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University of Nevada - Reno

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FY2013Cheatgrass die-offs are unexplained instances of stand failure observed in areas of Nevada and Utah, where cheatgrass fails to grow even though it has been a dominant component of plant communities in the past. The goals of this project are to:1) provide information on the size and extent of historic (1985 - 2012) die-offs in the Winnemucca area using satellite imagery, and 2) determine if die-offs are restoration opportunities by planting and monitoring local and commercially available native grasses in die-off areas.Support is requested to fund monitoring of the restoration project through a second growing season and to develop predictive spatial models of die-off from analysis of satellite imagery and GIS...
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FY2014This projects main goals are to assess the effects of grazing by feral horses and livestock on Greater Sage-grouse demography and habitats. The Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex and adjacent lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management provide the unique opportunity to assess sage-grouse populations free of feral horses and livestock grazing, populations that only have feral horses, as well as populations that coincide with both livestock grazing and feral horses. The project team will:1)Use historical sage-grouse data collected from Hart Mountain before and immediately after livestock were removed in the early 1990s, and historical data from Sheldon before the irruption of feral horses...
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FY2010In addition to regional Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge projects that the Great Basin LCC (GBLCC) supports, GBLCC staff lend technical expertise to a range of projects and have contributed to important regional publications on a range of subjects. These publications range in type from textbooks, to management-oriented science and conservation plans, to scientific papers and have covered subjects like wind erosion following fire, soil microbiota response to drought, plant community resilience to invasive species, and alpine plant communities. In many cases these publications form foundations for scientifically-informed management strategies across the Great Basin.
FY2016Monitor the diversity and abundance of winged insects (including Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Hemiptera), which include many key insect pollinators, using an array of passive and active trapping methods. Monitor bat diversity and relative densities using passive acoustic monitoring stations (we will use full-spectrum passive recording units). Monitor diversity and abundance of reptiles (lizards and snakes), using trap arrays (pitfall and coverboard) and time-constrained visual encounter surveys. Create empirically supported models of reptile, bat, and insect diversity and abundance as a function of vegetation structure and composition, microclimate, and other environmental variables,...
FY2014Land management agencies seek to understand how organisms use the landscape in order to develop management strategies that maintain healthy, resilient communities that have the ecological and evolutionary potential to respond to climate change. An ideal approach to understanding how organisms move through the landscape is by inferring ongoing and historic movements from patterns of genetic continuity that characterize regional sets of populations. From patterns of genetic connectivity we can infer the habitat and landscape characteristics that facilitate animal movement and species range shifts over both short and long timescales. Knowing the spatial distribution of critical linkages or corridors allows conservation...
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