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University of California Santa Cruz

This dataset contains monthly average hours of fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) per day for North and Central Coastal California. The set of 42 grids has one for each summer month (June, July, August, and September) for each year (1999 - 2009), except for 2 missing months (June 2001 and August 2006) . Grid cell values were calculated using eleven years of hourly, day and night, cloud maps derived from geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) images collected and processed by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA).For more information about this data and the Pacific Coastal Fog Project, see http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/fog (link is external) (link is external) and this article...
BayGEO Journal Article by Alicia Torregrosa explaining the challenges of mapping fog and the techniques used to create the Fog and Low Cloud Cover map generated from GOES imagery. Karl the Fog is a twitter handle @KarlTheFog for fog watchers.Intro:Within the world of mapping, clouds are a pesky interference to be removed from satellite remote sensed imagery. However, to many of us, that is a waste of pixels. Cloud maps are becoming increasingly valuable in the quest to understand land cover change and surface processes. In coastal California, the dynamic summertime interactions between air masses, the ocean, and topography result in blankets of fog and low clouds flowing into low lying areas of the San Francisco...
A survey of natural resource specialists and land managers was conducted at the beginning of the Pacific Coastal Fog Project. Survey results showed that the most urgently needed dataset was a fog frequency map to help make better natural resource decisions for ecosystem restoration, conservation, and preparing for future climate conditions. Fog maps like these could show which areas receive more or less (or no) fog. This data would help land managers understand the influence of fog on patterns of vegetation distribution, wildfire severity, and stream temperature.The U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) has used satellite camera imagery feeds since 1960 to improve real-time weather forecasting. Originally the images...
To climate scientists, marine fog’s physical opacity symbolizes how much remains to be discovered about the atmospheric phenomenon. This article outlines what is known and unknown about fog and its relationship with climate change.
The raster grids in this dataset show the relative amount of summertime fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) over a decade for North and Central Coastal California on either a monthly or annual basis. Summertime FLCC is calculated as the average FLCC hours per day from an archive of hourly, day and night, June, July, August, and September, 1999 - 2009, GOES (geostationary operational environmental satellite) images collected and processed into ~26, 000 cloud maps by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA). These decadal average FLCC rasters do not include years 2001 and 2006 due to missing or incomplete data for June 2001 and August 2006.Layers included:Files, Description1 Decadal Summer (average...
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