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Tolga Gorum

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Earthquake-induced landslide (EQIL) inventories are essential tools to extend our knowledge of the relationship between earthquakes and the landslides they can trigger. Regrettably, such inventories are difficult to generate and therefore scarce, and the available ones differ in terms of their quality and level of completeness. Moreover, access to existing EQIL inventories is currently difficult because there is no centralized database. To address these issues, we compiled EQIL inventories from around the globe based on an extensive literature study. The database contains information on 363 landslide-triggering earthquakes and includes 66 digital landslide inventories. To make these data openly available, we created...
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This inventory was originally created by Gorum and others (2014) describing the landslides triggered by a sequence of earthquakes, with the largest being the M 6.2 17 km N of Puerto Aisen, Chile earthquake that occurred on 21 April 2007 at 23:45:56 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory includes landslides triggered by a sequence of earthquakes rather than a single mainshock. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory...
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Earthquake-triggered ground failure, such as landsliding and liquefaction, can contribute significantly to losses, but our current ability to accurately include them in earthquake-hazard analyses is limited. The development of robust and widely applicable models requires access to numerous inventories of ground failures triggered by earthquakes that span a broad range of terrains, shaking characteristics, and climates. We present an openly accessible, centralized earthquake-triggered groundfailure inventory repository in the form of a ScienceBase Community to provide open access to these data with the goal of accelerating research progress. The ScienceBase Community hosts digital inventories created by both U.S....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Data Series
Earthquake-triggered ground-failure, such as landsliding and liquefaction, can contribute significantly to losses, but our current ability to accurately include them in earthquake hazard analyses is limited. The development of robust and transportable models requires access to numerous inventories of ground failure triggered by earthquakes that span a broad range of terrains, shaking characteristics, and climates. We present an openly accessible, centralized earthquake-triggered ground-failure inventory repository in the form of a ScienceBase Community to provide open access to these data, and help accelerate progress. The Community hosts digital inventories created by both USGS and non-USGS authors. We present...
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This inventory was originally created by Gorum and others (2011) describing the landslides triggered by the M 7.9 Wenchuan, China earthquake that occurred on 12 May 2008 at 06:28:01 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and associated metadata were not acquired by the U.S. Geological...
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