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USDA Forest Service

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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
Knowing which ecosystem services are provided and who benefits from these services will allow resource managers, scientists, industries, and the public to explore new institutional, market, and policies to encourage protection of and investments in these resources. Objectives of this project are to 1) link the environmental and economic values of the region’s natural assets in a way that establishes a common language for resource managers, scientists, industry, local government and the public to substantively engage in landscape-level conservation planning and 2) to explore different development or management strategies and examine trade-offs to support improved and informed decision-making. A first step in determining...
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Many mountain ecosystems are experiencing coincident increases in temperature, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. All are important controls on rates of plant growth, soil microbial activity, nutrient cycling, and stream N export. It is difficult for experimental studies to explore ecosystem responses to more than one or two treatments at plot, let alone catchment, scale. One might expect, however, ecosystems to respond differently to the combined global change drivers than to climate, CO2, or N alone. We explored this question for nine mountain catchments over the period 1980- 2075 with a simulation model.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The capacity of ecosystems to provide services such as carbon storage, clean water, and forest products is determined not only by variations in ecosystem properties across landscapes, but also by ecosystem dynamics over time. ForWarn is a system developed by the U.S. Forest Service to monitor vegetation change using satellite imagery for the continental United States. It provides near real-time change maps that are updated every eight days, and summaries of these data also provide long-term change maps from 2000 to the present.Based on the detection of change in vegetation productivity, the ForWarn system monitors the effects of disturbances such as wildfires, insects, diseases, drought, and other effects of weather,...
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