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Tara Williams-Sether

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Annual peak streamflow (peak flow) at a streamgage is defined as the maximum instantaneous flow in a water year. A water year begins on October 1 and continues through September 30 of the following year; for example, water year 2015 extends from October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015. The accuracy, characterization, and completeness of the peak streamflow data are critical in determining flood-frequency estimates that are used daily to design water and transportation infrastructure, delineate flood-plain boundaries, and regulate development and utilization of lands throughout the United States and are essential to understanding the implications of climate and land-use change on flooding and high-flow conditions.As...
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Statistical summaries of streamflow data for 79 historical streamgages in Northern Afghanistan and other selected historical streamgages are presented in this report. The summaries for each streamgage include (1) station description, (2) graph of the annual mean discharge for the period of record, (3) statistics of monthly and annual mean discharges, (4) monthly and annual flow duration, (5) probability of occurrence of annual high discharges, (6) probability of occurrence of annual low discharges, (7) probability of occurrence of seasonal low discharges, (8) annual peak discharges for the period of record, and (9) monthly and annual mean discharges for the period of record.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Data Series
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The Level 1.5 method is a limited-detail method that is used for quick estimates of bridge scour. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana and was used to estimate scour depths at 215 bridge sites located on secondary roads throughout North Dakota. The estimated scour depths are presented in tabular form.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Greater-than-normal precipitation during the summer of 1993 affected the hydrologic response and surface-water quality in the Devils Lake Basin. Large areas in the basin were flooded as a result of the precipitation, and water from these areas drained slowly through the chain of lakes into Devils Lake. This report summarizes the results of surface-water quantity and quality monitoring designed to document the effects of flooding in the Devils Lake Basin. Specific objectives are (1) to document the quantity and quality of streamflow in the Devils Lake Basin immediately before, during, and after the 1993 flood and (2) to document the hydrologic and chemical changes in the upstream chain of lakes and in Devils Lake...
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A Level 2 bridge scour method was used to estimate scour depths at 36 selected bridge sites located on the primary road system throughout North Dakota. Of the 36 bridge sites analyzed, the North Dakota Department of Transportation rated 15 as scour critical. Flood and scour data were collected at 19 of the 36 selected bridge sites during 1990-97. Data collected were sufficient to estimate pier scour but not contraction or abutment scour. Estimated pier scour depths ranged from -10.6 to -1.2 feet, and measured bed-elevation changes at piers ranged from -2.31 to +2.37 feet. Comparisons between the estimated pier scour depths and the measured bed-elevation changes indicate that the pier scour equations overestimate...
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