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Robert P. Wintsch

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We present new evidence for the assignment of the Neoproterozoic Massabesic Gneiss Complex of New Hampshire to the Gander terrane rather than the Avalon terrane. The majority of Avalonian (sensu stricto) igneous and meta-igneous rocks as defined in Maritime Canada have positive whole-rock ɛNd compared to more negative values for Gander rocks, although there is a region of overlap in ɛNd between the two terranes. Our samples from areas in Connecticut previously thought to be Avalonian and samples from the Willimantic dome have the same isotopic signatures as Maritime Canada Avalon. In contrast, samples from the Clinton dome of southern Connecticut plots exclusively in the Gander field. The majority of the orthogneiss...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Journal of Science
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New 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende and muscovite from the Orange-Milford belt in southern Connecticut reflect cooling from Acadian amphibolite facies metamorphism between ∼380 to 360 Ma followed by retrograde recrystallization of fabric-forming muscovite and chlorite during lower greenschist facies Alleghanian transpression at ∼280 Ma. Reported field temperature and pressure gradients are improbably high for these rocks and a NW metamorphic field gradient climbing from chlorite-grade to staurolite-grade occurs over less than 5 km. Simple tilting cannot account for this compressed isograd spacing given the geothermal gradient of ∼20 °C/km present at the time of regional metamorphism. However, post-metamorphic transpression...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Journal of Science
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