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Villette, Petra

Estimating population densities of small mammals (< 100 g) has typically been carried out by intensive livetrapping, but this technique may be stressful to animals and the effort required is considerable. Here, we used camera traps to detect small mammal presence and assessed if this provided a feasible alternative to livetrapping for density estimation. During 2010-2012, we used camera trapping in conjunction with mark-recapture livetrapping to estimate the density of northern red-backed voles (Myodes rutilus) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in the boreal forest of Yukon, Canada. Densities for these 2 species ranged from 0.29 to 9.21 animals/ha and 0 to 5.90 animals/ha, respectively, over the course of this...
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Live trapping is one of the methods typically used to estimate population densities of small mammals, but this is labor-intensive and can be stressful to individuals. We assess the use of camera trap hit (detection) rates as a noninvasive alternative to live trapping for estimating population densities of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus (Erxleben, 1777)) and red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus (Erxleben, 1777))—two common small (≤1.5 kg) mammal species in the boreal forests of northern North America. We compared hit rates from camera trapping to live trapping mark-recapture density estimates and asked if the hit window—the length of time used to group consecutive videos together as single detections or “hits”—has...
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