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Landscape Connectivity of Isolated Waters for Wildlife in the Sonoran Desert

Dates

Creation
2014-03-14 19:50:38
Last Update
2017-11-03 19:58:11
Start Date
2013-09-01
End Date
2015-08-31
Start Date
2013-09-01 05:00:00
End Date
2015-08-31 05:00:00

Citation

LCC Network Data Steward(Point of Contact), Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative(administrator), Kerry L Griffis-Kyle(Principal Investigator), Dr. Nancy E. McIntyre(Co-Investigator), U.S. Bureau of Land Management(Cooperator/Partner), U.S. National Park Service(Cooperator/Partner), USFWS - Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge(Cooperator/Partner), USFWS - Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge(Cooperator/Partner), 2014-03-14(creation), 2017-11-03(lastUpdate), 2013-09-01(Start), 2015-08-31(End), Landscape Connectivity of Isolated Waters for Wildlife in the Sonoran Desert, https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/53235d8ee4b07f555751f5aa

Summary

Texas Tech University will conduct quantitative and predictive analysis of the connectivity of isolated desert “wetlands”, that include tinajas, the name for eroded pools in bedrock, for 20 wildlife species over the Sonoran desert ecoregion. Potential loss of wetlands due to climate change will also be studied to identify high value areas that can be prioritized for future restoration efforts and targeted for better management practices.Target species for landscape connectivity analysis include:Colorado River toad ( Incilius alverius )American bullfrog ( Lithobates catesbeianus )Chiricahua leopard frog ( Lithobates chiricahuensis )Lowland leopard frog ( Lithobates yavapaiensis )Couch’s spadefoot ( Scaphiopus couchii )Plains spadefoot [...]

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Proposal_BOR_R13AC80035_FY13.pdf 1.82 MB
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Purpose

Provide a quantitative and predictive analysis of landscape connectivity for 20 wildlife species over the Sonoran Desert ecoregion in the United States based on climate change and water type. Focal species are selected based on their vulnerability to changes in ephemeral water (most amphibians in the region) and interest by managers (invasive species, game species and threatened and endangered species).

Project Extension

parts
typeShort Project Description
valueTexas Tech University will conduct quantitative and predictive analysis of the connectivity of isolated desert "wetlands", that include tinajas, the name for eroded pools in bedrock, for 20 wildlife species over the Sonoran desert ecoregion. Potential loss of wetlands due to climate change will also be studied to identify high value areas that can be prioritized for future restoration efforts and targeted for better management practices. Target species for landscape connectivity analysis include: Colorado River toad ( Incilius alverius ) American bullfrog ( Lithobates catesbeianus ) Chiricahua leopard frog ( Lithobates chiricahuensis ) Lowland leopard frog ( Lithobates yavapaiensis ) Couch’s spadefoot ( Scaphiopus couchii ) Plains [...]
projectStatusCompleted

Budget Extension

annualBudgets
year2013
fundingSources
amount85424.0
recipientTexas Tech University
sourceU.S. Bureau of Reclamation
totalFunds85424.0
totalFunds85424.0

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
USBR FOA R13AS80009

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