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University of Massachusetts, Department of Environmental Conservation

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To evaluate the potential effects of climate change on wildlife habitat and ecological integrity in the northeastern United States from 2010 to 2080, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team derived a set of climate projections at a fine spatial resolution for the entire Northeast. The projections are based upon publicly available climate models.This dataset represents the growing season degree days (number of days in which the average temperature is > 10 degrees C) using one of two IPCC greenhouse gas concentration scenarios (RCP4.5). The dataset is intended to represent typical growing season degree days for the year 2080 rather than the actual growing season degree days. MAP UNITS ARE THE SUM OF DEGREES THAT...
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To evaluate the potential effects of climate change on wildlife habitat and ecological integrity in the northeastern United States from 2010 to 2080, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team derived a set of climate projections at a fine spatial resolution for the entire Northeast. The projections are based upon publicly available climate models.This dataset represents the mean of the minimum air temperature (degrees C) for December, January, and February using one of two IPCC greenhouse gas concentration scenarios (RCP4.5). The dataset is intended to represent typical winter temperatures in the decade centered on 2060 rather than the actual temperatures during 2060. MAP UNITS ARE TEMP. IN DEGREES C MULTIPLIED...
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To evaluate the potential effects of climate change on wildlife habitat and ecological integrity in the northeastern United States from 2010 to 2080, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team derived a set of climate projections at a fine spatial resolution for the entire Northeast. The projections are based upon publicly available climate models.This dataset represents the mean of the minimum air temperature (degrees C) for December, January, and February using one of two IPCC greenhouse gas concentration scenarios (RCP4.5). The dataset is intended to represent typical winter temperatures in the decade centered on 2080 rather than the actual temperatures during 2080. MAP UNITS ARE TEMP. IN DEGREES C MULTIPLIED...
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To evaluate the potential effects of climate change on wildlife habitat and ecological integrity in the northeastern United States from 2010 to 2080, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team derived a set of climate projections at a fine spatial resolution for the entire Northeast. The projections are based upon publicly available climate models.This dataset represents the growing season degree days (number of days in which the average temperature is > 10 degrees C) using one of two IPCC greenhouse gas concentration scenarios (RCP8.5). The dataset is intended to represent typical growing season degree days for the year 2060 rather than the actual growing season degree days. MAP UNITS ARE THE SUM OF DEGREES THAT...
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To evaluate the potential effects of climate change on wildlife habitat and ecological integrity in the northeastern United States from 2010 to 2080, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team derived a set of climate projections at a fine spatial resolution for the entire Northeast. The projections are based upon publicly available climate models.This dataset represents the mean of the maximum air temperature (degrees C) for June, July, and August for the year 2070 using one of two IPCC greenhouse gas concentration scenarios (RCP8.5). The dataset is intended to represent typical summer temperatures in the decade centered on 2070. MAP UNITS ARE TEMP. IN DEGREES C MULTIPLIED BY 100 (which allows for more efficient...
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