Skip to main content

Control of Tamarix in the Western United States: implications for water salvage, wildlife use, and riparian restoration

Citation

John P Taylor, Patrick B Shafroth, Edwin P Weeks, James R Cleverly, James N Stuart, and Tom L Dudley, Control of Tamarix in the Western United States: implications for water salvage, wildlife use, and riparian restoration: .

Summary

Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North America. Many resource managers seek to reduce saltcedar abundance and control its spread to increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration, to restore native riparian (streamside) vegetation, and to improve wildlife habitat. However, increased water yield might not always occur and has been substantially lower than expected in water salvage experiments, the potential for successful revegetation is variable, and not all wildlife taxa clearly prefer native plant habitats over saltcedar. As a result, there is [...]

Contacts

Attached Files

Click on title to download individual files attached to this item.

metadata.xml 2.87 KB

Communities

  • Upper Colorado River Basin

Tags

Provenance

From Source - Mendeley RIS export <br> On - Tue May 10 10:59:48 CDT 2011

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
Title Citation Control of Tamarix in the Western United States: implications for water salvage, wildlife use, and riparian restoration

Citation Extension

citationTypeMendeley
noteNotes
tableOfContentsTable of Contents

Item Actions

View Item as ...

Save Item as ...

View Item...