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Reid, Mary L.

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The Earth's mean surface air temperature has warmed by 1° C over the last 100 years and is projected to increase at a faster rate in the future, accompanied by changes in precipitation patterns and increases in the occurrence of extreme weather events. In western North America, projected increases in mean annual temperatures range from 1 to 3.5° C by the 2050s, and although projected changes in precipitation patterns are more complex to model, more frequent and severe droughts are expected in many areas. For long-lived tree species, because of their relatively slow rates of migration, climate change will likely result in a mismatch between the climate that trees are currently adapted to and the climate that trees...
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Synopsis: This study monitored the response of a species of pine bark beetle, Trypodendron lineatum, to direct and indirect measures of habitat availability in a forest subjected to various levels of harvest intensities. Four stand types (conifer dominated, mixed, deciduous dominated, and deciduous dominated with conifer understory) were treated with four levels of harvest intensity (unharvested, 50%, 80%, and 90% harvested). Prior to harvest, the pine bark beetle was most abundant in stands with many host trees (conifer dominated stands). In the first and second summers after harvest, pine beetle abundance increased exponentially with percent spruce cover and the number of spruce stumps in the stand. Beetles were...
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Synopsis: This study evaluated the effects of landscape management on the spread of mountain pine beetle colonization in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada. Researchers used annual aerial survey data and geo-referenced locations of colonized trees that were cut and removed to assess if the area colonized and the spatial extent of pine beetles differed between monitoring and management zones. Pine beetles were allowed to follow their natural course in the monitoring zone, while an extensive eradication program involving cutting and burning colonized trees was established in the management zone. Management resulted in no detectable effect on the scale of the zone. However, at the sub-zone scale, the area affected...
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