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Ray L. Argyle

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We review the status of the Lake Huron fish community between 1970 and 1999 and explore the effects of key stressors. Offshore waters changed little in terms of nutrient enrichment, while phosphorus levels declined in inner Saginaw Bay. Introduced mussels (Dreissena spp.) proliferated and may have caused a decline in Diporeia spp. This introduction could have caused a decline in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) growth and condition, with serious repercussions for commercial fisheries. Bythotrephes, an exotic predatory cladoceran, and other new exotics may be influencing the fish community. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) remained prevalent, but intensive control efforts on the St. Mary's River may reduce...
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We used a MiniROVER MK II remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to collect ground-truth information on fish and their habitat in the Great Lakes that have traditionally been collected by divers, or with static cameras, or submersibles. The ROV, powered by 4 thrusters and controlled by the pilot at the surface, was portable and efficient to operate throughout the Great Lakes in 1987, and collected a total of 30 h of video data recorded for later analysis. We collected 50% more substrate information per unit of effort with the ROV than with static cameras. Fish behavior ranged from no avoidance reaction in ambient light, to erratic responses in the vehicle lights. The ROV's field of view depended on the time of day, light...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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We present evidence for a hypothesis that the deepwater ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) of the Laurentian Great Lakes were selected for buoyancy-regulation traits that facilitated planktivory on Mysis relict, a crustacean that undertakes extensive diel vertical migration (DVM). We assessed the vertical distribution and behavior of bloaters (C. hoyi) in Lake Michigan with bottom and mid-water trawls in late summer 1987 and with acoustics in August 1995. Biomass of bloaters on the lake bottom was reduced by 84% at night. Mean size of bloaters increased with depth as did the reduction in night biomass. Juvenile bloaters (<160 mm total length) occurred in both warm surface waters and in the hypolimnion where adults were aggregated....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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We found mean target strength to be a reliable in situ predictor of fish weight, which allows direct estimation of the pelagic planktivore fish biomass from target strength measurements. Fish were collected by midwater trawling concurrent with target strength measurements (120-kHz frequency) in Lake Michigan. The mean weight of fish caught ranged from 2 to 71 g and mean target strength ranged from –54.9 to –38.0 decibels. Changes in mean target strength explained 73% of the variability in mean weight for combinations of various planktivore species, principally rainbow smelt Osrnerus mordax, bloaters Coregonus hovi, and alewives Alosa pseudoharengus. Bloaters were found to be less acoustically reflective than the...
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Fingerling channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were given diets containing 0, 0.4, 0.8, or 4.0 I?g dieldrin/g of food (dry weight) for 210 days, followed by a dieldrin-free diet for 56 days. Catfish receiving 4.0 I?g dieldrin/g food gained about 17% less weight than the control fish in 210 days and about 35% less weight during the last 126 days of the 210-day period. No growth differences were attributable to the ingestion of 0.4 or 0.8 I?g dieldrin/g of feed. Mortality during the experiment was random and not appreciable. Dieldrin accumulations were characterized by an immediate rapid rise of residue levels in the tissues, followed by a period during which concentrations were relatively stable. Residues in tissues...
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