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Trout Unlimited

Freshwater fishes are highly vulnerable to human-caused climate change, resulting in rapid changes in status. Because quantitative data on status and trends are unavailable for most fish species, a rapid assessment approach that incorporates expert knowledge is needed to assess current status and future vulnerability. In this study, we present a method that allows systematic evaluation of potential climate change effects on freshwater fishes, using California as an example. The method uses expert knowledge of the authors, supported by literature reviews of status and biology of the fishes, to score ten metrics for both (1) current status of each species (baseline vulnerability to extinction) and (2) likely future...
This online database (https://www.streamcontinuity.org/cdb2/naacc_search_crossing.cfm) serves as a common repository for road-stream crossing assessment data assembled by the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). Both a network of partners and a source of shared resources, the NAACC offers a collaborative framework for taking on the critical task of assessing and upgrading the hundreds of thousands of outdated road-stream crossings across the region that represent barriers to wildlife movement and pose flooding risks to communities. The NAACC offers training in standard protocols for conducting assessments, online tools for prioritizing upgrades based on ecological benefits, and this database...
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Trout Unlimited developed the Conservation Success Index (CSI) in order to become more strategic and effective in our conservation efforts. Using the CSI, we can quantify and map the conservation status of all native coldwater fishes so that comparisons of existing condition, threats, future security, and management opportunities can be made across watersheds, river basins, and entire species. This enables us to deliver conservation in context. The CSI integrates population data from various assessments completed by state and federal agencies with spatial data on habitat and threats gathered by TU scientists to create a common analytical framework applicable to all coldwater fishes. The basic components of...
Understanding factors influencing survival of Pacific salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) is essential to species conservation, because drivers of mortality can vary over multiple spatial and temporal scales. Although recent studies have evaluated the effects of climate, habitat quality, or resource management (e.g., hatchery operations) on salmonid recruitment and survival, a failure to look at multiple factors simultaneously leaves open questions about the relative importance of different factors. We analyzed the relationship between ten factors and survival (1980–2007) of four populations of salmonids with distinct life histories from two adjacent watersheds (Salmon and Scott rivers) in the Klamath River basin, California....
Purpose:The purpose of this Walker Basin Meadows Condition Report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Walker Working Group chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, the working group will use information presented here to plan subsequent restoration efforts once the first group of meadows is restored.Introduction:Meadows of the Walker River basin are an extremely valuable component of the landscape. Meadows provide diverse habitat, including habitat critical to endangered species. They reduce peak flows during storms and soak up spring runoff, recharging groundwater supplies. Meadows filter sediment, provide forage, and are important cultural and recreational...
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