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University of Nevada, Reno

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This dissertation presents results from four recently discovered archeological sites in southcentral Alaska. The sites range from the Younger Dryas to middle Holocene in age and provide valuable contextual information for the human process of colonizing a region that was heavily glaciated during the LGM. The deglaciation and human colonization of southcentral Alaska is one of the most significant aspects of the settling phase in eastern Beringia not only for its potential to inform about the human response to post-glacial landscapes but also for what we can learn about subsequent migrations to the southern coast of Alaska. Understanding how early foraging societies spread throughout eastern Beringia, after its initial...
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The Mohave ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus mohavensis), named just over a century ago (Merriam 1889), is precinctive to the western Mojave Desert in California, USA, and occupies portions of Kern, Los Angeles, Inyo and San Bernardino counties (Best 1995). Early estimates of the geographic range of the squirrel are just 20,000 km2 in area (Hall 1981, Zeiner et al. 1988‐ 1990), one of the smallest distributions among North American ground squirrel species (Hoyt 1972, P. Leitner – pers. obs.). The closest living relative of the Mohave ground squirrel (MGS) is the round‐tailed ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus tereticaudus). Mohave ground squirrels have a “shorter tail with distichous hairs and white undersurface”,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The initial habitat suitability model estimates pre‐European suitable habitat of the Mohave ground squirrel (MGS, Xerospermophilus mohavensis) covering 19,023 km2. Impact scenarios predicted that between 10 percent and 16 percent of suitable habitat has been lost to historical human disturbances, and up to an additional 10 percent may be affected by renewable energy development in the near future. These figures are the result of analyses conducted solely on public lands. State and private lands in the region also have pending proposals for renewable energy on 260 km2, and an additional 3,500 km2 may be available for renewable energy. The sum of potential habitat disturbance on public, State, and private lands could...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
FY2016This project will develop a strategic approach for conservation of wet meadows and riparian ecosystems and the species they support that focuses on threats caused by natural and anthropogenic disturbance. It uses information on (1) the factors that affect wet meadow and riparian ecosystem resilience to both natural and human-caused disturbances at the scale of the watershed and meadow or riparian ecosystem, and (2) the distributions and population abundances of at risk species to determine focal areas for management. Maps of the relative resilience of watersheds and wet meadows are overlaid with data on at risk species and the predominant threats to facilitate this process. Decision matrices are developed...
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FY2013Cheatgrass die-offs are unexplained instances of stand failure observed in areas of Nevada and Utah, where cheatgrass fails to grow even though it has been a dominant component of plant communities in the past. The goals of this project are to:1) provide information on the size and extent of historic (1985 - 2012) die-offs in the Winnemucca area using satellite imagery, and 2) determine if die-offs are restoration opportunities by planting and monitoring local and commercially available native grasses in die-off areas.Support is requested to fund monitoring of the restoration project through a second growing season and to develop predictive spatial models of die-off from analysis of satellite imagery and GIS...
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