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Thomas Giambelluca

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The Hawai‘i Drought Knowledge Exchange project has been successfully piloting three sets of formal collaborative knowledge exchanges between researchers and managers to co-produce customized, site specific drought data products to meet the needs of their partners. Through these pilots, knowledge co-production has demonstrated how active collaboration between researchers and managers in the design and production of data products can lead to more useful and accessible applications for drought planning and management. Resource managers have strongly embraced the need for better and more timely information on climate change, variability and drought, as these stressors exert a large and costly impact on resources...
Measurements of fog, wind, fog interception, soil moisture, and fog effects on plant water use and plant survival were collected to test a model to estimate CWI as a function of fog-water movement and vegetation characteristics.
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These files contain two datasets. First are vertical fluxes of energy, water vapor and carbon dioxide calculated by the eddy covariance technique using measurements taken at Olaa tower (Flux Data). Second are results of historical and future runs of the Community Land Model (CLM) for the Thurston and Olaa tower sites (CLM Output Data). Output includes time series of energy, water vapor, and carbon dioxide exchanges at each site. The historical runs are forced by gap-filled measured time series at each site. Future data sets were contructed by shifting values in the historical run by increments selected for possible future scenarios. Increments were based on the results of statistical downscaling of future climate...
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As elevation increases, both temperature and moisture availability decrease. In many parts of the world, this decrease in temperature is a limiting factor for vegetation—at certain elevations, the temperature becomes too cold for plants to survive. However in the tropics, moisture availability may play a more important role than temperature in determining the altitude at which forests can grow. For example on Haleakalā, a volcano on the Hawaiian Island of Mauʻi, the forest line is not found at the same elevation everywhere, as you would expect if it were controlled by temperature. Rather, the forest line is highest in the wetter eastern-most end and lower on the drier, western end of the volcano. Research also...
Measurements of fog, wind, fog interception, soil moisture, and fog effects on plant water use and plant survival were collected along with these vegetation data to test a model to estimate CWI as a function of fog-water movement and these vegetation characteristics.
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