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Samantha Chisholm Hatfield

Abstract (from SpringerLink): Western climate science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) represent complementary and overlapping views of the causes and consequences of change. In particular, observations of changes in abundance, distribution, phenology, or behavior of the natural environment (including plants and animals) can have a rich cultural and spiritual interpretation in Indigenous communities that may not be present in western science epistemologies. Using interviews with Indigenous elders and other Traditional Knowledge holders, we demonstrate that assumptions about the nature, perception, and utilization of time and timing can differ across knowledge systems in regard to climate change.Our interviewees’...
FY2014This project will explore tribal cultural relationships and practices connected to resources and other aspects of nature that are potentially affected by climate change. Tribes are disproportionately affected by climate change because their economies, traditions, and even identity are heavily reliant on place-based natural resources, and changes in these resources may result in associated shifts and adaptations in tribal cultural traditions. Dr. Samantha Chisholm Hatfield, an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz and a cultural anthropologist, will interview elders with two tribes in the Great Basin in order to learn how a changing environment has affected aspects of tribal culture. Observations...
On July 21, 2016, Dr. Samantha Chisholm Hatfield of Oregon State University presented findings from her research on Native cultural responses to climate change in the Great Basin.Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) is based on observations of environmental surroundings over long periods of time. It is an integral aspect of Indigenous cultural knowledge, which is holistic in nature. Because climate change affects the presence, abundance and patterns of distribution of animals and plants, it is important to analyze behaviors and hear tribes’ TEK perspectives connected to those resources. In this project, researchers documented the Duckwater Shoshone and the Paiute tribes’ cultural traditions and responses to climate...
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Tribal communities have spiritually rich and complex connections with the natural environment, and their traditions, identities, and economies rely heavily on local natural resources. Because of this intimate connection with nature, tribes are especially vulnerable to climate changes that disrupt their surroundings. Surprisingly, however, few studies have delved deeply into Native thinking around climate change and its cultural impacts. This project sought to understand the ways in which Native American culture and cultural practices in the northwestern U.S. have been affected by climate change. Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with tribal elders and cultural experts belonging to three Northwest tribes...
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