Mud Lake, Idaho - Credit: Alan Cressler

Map

Spatial Services

ScienceBase WMS

Communities

  • National CASC
  • National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers
  • Northwest CASC

Associated Items

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Provenance

DEPTH-2.4.1

Additional Information

Expando Extension

object
agendas
themes
number1
nameClimate Science & Modeling
options
number2
nameResponse of Physical Systems to Climate Change
options
number3
nameResponse of Biological Systems to Climate Change
options
atrue
number4
nameVulnerability and Adaptation
options
btrue
number5
nameMonitoring and Observation Systems
options
number6
nameData, Infrastructure, Analysis, and Modeling
options
etrue
number7
nameCommunication of Science Findings
options
btrue
nameNorthwest CSC Agenda
urlhttp://www.doi.gov/csc/northwest/upload/NW-CSC-Science-Agenda-2012-2015.pdf

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