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Managing water and riparian habitats on the Bill Williams River with scientific benefit for other desert river systems

Dates

Creation
2014-03-14 19:51:51
Last Update
2017-09-08 22:18:27
Start Date
2013-10-01
End Date
2014-09-30
Start Date
2013-10-01 05:00:00
End Date
2014-09-30 05:00:00

Citation

LCC Network Data Steward(Point of Contact), Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative(administrator), John Hickey(Principal Investigator), Andrew Hautzinger(Co-Investigator), Dick Gilbert(Co-Investigator), Patrick B Shafroth(Co-Investigator), Steven Sesnie(Co-Investigator), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service(Cooperator/Partner), U.S. Geological Survey(Cooperator/Partner), 2014-03-14(creation), 2017-09-08(lastUpdate), 2013-10-01(Start), 2014-09-30(End), Managing water and riparian habitats on the Bill Williams River with scientific benefit for other desert river systems, https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/53235dd7e4b07f555751f5b1

Summary

The importance of riparian ecosystems in semiarid and arid regions has generated interest in understanding processes that drive the distribution and abundance of dominant riparian plants. Changes in streamflow patterns downstream of dams have profoundly affected riparian vegetation composition and structure. For example, in the southwestern United States, flow regulation has contributed to the replacement of many riparian forests historically dominated by the native Populus fremontii (Fremont Cottonwood) and Salix gooddingii (Goodding’s Willow) by the exotic species Tamarix spp. (Salt Cedar). The proposed project will help guide reservoir release decision making to enhance downstream recruitment of native cottonwood and willow stands [...]

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Attached Files

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Support_BOR_R13PG80649_FY13.pdf 73 KB
Proposal_BOR_R13PG80649_FY13.pdf 29.64 KB
FinalReport_BOR_R13PG80649_FY13.pdf 4.87 MB
md_metadata.json 144.84 KB
metadata.xml
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105.51 KB

Purpose

Codify flow-ecology relationships for riparian species of the Bill Williams River as operational rules for water managers. Test rules under different climate scenarios. Revise rules as needed to mitigate the effects of climate change such that rules will allow responsible and adaptive management of water and riparian habitats.

Project Extension

projectProducts
productDescriptionReport
statusDelivered
productDescriptionMethodology/Protocol
statusDelivered
productDescriptionPresentation
statusDelivered
projectStatusCompleted

Budget Extension

annualBudgets
year2013
fundingSources
amount95000.0
recipientUS Army Corps of Engineers
sourceU.S. Bureau of Reclamation
totalFunds95000.0
year2013
fundingSources
amount128000.0
recipientUS Army Corps of Engineers
sourceUS Army Corps of Engineers
matchingtrue
totalFunds128000.0
totalFunds223000.0

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
USBR USBR R13PG80649

Expando Extension


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