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Biogeographic barriers, connectivity and homogenization of freshwater faunas: it's a small world after all

Citation

Rahel, Frank J, Biogeographic barriers, connectivity and homogenization of freshwater faunas: it's a small world after all: .

Summary

Summary 1. Historically, biogeographic barriers to the movement of aquatic organisms existed at multiple spatial scales and contributed to the development of unique regional faunas. At increasing spatial scales, these barriers consisted of waterfalls and cascades; catchment divides; major mountain ranges and oceans. This hierarchy of movement barriers produced increasingly distinct aquatic biotas at larger drainage units. 2. Humans have provided a variety of pathways by which aquatic species can circumvent historical biogeographic barriers. These include both authorised and unauthorised stocking, construction of canals and water conveyance systems, transport in ship ballast water, fishing and angling gear (including boats) transferred [...]

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Author :
Rahel, Frank J

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Title Citation Biogeographic barriers, connectivity and homogenization of freshwater faunas: it's a small world after all

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