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Scott Robinson

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) recently completed an unprecedented assessment of almost 14,000 dams in the Northeastern United States. The Northeast Aquatic Connectivity (NAC) project allows fisheries managers and other interested parties to assess dams at multiple scales based on their potential to benefit anadromous and resident fish species if removed or bypassed. This work has continued, with support from NOAA and USFWS, in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, where data refinements and further analysis have produced a web map and tool that allow users to interactively prioritize dams for mitigation at multiple scales and with varying criteria.The Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) has recently completed...
The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers, and estuaries of the SALCC region. It will also identify critical information gaps that must be filled to reduce the uncertainty of streamflow requirements for aquatic ecosystems used by state and federal agencies to protect water resources. Further, the results of this project will include assessments of the likely impacts of climate change to the region’s aquatic resources.
The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers, and estuaries of the SALCC region. It will also identify critical information gaps that must be filled to reduce the uncertainty of streamflow requirements for aquatic ecosystems used by state and federal agencies to protect water resources. Further, the results of this project will include assessments of the likely impacts of climate change to the region’s aquatic resources.
The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers, and estuaries of the SALCC region. It will also identify critical information gaps that must be filled to reduce the uncertainty of streamflow requirements for aquatic ecosystems used by state and federal agencies to protect water resources. Further, the results of this project will include assessments of the likely impacts of climate change to the region’s aquatic resources.
The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers, and estuaries of the SALCC region. It will also identify critical information gaps that must be filled to reduce the uncertainty of streamflow requirements for aquatic ecosystems used by state and federal agencies to protect water resources. Further, the results of this project will include assessments of the likely impacts of climate change to the region’s aquatic resources.
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