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W.I. Boarman

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Movement patterns of juvenile birds are poorly understood, yet critically important ecological phenomena, especially for species with a prolonged juvenile period. We evaluated postfledging movements of juvenile common ravens (Corvus corax) in a western Mojave Desert landscape composed of a mosaic of natural and anthropogenic elements. Generally, ravens do not begin breeding until after their fourth year. We marked 2 annual cohorts of juvenile ravens and followed them from dispersal from their natal territory for up to 33 months. Movements of juvenile common ravens were similar for males and females. Conspecifics and confined livestock feeding operations represented important resources for juvenile ravens, and juveniles...
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Subsidized predators may affect prey abundance, distribution, and demography. Common Ravens (Corvus corax) are anthropogenically subsidized throughout their range and, in the Mojave Desert, have increased in number dramatically over the last 3-4 decades. Human-provided food resources are thought to be important drivers of raven population growth, but human developments add other features as well, such as nesting platforms. From 1996 to 2000, we examined the nesting ecology of ravens in the Mojave Desert, relative to anthropogenic development. Ravens nested disproportionately near point sources of food and water subsidies (such as towns, landfills, and ponds) but not near roads (sources of road-killed carrion), even...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecological Applications
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We surveyed 7 species of predatory birds weekly during a 12-month period (December 1992 through November 1993) in the east Mojave Desert, California. The Common Raven (Corvus corax) was the most frequently observed species with an average of 6.9 sightings per 100 km. Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura), Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Loggerhead Shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) were seen in decreasing order of frequency of observation through the study period. Ravens, Red-tailed Hawks, Loggerhead Shrikes, American Kestrels, and Prairie Falcons were seen throughout the year. Turkey Vultures were not present...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Great Basin Naturalist
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