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USDA Forest Service

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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
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This layer provides information on putative winter corridors facilitating dispersal from northern populations to patches capable of supporting Canada lynx in the Northern Rocky Mountains. These results combine resource selection, step selection, and least-cost path models to define movement corridors for lynx in the Northern Rocky Mountains. The illustrated corridors were created by using a one-mile buffer around the putative winter corridors facilitating dispersal from northern populations to patches capable of supporting Canada lynx in the Northern Rocky Mountains
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Many mountain ecosystems are experiencing coincident increases in temperature, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. All are important controls on rates of plant growth, soil microbial activity, nutrient cycling, and stream N export. It is difficult for experimental studies to explore ecosystem responses to more than one or two treatments at plot, let alone catchment, scale. One might expect, however, ecosystems to respond differently to the combined global change drivers than to climate, CO2, or N alone. We explored this question for nine mountain catchments over the period 1980- 2075 with a simulation model.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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An area encompassing all the National Forest System lands within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) administered by an administrative unit. The area encompasses private lands, other governmental agency lands, and may contain National Forest System lands within the proclaimed boundaries of another administrative unit. All National Forest System lands fall within one and only one Administrative Forest Area.
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The capacity of ecosystems to provide services such as carbon storage, clean water, and forest products is determined not only by variations in ecosystem properties across landscapes, but also by ecosystem dynamics over time. ForWarn is a system developed by the U.S. Forest Service to monitor vegetation change using satellite imagery for the continental United States. It provides near real-time change maps that are updated every eight days, and summaries of these data also provide long-term change maps from 2000 to the present.Based on the detection of change in vegetation productivity, the ForWarn system monitors the effects of disturbances such as wildfires, insects, diseases, drought, and other effects of weather,...
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